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Thread: The Novel "Atlas Shrugged" By Ayn Rand/Dystopia And Objectivism

  1. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by SONNY WERBLIN View Post
    LOL!! Brought my kids to see Cats off-broadway (a long time ago). I was not prepared for how truly awesomely bad it was.... Springtime for Hitler would seem to be a more serious attempt at musical theater than Cats. I'm convinced the playwrite was simply re-living an acid trip.
    Great, now I'm sold on wanting to see Cats.

  2. #42

  3. #43
    Bewildered Beast
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    Ah yes the lame tome that those looking to exploit the middle class love. A warning regarding monolithic, party-driven governments without the 3 branches.

    I have a somewhat related question: Are we allowed to vote on how the tax code is structured?

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warfish View Post
    Left wing critics like the Economist. The Wall Street Journal. And Norman Davies.





    Yes, I'm sure you know far more than any Historian.



    Which has what to do with the book? The book is about how Stalin and Hitler both engaged in mass murder.

    As I expected, you've never read a word of it.

    Silly me, consider me duly baited. I should have known better. Won't happen again.




    I read the book, but what you did was worse. "Read it" but didn't understand it.

    Of course I have far more understanding, I have real Polish/Russian bloodlines with real family history.
    What did you do - marry a Pole, eat a plate of golumpkis and pronounce yourself an honorary Pole de gustibus?

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jungle Shift Jet View Post
    I read the book, but what you did was worse. "Read it" but didn't understand it.
    The entire thrust of the book to the point I'm at is that the Russians and Stalin engaged in political mass murder just as the Nazi's did. That Poles, Ukrainians and Belarusians suffered under both Soviet Communist and Nazi Facist genocides during this period.

    To deny this fact is no different that denying the Jewish Holocaust.

    In any event, I'm sure you "having family from Russia" makes you an expert on the era, and your word alone surely holds more sway than hundreds of pages of documented and cited references.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by WestCoastOffensive View Post
    Ah yes the lame tome that those looking to exploit the middle class love. A warning regarding monolithic, party-driven governments without the 3 branches.

    I have a somewhat related question: Are we allowed to vote on how the tax code is structured?
    answer: kinda. You have the ability to comply or not comply.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by freestater View Post
    answer: kinda. You have the ability to comply or not comply.
    Just ask Wesley Snipes.

  8. #48
    Atlas Shrugged FAQ Site:

    This FAQ addresses questions about Ayn Rand's novel Atlas Shrugged. These include questions about the book (availability, history, etc.), and its story. This FAQ was last updated on March 19, 2011.

    http://www.noblesoul.com/orc/books/rand/atlas/faq.html


  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by freestater View Post
    answer: kinda. You have the ability to comply or not comply.
    Right we have to get reps in there to fight for it.

  10. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by WestCoastOffensive View Post
    Right we have to get reps in there to fight for it.
    We're all just practice squad players really.

  11. #51
    The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_For...eat_Depression

    The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression is a (2007) book by Amity Shlaes and published by HarperCollins. The book is a re-analysis of the events of the Great Depression, generally from a free-market perspective. The book criticizes Herbert Hoover and the Smoot-Hawley Tariff for their role in exacerbating the Depression through government intervention. It criticizes Franklin D. Roosevelt for erratic policies that froze investment and for the steps needed to stop the Depression. Shlaes criticizes the New Deal for extending the length of the Depression and for its effects on individuals.

    Shlaes praises the model offered by Wendell Willkie before the 1940 presidential election, where the New Deal would have been scaled back and business would have stepped in.

    The book begins with an anecdote of the 1937 recession, eight years after the Depression began, when Roosevelt adopted budget-balancing policies indistinguishable from the stereotype of what Hoover supposedly did. Shlaes presents her arguments in part by telling stories of self-starters who showed what the free market could have accomplished without the New Deal.

    The book argues that members of FDR's "Brain Trust", including Rexford Tugwell of Columbia University, had connections to the Soviets and their interest in central planning.

    The Forgotten Man has been praised by Republican politicians such as Newt Gingrich, Rudolph Giuliani, Mark Sanford, Jon Kyl, and Mike Pence. Fred Barnes of the conservative Weekly Standard has called Shlaes one of the Republican party's major assets. "Amity Shlaes's book on the failure of the New Deal to revive the economy, The Forgotten Man, was widely read by Republicans in Washington." In February 2009 during the Senate confirmation hearing for Energy Secretary Steven Chu, Republican Senator John Barrasso waved a copy of the book and announced, "In these economic times, a number of members of the Senate are reading a book called The Forgotten Man, about the history of the Great Depression, as we compare and look for solutions, as we look at a stimulus package."

    On the other hand, The Forgotten Man and its key arguments have been criticized by liberal Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman, among others. Krugman wrote of "a whole intellectual industry, mainly operating out of right-wing think tanks, devoted to propagating the idea that FDR actually made the Depression worse.... But the definitive study of fiscal policy in the 1930s, by the MIT economist E. Cary Brown, reached a very different conclusion: Fiscal stimulus was unsuccessful 'not because it does not work, but because it was not tried'." Krugman is among a number of reviewers who criticized Shlaes for "misleading statistics"—specifically the use of a series for employment during the 1930s that omitted those working in public works programs. Shlaes responded to Krugman in the Wall Street Journal that the Bureau of Labor Statistics series she had used "intentionally did not include temporary jobs in emergency programs—because to count a short-term, make-work project as a real job was to mask the anxiety of one who really didn't have regular work with long-term prospects". Shlaes said that if the Obama administration "proposes F.D.R.-style recovery programs, then it is useful to establish whether those original programs actually brought recovery. The answer is, they didn’t." Writing in Forbes, former United States Department of Labor chief economist and Hudson Institute fellow Diana Furchtgott-Roth called it the "economic fight of the year."


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