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Thread: ELECTRIC GUITAR HELP!

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Borgoguy View Post
    Two P-90s in that thing, WCO. For $89!? On principle, I might need to buy one, too.
    Yes, principle.

    Quote Originally Posted by Timmy® View Post
    I'm seeing basic humbuckers, p-90's, and strat single coils. We need to know what kind of music the kid likes to play. Whenever I see a young kid
    blasting away at guitar center, it's usually on humbuckers.

    Oddly, I've never known a young kid to like P-90s. I like them now, their grungy fuzziness scratches new lines in my brain.
    P-90 is the name of the actual Chinese Re-Education center where those eponymous pickups a were once made. The vintage value is said to reflect the amount of blood spilled to make those tolerances.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timmy® View Post
    were (are) you the guy here that worked for Gibson?
    Nope. Just a guy who's played for a while. I gig on the weekends and Wednesday nights at a wine bar in Arizona. Purely hobby. And I have never owned a Gibson guitar. Just never found one I really liked. Personal preference I guess.

  3. #63
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    When I was giving lessons, I found that kids who owned an electric guitar, without knowing how to play it, got more frustrated because they couldn't get it to make the cool sounds they thought they could. They also get distracted by whammy bars, switches, knobs and amps. Acoustics, though entirely less cool, seem to streamline the learning process.

    And don't buy used (especially electric). Kids **** guitars up all the time, and you'll want a warranty when the tuning key just happens to fall off or the output jack magically becomes intermittent. I worked for Fender in the tech dept, and we always helped kids out even if the problem was obviously a non warranty issue.

    The suggestions on here for PRS's are a bit pricey for a first guitar IMO. 200-300$ and you will have a decent guitar that won't fold in on itself in a year yet cheap enough to gamble that he'll stick with it. And again, have it set up professionally. Pay 100 or whatever to get it setup by the best tech in town. Make sure the nut slots are filed correctly and to the right height. This is probably the most important thing for a first time player. They live in the first position and if the nut slots are too high, it will be really hard to play. I would also recommend (if you decide to go acoustic) try to get one that doesn't have a solid wood top. They sound better, but are prone to drying out and cracking if not properly humidified. Especially this time of year. I have 6 or 7 guitars in my shop right now that are in for cracked tops because the guitar dried out. Some with multiple cracks at 70-140$ a crack to repair depending on whether or not I have to spline them. That's without finish touch up. Three of those guitars are Martins. $$$.

    And there's nothing wrong with buying online this time. He probably doesn't have the ear yet to know what sounds "good" and what doesn't. Once he's established the ability to play, as well as a more sensitive palette, take him to a local guitar shop to try them out. See which one likes him best.

    Companies to Avoid: Dean, Washburn, Oscar Schmidt, Jasmine, Samick. That's not to say that occasionally they put out a decent guitar, but more often than not, if one of these crosses my bench, it's a POS.

    Companies to explore: Yamaha, Fender, Seagull, Epiphone, BlueRidge, Art & Lutherie, Ibanez. These, in general, have better build quality, setup nicer, and more frequently sound better.

  4. #64
    I've been playing guitar (and several other instruments) for many years. I would say it would be easier for your child to start with an electric guitar because the strings are easier to depress and let's face it they're going to eventually wind up with an electric guitar anyway so why not start with one?

    A nice entry level Fender Stratocaster or Telecaster would be good. Then pick up a good multieffects processor (Boss makes a couple of nice ones) and maybe a small Fender practice amp to go along with it. That should last your child quite a while without growing out of it.

  5. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by ubrnostrum View Post
    When I was giving lessons, I found that kids who owned an electric guitar, without knowing how to play it, got more frustrated because they couldn't get it to make the cool sounds they thought they could. They also get distracted by whammy bars, switches, knobs and amps. Acoustics, though entirely less cool, seem to streamline the learning process.

    And don't buy used (especially electric). Kids **** guitars up all the time, and you'll want a warranty when the tuning key just happens to fall off or the output jack magically becomes intermittent. I worked for Fender in the tech dept, and we always helped kids out even if the problem was obviously a non warranty issue.

    The suggestions on here for PRS's are a bit pricey for a first guitar IMO. 200-300$ and you will have a decent guitar that won't fold in on itself in a year yet cheap enough to gamble that he'll stick with it. And again, have it set up professionally. Pay 100 or whatever to get it setup by the best tech in town. Make sure the nut slots are filed correctly and to the right height. This is probably the most important thing for a first time player. They live in the first position and if the nut slots are too high, it will be really hard to play. I would also recommend (if you decide to go acoustic) try to get one that doesn't have a solid wood top. They sound better, but are prone to drying out and cracking if not properly humidified. Especially this time of year. I have 6 or 7 guitars in my shop right now that are in for cracked tops because the guitar dried out. Some with multiple cracks at 70-140$ a crack to repair depending on whether or not I have to spline them. That's without finish touch up. Three of those guitars are Martins. $$$.

    And there's nothing wrong with buying online this time. He probably doesn't have the ear yet to know what sounds "good" and what doesn't. Once he's established the ability to play, as well as a more sensitive palette, take him to a local guitar shop to try them out. See which one likes him best.

    Companies to Avoid: Dean, Washburn, Oscar Schmidt, Jasmine, Samick. That's not to say that occasionally they put out a decent guitar, but more often than not, if one of these crosses my bench, it's a POS.

    Companies to explore: Yamaha, Fender, Seagull, Epiphone, BlueRidge, Art & Lutherie, Ibanez. These, in general, have better build quality, setup nicer, and more frequently sound better.
    There's only one problem with acoustic guitars (I own a few), they're boring to an entry level musician... You're right the kids want to make the sounds they like, but so does every other experienced musician in the world. 90 percent of all musicians out there are "gear heads", they can never get enough gear. Having the ability to make new and unique sounds keeps the learner interested. I can't tell you how many people I've known who picked up an acoustic guitar, took some lessons, got totally bored with the process, and just quit. Having the ability to "play" with your guitar while you're learning to "play it" is a good way to stay interested long enough to get good at it, and once you're good at it you will then be able to pick up an acoustic and make it do what you want it to do.

    It is my opinion that you EVOLVE to an acoustic guitar... When you become really good, that's when you pick it up.
    Last edited by billygreen; 12-15-2012 at 07:35 AM.

  6. #66
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    IamaImbecile.
    Last edited by 32green; 12-15-2012 at 10:33 AM. Reason: Dude.

  7. #67
    Quote Originally Posted by PlumberKhan View Post
    Acoustic guitars are gay.

    Just like the homos that play them.
    Says the drummer with the tin ear.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by southside View Post
    Says the drummer with the tin ear.
    So deep. You can play Wonderwall on an acoustic.


    Hey! Horseys and buggies are cool. F*ck "motorized" cars.

  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by PlumberKhan View Post
    Acoustic guitars are gay.

    Just like the homos that play them.
    Quote Originally Posted by southside View Post
    Says the drummer with the tin ear.
    Guess these guys were quiffs.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t9LPoU8j7hI

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJg-ZmHV4E0

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQKQ3-bzXV8

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Borgoguy View Post
    Guess these guys were quiffs.
    +1

    Beginners.

    That join the legions of. I dunno. 600 bazillion "guitarists".

    Scan back to page 2 and 3 of this thread

  11. #71
    Quote Originally Posted by PlumberKhan View Post
    +1

    Beginners.

    That join the legions of. I dunno. 600 bazillion "guitarists".

    Scan back to page 2 and 3 of this thread
    LOL. This guy's light in the loafers, too.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZvjsUQQW0E

  12. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by LockeJET View Post
    Thanks for the help everyone! And yes he will be taking lessons.
    Don’t listen to anyone who’s telling to get your 10yr old son stacks of amps, pedals, electric guitars, etc.

    Start with the basics like a decent-classical guitar because it comes with nylon strings.

    Your son is only 10, any speaking from experience ( i’m sure many here will agree) that playing steel strung guitars as a child not only hurt like crap, but actually made me play less often times.

  13. #73
    Bought one of those Epiphone Les Paul Specials last night, in distressed black. With an extra discount and tax, cost me $85 with no shipping. LMFAO.

    I can't wait to get that thing. I'll swap out the strings and decide if the action needs tweaking (most likely). But even with that,
    how the f**k can you go wrong? Worse comes to worse, I sell the P-90s.

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Borgoguy View Post
    Bought one of those Epiphone Les Paul Specials last night, in distressed black. With an extra discount and tax, cost me $85 with no shipping. LMFAO.

    I can't wait to get that thing. I'll swap out the strings and decide if the action needs tweaking (most likely). But even with that,
    how the f**k can you go wrong? Worse comes to worse, I sell the P-90s.
    I can see it now, Hampur reunion, closing song, five Hampurites with disposable Epiphones, WOnt get fooled again....same as the old boss....

    duh duh duh duh duhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh simultaneous overhead guitar slams into the brickwork around baby schween pool.


    Hilarity ensues, camera flashes, high fives and then oxygen masks and blood pressure machines are produced by a previously hidden private nurse hired "just in case" by the fun loving but highly litigious Stokes.


    -


    -

  15. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by 32green View Post
    I can see it now, Hampur reunion, closing song, five Hampurites with disposable Epiphones, WOnt get fooled again....same as the old boss....

    duh duh duh duh duhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh simultaneous overhead guitar slams into the brickwork around baby schween pool.


    Hilarity ensues, camera flashes, high fives and then oxygen masks and blood pressure machines are produced by a previously hidden private nurse hired "just in case" by the fun loving but highly litigious Stokes.


    -


    -
    LOL!!

  16. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by 32green View Post
    I can see it now, Hampur reunion, closing song, five Hampurites with disposable Epiphones, WOnt get fooled again....same as the old boss....

    duh duh duh duh duhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh simultaneous overhead guitar slams into the brickwork around baby schween pool.


    Hilarity ensues, camera flashes, high fives and then oxygen masks and blood pressure machines are produced by a previously hidden private nurse hired "just in case" by the fun loving but highly litigious Stokes.


    -


    -
    Lolzzz. If only we can get so lucky.

  17. #77
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    Just pushed the button on the Epi. Couldn't resist the peer pressure😜looking forward to Hampurpalooza and the amazing guitar quintet.

  18. #78
    Quote Originally Posted by Guitarjet View Post
    Just pushed the button on the Epi. Couldn't resist the peer pressure��looking forward to Hampurpalooza and the amazing guitar quintet.
    Felt great, right, GJ? I've been walking around all morning just laughing to myself about the deal. Even the phone sales guy at
    Guitar Center didn't believe these Les Pauls were new.

  19. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by billygreen View Post
    There's only one problem with acoustic guitars (I own a few), they're boring to an entry level musician... You're right the kids want to make the sounds they like, but so does every other experienced musician in the world. 90 percent of all musicians out there are "gear heads", they can never get enough gear. Having the ability to make new and unique sounds keeps the learner interested. I can't tell you how many people I've known who picked up an acoustic guitar, took some lessons, got totally bored with the process, and just quit. Having the ability to "play" with your guitar while you're learning to "play it" is a good way to stay interested long enough to get good at it, and once you're good at it you will then be able to pick up an acoustic and make it do what you want it to do.

    It is my opinion that you EVOLVE to an acoustic guitar... When you become really good, that's when you pick it up.
    Agree to disagree. In my experience as a teacher, kids generally evolve more effectively to an electric than the opposite.

  20. #80
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    Even if it comes in with crappy strings and high action that's easily fixed. A set of Diadario 09's and a set up will take care of that. $10 if I DIY.

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