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Thread: Sanchez: Where It All Went Wrong

  1. #1

    Sanchez: Where It All Went Wrong

    Sanchez: Where It All Went Wrong

    By MIKE SIELSKI
    From today's WSJ..

    Less than an hour after the Jets routed the Indianapolis Colts on Oct. 14, Mark Sanchez sat on a stool in front of his locker at MetLife MET +6.71% Stadium, tying his shoes, the only player left in the room.

    He had thrown two short touchdowns in the game, but he had attempted just 18 passes and accumulated 82 passing yards. Running back Shonn Greene had rushed for 161 yards and three touchdowns. The Jets' defense had forced four turnovers. Sanchez's greatest contribution to the 35-9 victory was that he hadn't interfered with it.

    As he dressed, Sanchez invited his father, Nick, into the room to sit with him and talk. Nick Sanchez is a fixture at his son's games and has been since Mark was in grade school. Through his four years with the Jets, Mark Sanchez estimated, his father has attended every game save three, and it is a comfort to him to have Nick and the rest of his family there.

    "We're just a tightknit group," said Mark, whose agent is his older brother Nick Jr. "They know the kind of pressure and scrutiny I'm under at all times, and they just want to be there to love me, no matter what."

    The Jets' win over Indianapolis was the most impressive of their otherwise-unimpressive season—a 26-point rout of a playoff team. But the details of that game and the locker-room scene in its aftermath serve as an appropriate symbol of the franchise's recent failure to construct a championship-level team around Sanchez.


    He is a quarterback who is accustomed to and who requires a strong support system, on the field and off. And in allowing that structure to break down—in believing that Sanchez could thrive without it—the Jets made an error so grave that it will likely force them to find another starting quarterback as part of a lengthy rebuilding process.

    Any evaluation of Sanchez's Jets career basically boils down to one of two assertions: Either he hasn't been and won't be an elite quarterback, or he could be if the Jets provided him with better offensive teammates. Neither theory, though, explains fully how the Jets have mishandled Sanchez since they traded up to select him with the fifth overall pick in the 2009 draft. Their mistakes even predate the draft. (The Jets didn't respond to a request for comment.)

    In his autobiography, "Play Like You Mean It," Jets coach Rex Ryan described his awe at seeing 24 receivers volunteer to catch passes during Sanchez's pre-draft workout for the team—as if the more friends Sanchez had, the better quarterback he must be. "I can't think of anybody who doesn't like Mark Sanchez," Ryan wrote, and that sentiment holds true today.

    Sanchez is well regarded among his teammates. They chuckle when, having just finished a weight-room workout, he bounds through the locker room wearing a John McEnroe-style headband. They admire how he handled the media crush that accompanied Tim Tebow's arrival. They like him, and that might be the problem. The Jets mistook likability for leadership.

    "The guy in the locker room who's supposed to be…the biggest pain in the butt is the quarterback," said SNY football analyst and former defensive lineman Kris Jenkins, who was Sanchez's teammate for two years with the Jets. "He's supposed to be that guy—your Peyton Manning type, your Tom Brady type. He's out there to win. It's going to get done because he's so driven to do that."

    Over his first two seasons with the Jets, when the team reached the 2009 and 2010 AFC title games, Sanchez could afford to mature, to fit in as time passed. The Jets had wisely surrounded him with smart, respected, veteran teammates: Alan Faneca, Damien Woody, Tony Richardson, Mark Brunell.

    Gradually, though, the team's front office shaved those players and others like them from the roster, lifting Sanchez to a place of higher prominence within the locker room. Yet he hasn't shown he can bear the burden.

    After the Jets' 2011 season dissolved amid a December collapse and backbiting among teammates, Sanchez said he learned not to "be afraid of that fear of conflict with other people." But this season, there were few outward indications, if any, that Sanchez had made the team his. The visual signals he often sends when something goes wrong—head low, shoulders slumped, his dad there to reassure him at the end of every bad day—don't leave the impression of a quarterback who commands respect.

    Of course, Sanchez's demeanor would be irrelevant if he performed at the same level as Manning or Brady, and it is here where the Jets have let him down to a degree.

    Long ago, the team's player-personnel people should have recognized that Sanchez needed a specific set of conditions around him to succeed: a top-notch rushing attack, experienced receivers and play-calling that minimized the potential mistakes he might make. (Like the 49ers had done with Alex Smith.) The Jets established those conditions in Sanchez's first two seasons, but his accuracy as a passer and his ability to decode an opposing defense's strategy have improved little since his rookie year.

    Ultimately, the Jets were too optimistic about how he would develop. In their best-case scenario, they would make him the heart of the offense in a way he hadn't been. They would give him a contract extension, guaranteeing him $8.25 million next season, and it wouldn't matter if Tim Tebow were around. Sanchez would rise to the challenge.

    Instead, here they are. The Jets are sifting through the rubble of a 6-10 season, looking for a new general manager and a new direction. Two years removed from standing on the brink of the Super Bowl, Mark Sanchez leaves that lonely image from 2012: a quarterback, waiting for someone else's support, sitting all alone.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by rmeyer52 View Post

    "The guy in the locker room who's supposed to be…the biggest pain in the butt is the quarterback," said SNY football analyst and former defensive lineman Kris Jenkins, who was Sanchez's teammate for two years with the Jets. "He's supposed to be that guy—your Peyton Manning type, your Tom Brady type. He's out there to win. It's going to get done because he's so driven to do that."
    I believe the great QBs need to have that dominant, even stubborn personality. Yes, these QBs are usually liked by teammates, fans, etc., but they also have that "joking is done, time to get serious and down to business" trait that commands the respect of his teammates.

    Peyton Manning and Brady definitely have it. You can see Brees as the take charge leader of the Saints. Rivers, before falling off the cliff, was a fiery guy who always had the team playing well (until the playoffs). Despite his past off field distractions, Big Ben is a gamer on the field. Even the new guys -- Wilson, RG3 and Luck. Just listening to them talk and you get a feel that they are relentless workers who can lift other players.

    Sanchez just doesn't seem to have those qualities. Maybe he does, but we haven't seem them. The guy obviously works his ass off to be in top physical shape, but those other things like getting upset too easily or poor body language or not being a get-in-your-face guy -- just doesn't seem like a dominant personality. Most of the stuff we hear about Sanchez is how he's a nice dude and gets a lot of girls off the field.

    The jets need to find, obviously a guy who can play, but someone with thick skin and a I'm-going-to-carry-this-team attitude. So needed for a QB, especially in NY

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by rmeyer52 View Post
    Sanchez: Where It All Went Wrong

    By MIKE SIELSKI
    From today's WSJ..

    Less than an hour after the Jets routed the Indianapolis Colts on Oct. 14, Mark Sanchez sat on a stool in front of his locker at MetLife MET +6.71% Stadium, tying his shoes, the only player left in the room.

    He had thrown two short touchdowns in the game, but he had attempted just 18 passes and accumulated 82 passing yards. Running back Shonn Greene had rushed for 161 yards and three touchdowns. The Jets' defense had forced four turnovers. Sanchez's greatest contribution to the 35-9 victory was that he hadn't interfered with it.

    As he dressed, Sanchez invited his father, Nick, into the room to sit with him and talk. Nick Sanchez is a fixture at his son's games and has been since Mark was in grade school. Through his four years with the Jets, Mark Sanchez estimated, his father has attended every game save three, and it is a comfort to him to have Nick and the rest of his family there.

    "We're just a tightknit group," said Mark, whose agent is his older brother Nick Jr. "They know the kind of pressure and scrutiny I'm under at all times, and they just want to be there to love me, no matter what."

    The Jets' win over Indianapolis was the most impressive of their otherwise-unimpressive season—a 26-point rout of a playoff team. But the details of that game and the locker-room scene in its aftermath serve as an appropriate symbol of the franchise's recent failure to construct a championship-level team around Sanchez.


    He is a quarterback who is accustomed to and who requires a strong support system, on the field and off. And in allowing that structure to break down—in believing that Sanchez could thrive without it—the Jets made an error so grave that it will likely force them to find another starting quarterback as part of a lengthy rebuilding process.

    Any evaluation of Sanchez's Jets career basically boils down to one of two assertions: Either he hasn't been and won't be an elite quarterback, or he could be if the Jets provided him with better offensive teammates. Neither theory, though, explains fully how the Jets have mishandled Sanchez since they traded up to select him with the fifth overall pick in the 2009 draft. Their mistakes even predate the draft. (The Jets didn't respond to a request for comment.)

    In his autobiography, "Play Like You Mean It," Jets coach Rex Ryan described his awe at seeing 24 receivers volunteer to catch passes during Sanchez's pre-draft workout for the team—as if the more friends Sanchez had, the better quarterback he must be. "I can't think of anybody who doesn't like Mark Sanchez," Ryan wrote, and that sentiment holds true today.

    Sanchez is well regarded among his teammates. They chuckle when, having just finished a weight-room workout, he bounds through the locker room wearing a John McEnroe-style headband. They admire how he handled the media crush that accompanied Tim Tebow's arrival. They like him, and that might be the problem. The Jets mistook likability for leadership.

    "The guy in the locker room who's supposed to be…the biggest pain in the butt is the quarterback," said SNY football analyst and former defensive lineman Kris Jenkins, who was Sanchez's teammate for two years with the Jets. "He's supposed to be that guy—your Peyton Manning type, your Tom Brady type. He's out there to win. It's going to get done because he's so driven to do that."

    Over his first two seasons with the Jets, when the team reached the 2009 and 2010 AFC title games, Sanchez could afford to mature, to fit in as time passed. The Jets had wisely surrounded him with smart, respected, veteran teammates: Alan Faneca, Damien Woody, Tony Richardson, Mark Brunell.

    Gradually, though, the team's front office shaved those players and others like them from the roster, lifting Sanchez to a place of higher prominence within the locker room. Yet he hasn't shown he can bear the burden.

    After the Jets' 2011 season dissolved amid a December collapse and backbiting among teammates, Sanchez said he learned not to "be afraid of that fear of conflict with other people." But this season, there were few outward indications, if any, that Sanchez had made the team his. The visual signals he often sends when something goes wrong—head low, shoulders slumped, his dad there to reassure him at the end of every bad day—don't leave the impression of a quarterback who commands respect.

    Of course, Sanchez's demeanor would be irrelevant if he performed at the same level as Manning or Brady, and it is here where the Jets have let him down to a degree.

    Long ago, the team's player-personnel people should have recognized that Sanchez needed a specific set of conditions around him to succeed: a top-notch rushing attack, experienced receivers and play-calling that minimized the potential mistakes he might make. (Like the 49ers had done with Alex Smith.) The Jets established those conditions in Sanchez's first two seasons, but his accuracy as a passer and his ability to decode an opposing defense's strategy have improved little since his rookie year.

    Ultimately, the Jets were too optimistic about how he would develop. In their best-case scenario, they would make him the heart of the offense in a way he hadn't been. They would give him a contract extension, guaranteeing him $8.25 million next season, and it wouldn't matter if Tim Tebow were around. Sanchez would rise to the challenge.

    Instead, here they are. The Jets are sifting through the rubble of a 6-10 season, looking for a new general manager and a new direction. Two years removed from standing on the brink of the Super Bowl, Mark Sanchez leaves that lonely image from 2012: a quarterback, waiting for someone else's support, sitting all alone.

    Either all that or he just stinks! Sanchez is innaccurate and his timing is bad.
    He cant read defenses and he stares his receivers down. Sparano's system did hurt Sanchez. I think Sanchez is much better throwing to a spot than in Sparanos system which was a disaster but he still isnt very good!

  4. #4
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    sanchez sucks. Who cares why. Move on.

  5. #5
    He sucks he really does. But he also is a kid at a man's position. He acted like a child, you saw it on HBO, he was joking around way to much and didn't take his job serious. He thought he was safe after two miracle seasons. When it came crashing down on him it was hard for him to rebound.

  6. #6
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    He left college in junior year and received a ton of money. In retrospect, he should have sat a year. He shouldn't have been paid like an elite QB until he proved he was an elite QB. Tannenbaum/Rex 3 year extention of Sanchez was the wrong direction.

  7. #7
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    He sucks he really does. But he also is a kid at a man's position. He acted like a child, you saw it on HBO, he was joking around way to much and didn't take his job serious. He thought he was safe after two miracle seasons. When it came crashing down on him it was hard for him to rebound.
    Brett Favre was the same way and it didnt effect him.

    Lets stop looking for why this guy stinks. He just stinks. Its not his teammates, its not his personality, its not the coaches etc. its him. Accept it and move on.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe W. Namath View Post
    Brett Favre was the same way and it didnt effect him.

    Lets stop looking for why this guy stinks. He just stinks. Its not his teammates, its not his personality, its not the coaches etc. its him. Accept it and move on.
    Indeed. I don't question why my **** stinks, I just know it does.

  9. #9
    It's not Tebow's fault
    It's not the talents fault
    It's not the OC's fault
    It's not the GM's fault

    I'm not sure of the point of this article, but it does mention Sanchez won early because he wasn't asked to do much. That is why they won early, he wasn't asked to do much and the team won despite him being a bottom 5 QB in the league. Once asked to do more he couldn't.

    End of discussion - Time to move on.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe W. Namath View Post
    Brett Favre was the same way and it didnt effect him.

    Lets stop looking for why this guy stinks. He just stinks. Its not his teammates, its not his personality, its not the coaches etc. its him. Accept it and move on.
    No doubt, but when you don't have the talent of Brett Favre you have to be serious on and off the field. You can't joke around and play ****ty.

  11. #11
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    He has sh*t for brains. Plain and simple. I'm done trying to figure out where it went wrong. It may have been wrong from the start and just masked by a rock-solid roster with loads of veteran leadership.

    In hindsight it was an awful pick. We needed a QB and took a shot. Thats life. But what was worse than the initial pick was the extension and that is where people need to be held accountable

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by DDNYjets View Post
    He has sh*t for brains. Plain and simple. I'm done trying to figure out where it went wrong. It may have been wrong from the start and just masked by a rock-solid roster with loads of veteran leadership.

    In hindsight it was an awful pick. We needed a QB and took a shot. Thats life. But what was worse than the initial pick was the extension and that is where people need to be held accountable
    Exactly. All the media now seems to be defending Tanny...that extension on its own is a fireable offense.

  13. #13
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    Early in his first NFL year, Mark Sanchez tweeted asking fans if he should go see the "Lion King" on his day off.

    I had a sinking feeling once I learned that the new quarterback of the New York Jets liked show tunes ...

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe W. Namath View Post
    Brett Favre was the same way and it didnt effect him.

    Lets stop looking for why this guy stinks. He just stinks. Its not his teammates, its not his personality, its not the coaches etc. its him. Accept it and move on.
    That's not true. Favre was drafted by Atlanta and partied his way out in 1 year. There were many people that thought he didn't have the mentality for the game. When he got traded to GB that was his wakeup call.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by rmeyer52 View Post
    Sanchez: Where It All Went Wrong

    Gradually, though, the team's front office shaved those players and others like them from the roster, lifting Sanchez to a place of higher prominence within the locker room. Yet he hasn't shown he can bear the burden.
    This.

    Beyond all his failings on a pure football-field level, the inaccuracy, lack of vision, lack of pocket precence, bad decision making and his penchant for turnovers, especially in the red zone....beyond all that, this.

    By Year #4, your 1st Round Draft Pick QB should BE the Teams Leader. He should not have to have a Veteran, long-past-his-prime-fullback leading the team for him and holding his hand.

    By Year #4, he shouldn't be the "funny kid wearing a headband" desperate to be liked, he should be the uncontested leader fo men on the team, the ultimate part players mucy be accountable to below the Head Coach.

    This is one aspect of the failure of Mark Sanchez that gets lost under all his obvious on-field failings. He's Jeff George. He's simply not a leader of men, he does not inspire his teammates, he does not make his teammates better, or demand better. He's a little kid who just wants to be liked and have a good fun time. And when he doesn't play well, he mopes, like a kid who got told "no" when he asked the head cheerleader to prom.

    Sanchez is the total package of a bust first round QB. Drafted based on his potential, not his production, he has failed completely to develop that potential.

    He has not improved his accuracy (barely 50%, far below leage average), his pocket presence or pressure feel, his turnovers (worst QB in he NFL over 4 years, worst in 2012), his bad decision making and on and on.

    But more, he has not developed himself into a leader, on the field or off. He's still just a little kid who needs his hand held in order to have any chance of success.

    Sorry, but by your fourth year in the NFL, it supposed to be you leading and holding the hands of your players, pulling them to success behidn you.

    Mark Sanhcez is still just a follower. He's no leader.

  16. #16
    I think it all began to go south for Sanchez when the JETS told him to slide rather than go for the extra yards. It sent a clear message that the defense will win the games and to be afraid of making a big play and getting hurt.

    I think it really took a lot of his MOJO away

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by copernicus View Post
    I think it all began to go south for Sanchez when the JETS told him to slide rather than go for the extra yards. It sent a clear message that the defense will win the games and to be afraid of making a big play and getting hurt.

    I think it really took a lot of his MOJO away
    I'm not sure about the sliding but Sanchez was different than his first two seasons. He had no MOJO and looked robotic. I supported him this season but he continued to regress where I can't support him anymore.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by JETFAN1 View Post
    I'm not sure about the sliding but Sanchez was different than his first two seasons. He had no MOJO and looked robotic. I supported him this season but he continued to regress where I can't support him anymore.
    He was never good. I just can't recall a time when Sanchez was consistent quality NFL QB.

    He's never completed over 60%, he's led the league in INT's over his four years.

    I'm not sure he regressed as much as he's just terrible.

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    Sancho cheated on the Wonderlic

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe W. Namath View Post
    sanchez sucks. Who cares why. Move on.
    This

    We can debate as to why Sanchez sucks until the cows come home.

    But does it really matter?

    Kick his ass out the door and turn the page already.

    Nice guy, terrible QB.

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