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Thread: Shefter just reports Jerry Angelo high on the Jets list (merged)

  1. #1

    Shefter just reports Jerry Angelo high on the Jets list (merged)

    wouldnt be upset with this move at all..experienced ..built past champion..i think this would be a solid move for jets...thoughts?

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    Chris Gross
    ‏@CGROSS97
    Schefter just said the name to keep an eye on for #Jets GM is Jerry Angelo, & that Cohen is a strong candidate. *Throws self off building.*

  2. #2
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    Schefter just reports Jerry Angelo high on the Jets list....

    Adam Schefter just reported that Jets are doing 2nd interviews this week with 2 candidates (names of the candidates were not specifically mentioned) and said Jerry Angelo interviewed extremely well and is high on the Jets list. Scott Cohen's name was also mentioned again.

    Schefty said a decision should be finalized sometime this week.

    No link sorry....just reported on ESPN.
    Last edited by ARodFLKeysJetsFan; 01-13-2013 at 11:48 AM.

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    It concerns me that he failed time and time again to get a franchise QB for the Bears (and no, I don't consider Jay Cutler a franchise QB) but we could certainly do worse -- he has experience and a proven track record.

    There would be a fan revolt if they promoted Cohen.

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    Just threw up in my mouth

  5. #5
    Just threw up in my mouth again. Worst two names that could have popped up.

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    I was hoping Jim Popp would get interviewed again but his name was not specifically mentioned.
    Last edited by ARodFLKeysJetsFan; 01-13-2013 at 11:47 AM.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by shuler82 View Post
    Just threw up in my mouth
    why down on angelo?? has a proven superbowl track record no??

  8. #8
    Durkin: Jerry Angelo And The Anatomy Of A Failure

    September 28, 2011

    By Dan Durkin-

    (CBS) It was déjà vu all over again on Sunday for the Bears.

    The Packers win the toss and march (no, really fly) 80 yards in eight plays, with five first downs, and, of course, seven points. Go ahead and blame the defense if you must for coming out flat and unprepared, blame the offense if you’d like for being perpetually inept.

    I’ll blame the general manager.

    Certainly, I can’t be the only one who wonders why Jerry Angelo is still calling the shots for the Bears. It’s not like he’s new to this job; his tenure pre-dates the iPod. What exactly has Angelo done to make him the fifth most tenured GM in the league? The answer to that question is a mystery, as his hits are greatly outweighed by his misses. Let’s look at the facts.

    Angelo maintains the Bears have a “draft-driven” philosophy to building their roster. Yet the numbers tell a different story. In his ten years on the job, Angelo:

    • has never drafted a Pro-Bowl offensive player;
    • has not drafted a Pro-Bowl position player since 2004 (making the Bears one of 10 teams in the NFL to carry this distinction);
    • drafted a mere three offensive lineman from 2003 through 2006 (one sixth and two seventh round afterthoughts, none of which are currently on the roster);
    • filled only three current roster spots from the 30 draft selections made from 2004 through 2007; and
    • generated a grand total of one current starter (left guard – and bust – Chris Williams) from eight first-round draft picks.

    That is just a small sample of the personnel-decision failures. Bear fans surely don’t need to be reminded of the fact that Troy Polamalu was selected two spots after Michael Haynes, or that Vincent Jackson was selected 22 spots after Mark Bradley, or that….okay, I’ll stop.

    Even Angelo’s greatest success, acquiring quarterback Jay Cutler, has also been his biggest failure. Angelo went out and made the bold move to acquire a quarterback with elite talent, yet he’s done nothing – nada – to protect and maximize the return on this investment. The Bears line up every week with a rag-tag group of offensive lineman who provide porous protection, and third-rate receivers who can’t create separation from defenders or catch the ball when it’s thrown to them. Angelo must be held accountable.

    Angelo claimed after watching quarterback Jay Cutler get battered in New Orleans: “We did everything you could possibly do to that [offensive line] position. Nobody did more than the Chicago Bears.” You heard right. Angelo and the Bears did “everything.” Here is what everything means in this context: drafting Gabe Carimi in the first-round and picking up free-agent Chris Spencer – who was a knee-jerk reaction to the failed negotiations with former Bear Olin Kreutz. When did everything become a synonym for next-to-nothing?

    What could Jerry Angelo have done if he really meant to do “everything,” and then went out and actually did it? Recall that this past off-season featured an unprecedented 667 free-agents. And further recall that the Bears were armed with ample salary cap space – reportedly $34M – to make multiple moves to bolster an offensive line that surrendered a league-high 56 sacks last season. If the Bears had truly done everything – or at least more than the next-to-nothing they did do – to improve the offensive line, they could line up this Sunday with some or all of the following free-agents:

    Jermon Bushrod, Davin Joseph, David Baas, Harvey Dahl, and Matt Light. Might that line be providing Jay Cutler with just a bit more protection?

    Giving Cutler time to throw a pass would be a step in the right direction, but how about giving Cutler some talent to catch his passes? Caving to Devin Hester’s contract demands back in 2008 and paying him like a number one wide receiver, doesn’t make Devin Hester a No. 1 wide receiver, yet that’s what Angelo tried to sell us on. When your quarterback looks to an undrafted, rookie free-agent, Dane Sanzenbacher, as a go-to guy in the red zone, that is a complete indictment of talent evaluation. And when your big off-season additions are a washed-up first-round bust, Roy Williams, and a special teams gunner, Sam Hurd, you’re clearly in denial about the talent-level of the current wide receiver corps.

    What’s really sad here – and, for Bears’ fans, tragic – is that Angelo’s inability to bring in offensive talent capable of competing on Sundays has wasted the prime years of Super Bowl-caliber defenses and special teams.

    Angelo spent much of his tenure with the Bears trying to assemble his own version of the 2002 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, a team that played smothering defense, and did just enough on offense to eek out a win. The Bears offense has ranked better than 26th in total offense just once in ten years under Angelo, in 2006 when they were 16th. Meanwhile, the defense has finished in the top 10 three times, and Devin Hester has established himself as the greatest kick returner in NFL history, providing envious field position that other teams would surely capitalize on.

    The NFL has experienced a fundamental shift to a passing league during Angelo’s tenure. Per usual, the Bears were late to the game, and their solution was to bring in offensive coordinator Mike Martz. This hiring, to borrow an Angelo-ism, was a square peg in a round hole. The Bears don’t have the blockers, receivers, or the quarterback with robot-like mechanics to sit in the pocket and wait for slow-developing pass routes to effectively run Martz’s scheme. So while Tom Brady is on pace to throw for 7,077 yards, the Bears are on pace to give up 75 sacks.

    This slow-to-evolve approach makes Jerry Angelo a lot like a fax machine.

    While the rest of the NFL elite operates in a digital age of multi-function machines that can scan and email at dizzying speeds, the Bears rely on antiquated technology that is near obsolete, and wonder why their weekend match-ups end up stalled like a paper jam.

    Ten years is a large enough body of work to realize that Jerry Angelo’s stewardship simply hasn’t and isn’t working for the Chicago Bears. And until you can add “former” to Angelo’s current general manager’s title, it will be more of the same for the Bears. Miring in mediocrity, catching a lucky streak here and there, only to fall short in the end.

    Oh, by the way, Jerry Angelo is signed through 2013, and his likely successor, Tim Ruskell, is already a part of the Bears’ front office. So, odds are it will be déjà vu all over again in 2012.

    http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2011/09/...-of-a-failure/

  9. #9
    I don't understand what's wrong with Angelo? He usually had good teams with the Bears. No matter who they hire, some of us are going to ***** and some of us are going to be happy.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Austin View Post
    It concerns me that he failed time and time again to get a franchise QB for the Bears (and no, I don't consider Jay Cutler a franchise QB) but we could certainly do worse -- he has experience and a proven track record.

    There would be a fan revolt if they promoted Cohen.
    Angelo doesn't believe O linemen have a place on the roster...at least good ones.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Austin View Post
    It concerns me that he failed time and time again to get a franchise QB for the Bears (and no, I don't consider Jay Cutler a franchise QB) but we could certainly do worse -- he has experience and a proven track record.

    There would be a fan revolt if they promoted Cohen.
    Well I guess you could say alot of Jet fans are revolting..

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by JetsFanatic View Post
    I don't understand what's wrong with Angelo? He usually had good teams with the Bears. No matter who they hire, some of us are going to ***** and some of us are going to be happy.
    He worked us over really well when we traded up for Dewayne Robertson....

  13. #13
    I had a feeling a veteran gm would have an impressive interview compared to candidates who haven't done the job before.

    Is it worth discussing momentums of a franchises past? The bears have traditionally done poor on offense as a franchise and no matter who is there they can't seem to turn it around. Angelo was part of this problem but he was just a guy In a long line that couldn't do it.

    Are we looking at someone who is truly unskilled as a gm, or someone that's victimized by the long standing tradition that has failed to be changed by anyone.

    What were some of this guys good and bad moves?

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by C Mart View Post
    Durkin: Jerry Angelo And The Anatomy Of A Failure

    September 28, 2011

    By Dan Durkin-

    (CBS) It was déjà vu all over again on Sunday for the Bears.

    The Packers win the toss and march (no, really fly) 80 yards in eight plays, with five first downs, and, of course, seven points. Go ahead and blame the defense if you must for coming out flat and unprepared, blame the offense if you’d like for being perpetually inept.

    I’ll blame the general manager.

    Certainly, I can’t be the only one who wonders why Jerry Angelo is still calling the shots for the Bears. It’s not like he’s new to this job; his tenure pre-dates the iPod. What exactly has Angelo done to make him the fifth most tenured GM in the league? The answer to that question is a mystery, as his hits are greatly outweighed by his misses. Let’s look at the facts.

    Angelo maintains the Bears have a “draft-driven” philosophy to building their roster. Yet the numbers tell a different story. In his ten years on the job, Angelo:

    • has never drafted a Pro-Bowl offensive player;
    • has not drafted a Pro-Bowl position player since 2004 (making the Bears one of 10 teams in the NFL to carry this distinction);
    • drafted a mere three offensive lineman from 2003 through 2006 (one sixth and two seventh round afterthoughts, none of which are currently on the roster);
    • filled only three current roster spots from the 30 draft selections made from 2004 through 2007; and
    • generated a grand total of one current starter (left guard – and bust – Chris Williams) from eight first-round draft picks.

    That is just a small sample of the personnel-decision failures. Bear fans surely don’t need to be reminded of the fact that Troy Polamalu was selected two spots after Michael Haynes, or that Vincent Jackson was selected 22 spots after Mark Bradley, or that….okay, I’ll stop.

    Even Angelo’s greatest success, acquiring quarterback Jay Cutler, has also been his biggest failure. Angelo went out and made the bold move to acquire a quarterback with elite talent, yet he’s done nothing – nada – to protect and maximize the return on this investment. The Bears line up every week with a rag-tag group of offensive lineman who provide porous protection, and third-rate receivers who can’t create separation from defenders or catch the ball when it’s thrown to them. Angelo must be held accountable.

    Angelo claimed after watching quarterback Jay Cutler get battered in New Orleans: “We did everything you could possibly do to that [offensive line] position. Nobody did more than the Chicago Bears.” You heard right. Angelo and the Bears did “everything.” Here is what everything means in this context: drafting Gabe Carimi in the first-round and picking up free-agent Chris Spencer – who was a knee-jerk reaction to the failed negotiations with former Bear Olin Kreutz. When did everything become a synonym for next-to-nothing?

    What could Jerry Angelo have done if he really meant to do “everything,” and then went out and actually did it? Recall that this past off-season featured an unprecedented 667 free-agents. And further recall that the Bears were armed with ample salary cap space – reportedly $34M – to make multiple moves to bolster an offensive line that surrendered a league-high 56 sacks last season. If the Bears had truly done everything – or at least more than the next-to-nothing they did do – to improve the offensive line, they could line up this Sunday with some or all of the following free-agents:

    Jermon Bushrod, Davin Joseph, David Baas, Harvey Dahl, and Matt Light. Might that line be providing Jay Cutler with just a bit more protection?

    Giving Cutler time to throw a pass would be a step in the right direction, but how about giving Cutler some talent to catch his passes? Caving to Devin Hester’s contract demands back in 2008 and paying him like a number one wide receiver, doesn’t make Devin Hester a No. 1 wide receiver, yet that’s what Angelo tried to sell us on. When your quarterback looks to an undrafted, rookie free-agent, Dane Sanzenbacher, as a go-to guy in the red zone, that is a complete indictment of talent evaluation. And when your big off-season additions are a washed-up first-round bust, Roy Williams, and a special teams gunner, Sam Hurd, you’re clearly in denial about the talent-level of the current wide receiver corps.

    What’s really sad here – and, for Bears’ fans, tragic – is that Angelo’s inability to bring in offensive talent capable of competing on Sundays has wasted the prime years of Super Bowl-caliber defenses and special teams.

    Angelo spent much of his tenure with the Bears trying to assemble his own version of the 2002 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, a team that played smothering defense, and did just enough on offense to eek out a win. The Bears offense has ranked better than 26th in total offense just once in ten years under Angelo, in 2006 when they were 16th. Meanwhile, the defense has finished in the top 10 three times, and Devin Hester has established himself as the greatest kick returner in NFL history, providing envious field position that other teams would surely capitalize on.

    The NFL has experienced a fundamental shift to a passing league during Angelo’s tenure. Per usual, the Bears were late to the game, and their solution was to bring in offensive coordinator Mike Martz. This hiring, to borrow an Angelo-ism, was a square peg in a round hole. The Bears don’t have the blockers, receivers, or the quarterback with robot-like mechanics to sit in the pocket and wait for slow-developing pass routes to effectively run Martz’s scheme. So while Tom Brady is on pace to throw for 7,077 yards, the Bears are on pace to give up 75 sacks.

    This slow-to-evolve approach makes Jerry Angelo a lot like a fax machine.

    While the rest of the NFL elite operates in a digital age of multi-function machines that can scan and email at dizzying speeds, the Bears rely on antiquated technology that is near obsolete, and wonder why their weekend match-ups end up stalled like a paper jam.

    Ten years is a large enough body of work to realize that Jerry Angelo’s stewardship simply hasn’t and isn’t working for the Chicago Bears. And until you can add “former” to Angelo’s current general manager’s title, it will be more of the same for the Bears. Miring in mediocrity, catching a lucky streak here and there, only to fall short in the end.

    Oh, by the way, Jerry Angelo is signed through 2013, and his likely successor, Tim Ruskell, is already a part of the Bears’ front office. So, odds are it will be déjà vu all over again in 2012.

    http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2011/09/...-of-a-failure/
    I was about to post, "isn't this the guy who ruined the Bears?" Thanks for answering.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by C Mart View Post
    Durkin: Jerry Angelo And The Anatomy Of A Failure

    September 28, 2011

    By Dan Durkin-

    (CBS) It was déjà vu all over again on Sunday for the Bears.

    The Packers win the toss and march (no, really fly) 80 yards in eight plays, with five first downs, and, of course, seven points. Go ahead and blame the defense if you must for coming out flat and unprepared, blame the offense if you’d like for being perpetually inept.

    I’ll blame the general manager.

    Certainly, I can’t be the only one who wonders why Jerry Angelo is still calling the shots for the Bears. It’s not like he’s new to this job; his tenure pre-dates the iPod. What exactly has Angelo done to make him the fifth most tenured GM in the league? The answer to that question is a mystery, as his hits are greatly outweighed by his misses. Let’s look at the facts.

    Angelo maintains the Bears have a “draft-driven” philosophy to building their roster. Yet the numbers tell a different story. In his ten years on the job, Angelo:

    • has never drafted a Pro-Bowl offensive player;
    • has not drafted a Pro-Bowl position player since 2004 (making the Bears one of 10 teams in the NFL to carry this distinction);
    • drafted a mere three offensive lineman from 2003 through 2006 (one sixth and two seventh round afterthoughts, none of which are currently on the roster);
    • filled only three current roster spots from the 30 draft selections made from 2004 through 2007; and
    • generated a grand total of one current starter (left guard – and bust – Chris Williams) from eight first-round draft picks.

    That is just a small sample of the personnel-decision failures. Bear fans surely don’t need to be reminded of the fact that Troy Polamalu was selected two spots after Michael Haynes, or that Vincent Jackson was selected 22 spots after Mark Bradley, or that….okay, I’ll stop.

    Even Angelo’s greatest success, acquiring quarterback Jay Cutler, has also been his biggest failure. Angelo went out and made the bold move to acquire a quarterback with elite talent, yet he’s done nothing – nada – to protect and maximize the return on this investment. The Bears line up every week with a rag-tag group of offensive lineman who provide porous protection, and third-rate receivers who can’t create separation from defenders or catch the ball when it’s thrown to them. Angelo must be held accountable.

    Angelo claimed after watching quarterback Jay Cutler get battered in New Orleans: “We did everything you could possibly do to that [offensive line] position. Nobody did more than the Chicago Bears.” You heard right. Angelo and the Bears did “everything.” Here is what everything means in this context: drafting Gabe Carimi in the first-round and picking up free-agent Chris Spencer – who was a knee-jerk reaction to the failed negotiations with former Bear Olin Kreutz. When did everything become a synonym for next-to-nothing?

    What could Jerry Angelo have done if he really meant to do “everything,” and then went out and actually did it? Recall that this past off-season featured an unprecedented 667 free-agents. And further recall that the Bears were armed with ample salary cap space – reportedly $34M – to make multiple moves to bolster an offensive line that surrendered a league-high 56 sacks last season. If the Bears had truly done everything – or at least more than the next-to-nothing they did do – to improve the offensive line, they could line up this Sunday with some or all of the following free-agents:

    Jermon Bushrod, Davin Joseph, David Baas, Harvey Dahl, and Matt Light. Might that line be providing Jay Cutler with just a bit more protection?

    Giving Cutler time to throw a pass would be a step in the right direction, but how about giving Cutler some talent to catch his passes? Caving to Devin Hester’s contract demands back in 2008 and paying him like a number one wide receiver, doesn’t make Devin Hester a No. 1 wide receiver, yet that’s what Angelo tried to sell us on. When your quarterback looks to an undrafted, rookie free-agent, Dane Sanzenbacher, as a go-to guy in the red zone, that is a complete indictment of talent evaluation. And when your big off-season additions are a washed-up first-round bust, Roy Williams, and a special teams gunner, Sam Hurd, you’re clearly in denial about the talent-level of the current wide receiver corps.

    What’s really sad here – and, for Bears’ fans, tragic – is that Angelo’s inability to bring in offensive talent capable of competing on Sundays has wasted the prime years of Super Bowl-caliber defenses and special teams.

    Angelo spent much of his tenure with the Bears trying to assemble his own version of the 2002 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, a team that played smothering defense, and did just enough on offense to eek out a win. The Bears offense has ranked better than 26th in total offense just once in ten years under Angelo, in 2006 when they were 16th. Meanwhile, the defense has finished in the top 10 three times, and Devin Hester has established himself as the greatest kick returner in NFL history, providing envious field position that other teams would surely capitalize on.

    The NFL has experienced a fundamental shift to a passing league during Angelo’s tenure. Per usual, the Bears were late to the game, and their solution was to bring in offensive coordinator Mike Martz. This hiring, to borrow an Angelo-ism, was a square peg in a round hole. The Bears don’t have the blockers, receivers, or the quarterback with robot-like mechanics to sit in the pocket and wait for slow-developing pass routes to effectively run Martz’s scheme. So while Tom Brady is on pace to throw for 7,077 yards, the Bears are on pace to give up 75 sacks.

    This slow-to-evolve approach makes Jerry Angelo a lot like a fax machine.

    While the rest of the NFL elite operates in a digital age of multi-function machines that can scan and email at dizzying speeds, the Bears rely on antiquated technology that is near obsolete, and wonder why their weekend match-ups end up stalled like a paper jam.

    Ten years is a large enough body of work to realize that Jerry Angelo’s stewardship simply hasn’t and isn’t working for the Chicago Bears. And until you can add “former” to Angelo’s current general manager’s title, it will be more of the same for the Bears. Miring in mediocrity, catching a lucky streak here and there, only to fall short in the end.

    Oh, by the way, Jerry Angelo is signed through 2013, and his likely successor, Tim Ruskell, is already a part of the Bears’ front office. So, odds are it will be déjà vu all over again in 2012.

    http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2011/09/...-of-a-failure/
    wow!!! ok dont feel as good about him..seems to be in same mold as rex all defense no offense approach..he was still able to build a conference champion no???

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by ARodFLKeysJetsFan View Post
    He worked us over really well when we traded up for Dewayne Robertson....
    And Tanny worked him over for Thomas Jones

  17. #17
    Interviewed for Jets GM position that Bradway eventually got..So Woody knows him..Excellent reputation as a scout..GM? I compared him to Bradway. A better scout than GM but Bears did have some early success under him...JMO

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerry_Angelo

    Early career
    Angelo began his career in the NFL as a scout for both the New York Giants and the Dallas Cowboys in the early 1980s. Four years later he moved on to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, a team that had experienced brief success. An expansion team established in 1976, the Buccaneers lost the 1979 NFC Championship Game to the Los Angeles Rams. What followed were a chaotic series of player tragedies and setbacks that sent the team into a slump. A succession of coaches and numerous roster changes failed to revive the team throughout the 1980s. Angelo was associated with the appearance of front office divisions and management mistakes. By the late 1990s his 14-year tenure in Tampa Bay was perceived as successful, as the Buccanneers made the playoffs three times from 1997–2000. With new ownership of the franchise, Angelo moved on to the Chicago Bears.

    Chicago Bears

    Angelo became the Chicago Bears' general manager in 2001.
    After firing Dick Jauron, Angelo sought a new coach. The short list was Nick Saban, Russ Grimm, and Lovie Smith. Nick Saban was the frontrunner, but wanted the GM powers Angelo just acquired. Saban went on to a short tenure with the Miami Dolphins prior to returning to college football. Russ Grimm was the second choice but was not hired.
    Lovie Smith was hired by Angelo as the coach of the Chicago Bears in 2004. The Bears went from 5–11 in 2004, to 11–6 in 2005 (including a playoff loss to the Carolina Panthers) to a team in 2006 that went 15–4 after losing Super Bowl XLI to the Indianapolis Colts. Angelo was ranked as the eighth best general manager in professional sports in February 2007.[3]
    Following the 2007 Super Bowl run, the Bears were mired in player personnel controversies. First, many players, media and fans were upset that head coach Lovie Smith was not given a contract extension, despite being the lowest paid head coach in the NFL and taking his team to the Super Bowl. The Bears eventually relented, granting Smith a 4 year extension after at times bitter negotiations. Then, Angelo traded his leading rusher and locker room favorite, Thomas Jones, plus the Bears 2nd round draft pick, for the Jets second round draft pick. Further dampering the Bears off-season was a prolonged contract battle with star linebacker Lance Briggs, who eventually had the franchise tag placed on him.

    2007

    The 2007 season saw the Bears go 7–9 and miss the playoffs. Angelo entered the offseason with the mentality that "free agency begins at home.[4]" Rather than pursuing the league's top free agents, Angelo focused the team's resources on securing players that were already members of the team, including Lance Briggs, Alex Brown, Tommie Harris, Kyle Orton, Rex Grossman, and Devin Hester.[5][6][7] He also chose to part with running back Cedric Benson, and replaced him with Matt Forte, whom the team drafted out of Tulane with the 44th overall pick of the 2008 NFL Draft.[8]

    2008

    The Chicago Bears drafted Chris Williams, a left offensive tackle from Vanderbilt University with the fourteenth overall pick of the 2008 NFL Draft. On 24 July 2008, the second day of the 2008 Chicago Bears Training Camp, Williams was forced to leave practice due to back spasms.[9] On 7 August 2008, Chris Williams underwent surgery to repair a herniated disk in his back.[10] The controversy began when on 24 August 2008, it became known that Chicago Bears doctors knew Chris Williams had a herniated disk in his back prior to drafting him, yet took an unwise and risky gamble and decided to draft him anyway.[11] Williams eventually began playing with the Bears in November,[12] but received a limited role.
    The 2008 Chicago Bears finished with a 9–7 record, and missed the playoffs after losing their season finale to the Houston Texans.[13] After the season conclusion, Angelo parted with many of the team's defensive coaches, and hired Rod Marinelli.[14] He also commented on the team's need to acquire a stable quarterback, dismissing rumors that Kyle Orton was the franchise's long-term solution.[15] In an interview in January 2009, he stated, “It’s all about the quarterback... You don’t win because of wide receivers. You don’t win because of running backs. You win because of the quarterback. We have to get that position stabilized. We’re fixated on that.”[16]

    2009

    In March 2009, Angelo, along with several other NFL teams, expressed interest in acquiring Pro Bowl quarterback Jay Cutler from the Denver Broncos. Cutler, who had spent three years with Denver, requested to be traded after head coach Josh McDaniels considered replacing him with Matt Cassel.[17][18] On April 2, Angelo made one of the biggest trades in the franchise's history by trading Kyle Orton, the Bears' first and third-round selections in 2009, and first-round pick in 2010 for Cutler, plus a fifth round pick.[19] On the same day, the Bears also signed seven-time Pro Bowl tackle Orlando Pace.[20] Despite the high profile trades, the Bears went 7-9 and again missed the playoffs. The Bears held a press-conference after the season to explain the team's future direction. Ted Phillips, the Bears president, confirmed that neither Angelo nor Lovie Smith would be dismissed for the teams disappointing finish.[21]

    2010

    A clause in the 2006 collective bargaining agreement with the NFL established that there would be no salary cap in 2010. Thus, teams would be able to spend as much money as they wanted towards their players' salaries without having to worry about penalties or restrictions. On the first day of free agency, the Bears signed Pro Bowl defensive end Julius Peppers, running back Chester Taylor, and tight end Brandon Manumaleuna.[22] Angelo hired Mike Martz to replace Ron Turner as the Bears offensive coordinator, and promoted defensive line coach Rod Marinelli to defensive coordinator.[23]

    2011

    Angelo was fired by the Bears on January 3, 2012. The reason for his firing was due to a combination of poor drafting and questionable free agent signings, with the team stating they wanted to "close a talent gap" to stay competitive with the rival Green Bay Packers and Detroit Lions in the NFC North.[24] He leaves with an 87-73 regular season record, and 3-4 playoff record as the Bears General Manager. He was succeeded by Phil Emery on January 29, 2012.
    Last edited by C Mart; 01-13-2013 at 11:55 AM.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by C Mart View Post
    And Tanny worked him over for Thomas Jones
    I don't think the Thomas Jones trade comes anywhere close to what we gave up to move up and select Dewayne Robertson.

  19. #19
    Wow, Angelos draft record is atrocious.

    I really think this would be an awful hire

  20. #20
    http://www.chicagonow.com/chicago-be...draft-history/

    ''In this writer’s opinion, there is no hiding it: Jerry Angelo is a bad GM. But, based on multiple reports citing team sources, it appears as if he is coming back for the 2012 season. Should this be the case, it will make Jerry the general manager for one of the most important drafts in recent Chicago Bears’ history.

    There are so many positions the Bears have to nail in this draft; so many players needed to fill a void. It will be impossible to come out with everything they need. But, with the right amount of luck and proper scouting and talent evaluation, they can come close.

    So, how do we know if we can expect that? It’s simple; let the record do the talking. Let’s take a look at the entire Chicago Bears’ draft history under Jerry’s regime, and then you can decide if you think the afore mentioned is possible. Grab the barf bag, people:

    2002 Draft Class

    1st: OL Marc Colombo - Couldn't stay healthy in Chicago, but went on to have a solid career in Dallas.
    3rd: DB Roosevelt Williams - I’m not even sure who he is.
    3rd: OL Terrence Metcalf - Somehow, Metcalf stuck on the roster for 9 seasons, despite being terrible. Now out of the NFL.
    4th: DE Alex Brown - Very solid late round pick. Good defensive end for a long time, and should have never been cut.
    5th: DB Bobby Gray - Another bad defensive back that never did anything in the NFL.
    5th: LB Bryan Knight - Yeah, who's this guy? He’s no longer in the NFL, and only lasted two seasons.
    6th: RB Adrian Peterson - A utility player for the most part. Good on special teams, and was a good back up running back.
    6th: WR Jamin Elliot - Never caught a pass.
    6th: TE Bryan Fletcher - Never played a down for the Bears, and was out of the league shortly after.
    2003 Draft Class

    1st: DE Michael Haynes - A continuation of the 1st round Angelo busts.
    1st: QB Rex Grossman - No need for an explanation here. Good Rex, bad Rex turned out to be a solid back up in the NFL today.
    2nd: DB Charles Tillman - Maybe Angelo's best pick ever. Tillman has proven to be the best corner in Bears history, and he notched his first Pro Bowl ever this year.
    3rd: LB Lance Briggs: Another great Angelo pick. Briggs will go down as a top 10 Bears linebacker ever. Seven straight Pro Bowl seasons.
    4th: Todd Johnson - Not the worst player in the world, just nothing special. Decent back up, and a solid special teams contributor. Out of the NFL.
    4th: DT Ian Scott - Not a great player, but in a defensive line rotation, he could contribute a bit. Nothing special. Now out of the NFL.
    5th: WR Bobby Wade- This guy got cut because he fumbled punt returns, and he was a bad receiver. Bad pick.
    5th: WR Justin Gage: Never did anything on the Bears, and couldn't catch a pass with his stone hands. Found some life on the Titans, but nothing to hoot and holler about.
    5th: DL Tron LaFavor - Zero sacks in his NFL career.
    6th: LB Joe Odom - Never saw any playing time after the Bears got rid of him.
    6th: RB Brock Forsey - Two years, two teams, and is now out of the NFL.
    7th: WR Bryan Anderson - I have no clue who this even was, and apparently he never made a roster.
    2004 Draft Class

    1st: DT Tommie Harris - For 3 years, Harris was the most dominant defensive tackle in the league. Unfortunately, he had horrible injuries and bad knees. Good guy, and a great player for the first few years.
    2nd: DT Tank Johnson - Everyone remembers the weapons he had. But when Tommie went down in 2006, Johnson played a key role in the Bears going to the Superbowl.
    3rd: WR Bernard Berrian - It's safe to say, Rex Grossman made Berrian. Got him a big contract, and then he disappeared. One trick pony.
    4th: DB Nathan Vasher - Had a few good seasons, making the most of poorly throw passes. Got a probowl out of him, and then he turned out to be horrible in coverage. Injuries killed Vasher.
    4th: LB Leon Joe - Never did anything, now out of the NFL.
    5th: DL Claude Harriott - Who?
    5th: QB Craig Krenzel - I'm not even going to remind you, I don't think thats necessary.
    7th DB Alfonso Marshall – Uhhh ... Who?
    2005 Draft Class

    1st: RB Cedric Benson - Bust (For the Bears at least).
    2nd: WR Mark Bradley - A big time reach, for a receiver that barely did anything in college. Blew out his knee in 2005 and that was the end of Bradley.
    4th: QB Kyle Orton - Everyone and their brother knows about the Kyle Orton era. He turned out to be a solid, capable starter. Not a franchise by any means, but he’s a guy who you can win with.
    5th: WR Airese Currie - All the hype around this guy and his speed, never got him on the field.
    6th: DB Chris Harris - Solid player in the NFL for a while. Harris was a good pick, who helped contribute immediately.
    7th: DB Rodriques Wilson - Good special teams player, but was never anything more than that.
    2006 Draft Class

    2nd: DB Danieal Manning - Lovie moved Manning around every year, and he played well at each position. Good nickel back, and in his final year, turned into a solid strong safety. Also turned out to be one of the best kick returners in the NFL.
    2nd. DB Devin Hester - Most thought that he would be nothing but a kick and punt returner. Well, that’s what he is...but he’s the best to ever do it.
    3rd: DT Dusty Dvoracek - Dusty couldn't stay healthy, and never contributed that much when he was. Wasted pick.
    4th: LB Jamar Williams - Williams never amounted to anything in the NFL. Currently not on a roster.
    5th: Mark Anderson - Anderson burst onto the scene with 12.5 sacks in his rookie year, but fell off after that. Has found new life in New England, but never did anything else on the Bears post 2006.
    6th: RB J.D. Runnels - Never saw any action in the regular season.
    6th: G Tyler Reed - Who?
    2007 Draft Class

    1st: TE Greg Olsen - Was becoming Cutlers best friend until Mike Martz arrived, and was traded for a 3rd round pick. Very good pass catching tight end.
    2nd: DE Dan Bazuin - With the 2nd round pick they got for Thomas Jones, they drafted Bazuin. Needless to say, Bazuin never saw the field.
    3rd: RB Garrett Wolfe - Big time reach for a miniature running back. Made special teams plays, and got arrested in the off-season.
    3rd: LB Michael Okwo - I still don't remember ever seeing Okwo on the field. Not in the NFL anymore.
    4th: OG Josh Beekman - Was drafted to be the future center, then they made him a guard...then he was a center...and then he was cut.
    5th: DB Kevin Payne - Payne made a few plays in his time in Chicago, but ended up just being bad. Got cut by the Bears, and picked up by St. Louis. Ultimately, he couldn't stay healthy at all. Not in the NFL.
    5th: DB Corey Graham - Graham played well when he was asked to start in 2008, and is a big time star on special teams. Graham is the best gunner in the league, and even made plays when inserted at nickel back this season. Notched his first Pro Bowl this season.
    7th: DB Trumaine McBride - Never amounted to much in the NFL, but is still floating around a roster somewhere.
    7th: Aaron Brant - Seriously, I've never even heard of this guy until now. Lets just say, hes not in the NFL ... or ever really was.
    2008 Draft Class

    1st: OT Chris Williams - Came in hurt, and bad at left tackle. Has found new life at left guard, but overall is a bust. The Bears drafted him to be a left tackle, and hes now a left guard.
    2nd: RB Matt Forte - A rare great offensive pick for Angelo. Got his first probowl season this year, and is on his way to a nice contract. But according to reports, the reason the Bears drafted him, is because Lovie wanted him and pushed for him.
    3rd: WR Earl Bennett - Best Bears receiver in a long time. Jay's go to guy, and someone who is a real wide receiver. Just inked a nice extension.
    3rd: DT Marcus Harrison - Constantly fat and out of shape.
    4th: DB Craig Steltz - Not a starter, but has proven to be good safety depth.
    5th: DB Zack Bowman - Consistently getting beat for big touchdowns. Complete waste.
    5th: TE Kellen Davis - Hasn't contributed too much, but 9 of his 28 career catches are touchdowns. Hasn't been able to show if he can do anything since he's in a Mike Martz offense.
    7th: DE Ervin Baldwin - Never contributed.
    7th: OG Chester Adams - Adams never once got onto the field.
    7th: LB Joey LaRocque - Currently not employed in the NFL.
    7th: OT Kirk Barton - Yet another guy who couldn't even stick on a roster.
    7th: WR Marcus Monk - Went back to college and played basketball.
    Throwing up yet?

    2009 Draft Class

    3rd: Jaron Gilbert - This guy could jump out of a pool, but couldn't shed a block.
    3rd: Juaquin Iglesias - Never saw any action on the field, and has yet to record a catch in the NFL.
    4th: DE Henry Melton - Having himself a solid year, statistically. Lovie and the gang changed his position to defensive tackle, and hes excelled at times.
    4th: DB D.J. Moore - Very good nickel back, and is probably the best blitzer the Bears have on the roster. Good later round find by Angelo.
    5th: WR Johnny Knox - One of the most frustrating players in recent Bears history. With speed that makes your head spin, he just leaves you scratching your head at times. After getting hurt this season, who knows if he will ever play again.
    5th: LB Marcus Freeman - Angelo has a history of finding bad linebackers that don't even make a roster.
    6th: DB Al Afalava - Showed flashes here and there, but ultimately was cut. No longer on an NFL roster.
    7th: OG Lance Louis - Louis has turned into a solid player. He has looked good at right guard, and even at right tackle from time to time. Worth keeping on the roster moving forward.
    7th: WR Derek Kinder - Yeah, this guy isn't in the NFL.
    2010 Draft Class

    3rd: DB Major Wright - He left college early because he was going to get replaced, and hasn't done much at the next level. Wright hasn't been able to stay healthy, and is very inconsistent.
    4th: DE Corey Wootton - outside of ending Favre's career, Wootton hasn't been healthy enough to even know what the Bears have in him.
    5th: DB Joshua More - Hasn't done anything in the NFL.
    6th: QB Dan LeFevour - Didn't make the Bears roster.
    7th: OT J'Marcus Webb - Is Webb the future left tackle? No way, but he has been solid. For a 7th round pick, this has been an okay pick.
    2011 Draft Class

    1st: OT Gabe Carimi - Season was ended by a knee injury, giving Bears fans visions of Marc Columbo all over again.
    2nd: DT Stephen Paea - The Bears traded up to get this guy, and he has looked okay at times. Seems like they might have found themselves a good defensive tackle moving forward. The jury is still out.
    3rd: DB Chris Conte - After the horrible play of the Bears safeties, Conte was forced into action early. He has looked okay, but had his season ended by an injury. Conte might be an okay player moving forward, but he's nothing to hang your hat on.
    5th: QB Nathan Enderle - Martz wanted this kid in the draft, and hes the typical big slow Mike Martz quarterback. But he hasn't seen the field since Jay got hurt, and will be gone once Martz is gone.
    6th. LB J.T. Thomas - Rookie season was ended by an injury, and he now rests on injured reserve.
    Total draft picks: 82

    Still on the roster: 22

    That number is staggering. How on earth is Angelo still the Bears general manager? This doesn't even include his free agency issues. Jerry is completely inept at drafting, and he needs to go.

    The Bears need too many positions to even fill, and if they miss on more than one pick in 2012, the organization will be set back for a long time. Look at the Packers, most of their starters and stars are draft picks. Now look where they are in the NFL. Take a look at where the Bears are without Jay Cutler. That says enough right there to fire the GM.

    Chicago needs a number 1 wide receiver, a left tackle, Urlacher's replacement, another real cornerback, a tight end, a defensive tackle, a strong side linebacker, a strong and a free safety … and then some. My head’s spinning.''

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