Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: NY Jets offensive coordinator Tony Sparano answers critics who think he's the Plodfat

  1. #1
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    16,525
    Post Thanks / Like

    NY Jets offensive coordinator Tony Sparano answers critics who think he's the Plodfat

    It's a good article, despite the fact that Manish has quickly become one of the worst beat writers covering this team, his obsession of Tebow is down right unprofessional and irresponsible, he alone has been trying to stir up controversey since the trade happened.

    I follow him on Twitter, and he's blocked me for asking him why he is obsessed with Tebow in almost every article?

    --
    NY Jets offensive coordinator Tony Sparano answers critics who think he's the Plodfather

    The former Miami Dolphins coach has been criticized for being too conservative, too reckless and too unsure how to use Tim Tebow in his first year with the Jets

    Comments (2) By Manish Mehta / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

    Saturday, October 27, 2012, 1:30 PM




    Robert Sabo/New York Daily News

    NY Jets offensive coordinator Tony Sparano encourages his troops during recent practice.

    Tony Sparano walked out of MetLife Stadium just after midnight three weeks ago, drove his wife home and headed back to the Jets’ practice facility with a sandwich in his hand. The Jets’ offensive coordinator usually arrives at work each day at 4:15 a.m., but his mind was racing after the Jets’ 23-17 Monday night loss to the Texans earlier this month.


    So, Sparano holed up in his office to review the past and plan for the
    future. Sparano stayed in the building until 11 p.m., a dizzying 40-hour stretch without sleep that he hoped would pay off.
    THE PLAYBOOK: DOLPHINS (3-3) AT JETS (3-4)

    Sparano has been criticized for being too conservative, too reckless and too unsure how to use Tim Tebow in his first year with the Jets. The life of an offensive play-caller means being second-guessed every step of the way, but Sparano’s vision for his offense hasn’t changed: He believes better things are on the horizon for a unit that ranks 18th in scoring offense and 29th in total offense.

    “Staying the course and believing in what you believe in is what allows your football team to get better,” Sparano told the Daily News in the run-up to Sunday’s game against the team he used to coach, the Miami Dolphins. “That has helped us to get better right now. Each week, we’re doing something better out there.”



    Tony Sparano - Robert Sabo/New York Daily News

    Sparano has encountered plenty of challenges in his first year as a coordinator since 2006. He has managed the unique quarterback dynamic with Mark Sanchez and Tebow and has adjusted to a rash of injuries to just about every key offensive weapon, including the season-ending one to his most dynamic player, Santonio Holmes.

    Along the way, Sparano, a disciple of Bill Parcells, has fought off the
    perception that he’s too safe with his play calls. The Jets actually have a 52-48 pass-run ratio through the first seven games.'

    “Everybody knows that part of Coach Parcells’ philosophy was to run the ball,” said Sparano, whose first play-calling gig was for Boston University’s run-and-shoot offense in the early ’90s. “You got to run it to win. That’s been ingrained in my head and I do believe that. . . . You got to be able to do it. It’s not something that I’m ashamed of.”

    More than anything, the revolving door around Sanchez has been the biggest hurdle for the coordinator. The Jets have had their top four pass catchers — Dustin Keller, Jeremy Kerley, Stephen Hill and Holmes — on the field together for only 16 plays this season, Sparano said.

    “To not have that group out there, but to have it in my mind on paper that this was the group that we were going to have out there, that hurts you a little bit,” Sparano said. “You spend the whole offseason thinking that I got this tight end that I could mess around with. I got this receiver that I can mess around with. I got this other receiver that we just drafted. . . . That part of it has muddied the water along the way because you don’t know who’s been healthy and who hasn’t been healthy.”


    In practical terms, those injuries have increased Sparano’s workload, which usually results in a bloated call sheet that he develops at the start of the week. He’ll devise many plays with specific personnel packages that may be practiced during the week, but won’t be used on Sundays if one of the players involved in a particular package can’t go on game days.

    “For a play-caller, that sucks,” Sanchez told The News. “It really does. That’s tough. I don’t envy the guy. That’s crazy even thinking about him having to game plan that. He’s done it and he hasn’t said a word about it.”

    Sparano has also added countless hours to his weekly preparation time trying to blend Tebow into the offense even though the versatile backup quarterback has averaged only seven offensive snaps per game through the first seven weeks.

    “I absolutely love having the Tebow element in my offense,” Sparano said. “I’ve been a head coach before — and that’s the thing that I think gets lost in this — (so) I know what people are preparing for. You can see it with the way some people play us. You can see it when (Tebow) enters the game or when there’s a threat of him entering the game.”

    “Plus, it gives me the opportunity to work with a kid who is so eager,” Sparano added. “(He’s) a young player who wants to continue to develop and wants to continue to make his way in this deal here. I enjoy that. I love it. There’s not one bad thing about having a player like Tim Tebow on your team. Not one person could ever say that.”

    This season, the Jets endured a 35-possession stretch during which they scored just 16 points (one TD, 3 FGs). Gang Green averaged 4.7 yards per play and converted only 37.1% of its third downs in the first five games. In the past two weeks, Sparano’s offense has converted 51.9% of its third downs and has averaged 5.3 yards per play. The running game awoke from a month-long slumber in recent weeks.

    “When you really start to understand him, you know that he’s not just a grumpy guy,” Sanchez said. “He wants it right. He expects it right. When you do it right, he’s pretty fun to be around. When you don’t execute as well as you should and you come up short on things you know you can do better in and he knows you can do better in, then he’s not as enjoyable. Because he’s going to let you know.”

    It’s no coincidence that Sanchez’s improved play the past two weeks has been partly due to Sparano’s tough, but fair guidance.

    “We’ve had our share of heated talks,” Sanchez admitted. “There’s a time (when he) pulls me aside and says quietly but firmly, ‘Hey, you know. Pick it up, figure it out, wake up.’ ”

    Ultimately, the Jets’ playoff hopes will ride on how well Sanchez absorbs and executes Sparano’s system.

    “The kid’s handled it with tremendous poise, tremendous focus and tremendous work ethic,” Sparano said. “I’m not just saying that. Are there things that we need to get better at? Sure. . . . but I see this guy getting better and better and better at what we’re doing each week.”


    Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/fo...#ixzz2AYYn9ltJ

  2. #2
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Durham, CA
    Posts
    8,460
    Post Thanks / Like
    You know lil tubsy is just itching for a W tomorrow against his old, once beloved, Dolfags.

    Go Jizznetts!

  3. #3
    Jets Insider VIP
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    18,353
    Post Thanks / Like




    The University of New Haven misses him.

  4. #4
    JetsInsider.com Legend
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    37,725
    Post Thanks / Like
    Plodfat?


  5. #5
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Durham, CA
    Posts
    8,460
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Warfish View Post
    Plodfat?

    Whatever it is, it must be a relative of your blobfish sig.

  6. #6
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    light-years ahead
    Posts
    2,426
    Post Thanks / Like
    Sparano has been criticized for being too conservative, too reckless and too unsure how to use Tim Tebow in his first year with the Jets. The life of an offensive play-caller means being second-guessed every step of the way, but Sparano’s vision for his offense hasn’t changed: He believes better things are on the horizon for a unit that ranks 18th in scoring offense and 29th in total offense.

    So, Sparano holed up in his office to review the past and plan for the
    future. Sparano stayed in the building until 11 p.m., a dizzying 40-hour stretch without sleep that he hoped would pay off.

    Sparano has also added countless hours to his weekly preparation time trying to blend Tebow into the offense even though the versatile backup quarterback has averaged only seven offensive snaps per game through the first seven weeks.

    “I absolutely love having the Tebow element in my offense,” Sparano said. “I’ve been a head coach before — and that’s the thing that I think gets lost in this — (so) I know what people are preparing for. You can see it with the way some people play us. You can see it when (Tebow) enters the game or when there’s a threat of him entering the game.”

    “Plus, it gives me the opportunity to work with a kid who is so eager,” Sparano added. “(He’s) a young player who wants to continue to develop and wants to continue to make his way in this deal here. I enjoy that. I love it. There’s not one bad thing about having a player like Tim Tebow on your team. Not one person could ever say that.”


    This season, the Jets endured a 35-possession stretch during which they scored just 16 points (one TD, 3 FGs).
    It makes perfect sense that Tebow would be voted "most overrated" - which essentially means "biggest disappointment."

    Based on last year's performance, teams expected more from Tebow this year, not less.

    But Sparano has Tebow in handcuffs and ankle chains with a paralyzing playlist that apparently fools nobody but Tony.

    Teams prepare for Tebow - the Tebow that juked entire defenses to death in open field last year - and all they get now are decaf up-the-middle nibblers on the heels of O-linemen week after week.

    The Niners came to town and made it look so routine by sensibly feeding Kaepernick the ball in enough open space to get his wheels burning and do some damage.

    Not Sparanilla. Not with his dumbed-down Prevent Offense.

    He'll call his signature Ricky-Ronnie-Tebow direct-snap up the middle 2-yard dazzler for a crowd numbing three f'kin times per game. Four versus New England.

    Tebow excels in open field. Get him the ball in some usable space. Pitch-outs, roll-outs, screens, dumpoffs, etc. WTF is Sparano waiting for?

    By jamming Tebow at the line we're doing 90% of the defense's work for them. He's already mugged by Sparano's vanilla mozzarella play designs.

    Let the genie out of the friggin' bottle. That's what everyone wants to see.

    That's also the part Tebow fans and Woody don't quite comprehend; that in the unlikely event that Tebow is used as a starter, Sparano will sandbag and suffocate the life out of TT and destroy any skills the kid has.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Follow Us