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Thread: Meanwhile, This is Happening... (Hackers vs. USA)

  1. #1
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    Meanwhile, This is Happening... (Hackers vs. USA)

    Still formulating an opinion on this one, working through the info. Just curious on your takes... The one thing I do know, is that the gubmint isn't going to be able to match these nerds from a technical perspective. This really could be a threat.

    http://www.cnn.com/2013/01/26/tech/a...html?hpt=hp_t1

    (CNN) -- In anger over the recent death of an Internet activist who faced federal charges, hackers claiming to be from the group Anonymous threatened early Saturday to release sensitive information about the U.S. Department of Justice.
    They claimed to have one such file on multiple servers ready for immediate release.
    The hackers apparently hijacked the website of the U.S. government agency responsible for federal sentencing guidelines, where they posted a message demanding the United States reform its justice system or face incriminating leaks to select news outlets.
    The lengthy, eloquently written letter was signed "Anonymous."
    The suicide of Internet activist Aaron Swartz on January 11 triggered the posting of the hackers' message to the web address of the United States Sentencing Commission, they said.
    His death, which they blamed on the justice system, "crossed a line," the letter said.
    How Aaron Swartz helped build the Internet
    A YouTube video accompanied the message, and made use of images from Cold War nuclear scenarios and games of strategy. The letter contained nuclear metaphors to refer to chunks of embarrassing information.
    The hackers said they have obtained "enough fissile material for multiple warheads," which it would launch against the justice department and "its associated executive branches."
    'Anonymous' threatens Westboro Baptist
    It gave the "warheads" the names of U.S. Supreme Court justices, such as Thomas.Warhead1 after justice Clarence Thomas or Ginsburg.Warhead1 after justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg.
    Anonymous accused the FBI of infiltrating its ranks and claimed the federal government is applying "highly disproportionate sentencing" to ruin the lives of some of its members.
    Swartz, 26, was facing federal computer fraud charges and could have served 35 years in prison. Anonymous said he "was killed," because he "faced an impossible choice."
    His family has issued a statement saying that federal charges filed over allegations that he stole millions of online documents contributed to Swartz's decision to take his own life. The files were mostly scholarly papers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    Opinion: Why the Net grieves Aaron Swartz
    Swartz's suicide has inspired a flurry of online tributes and mobilized Anonymous, the loosely defined collective of so-called "hacktivists" who oppose attempts to limit Internet freedoms. Both Swartz and Anonymous have been stark proponents of open access to information and open-source programming.
    A review of a cached version of the USSC.gov website showed the Anonymous message on its homepage since at least 1:40 a.m. ET. Efforts to get to the website were unsuccessful by some by 6 a.m. E.T.
    Anonymous also posted an editable version of the website, inviting users to deface it as they pleased. Multiple pages -- not only the home page -- appeared to allow users to alter them.
    The "warhead" names appeared as links, most leading to 404 error messages of pages not found, but some leading to pages of raw programming code.
    CNN has left multiple messages with the USSC requesting a response to the hack.
    The hackers said they chose the sentencing commission's website because of its influence on the doling out of sentences they consider to be unfair

  2. #2
    JetsInsider.com Legend
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    the problem with all this is that Swartz is no hero or martyr material.

    He clearly and blatantly broke the law. He also could have accepted a highly reduced sentence they were offering.

    To say he was "killed" is so far from the truth that it make Anonymous look bad.

    Anonymous is wonderful when you agree with them, but when you don't they tend to look like evil bullies.

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    Sunlight.

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    Swartz was nothing more than an Internet geek nerd who was too much of a pu$$y to face the time. Anon should be ashamed of themselves for defending him. But then again that's what Anon is filled with. Bunch of computer geeks who got stuffed in lockers too many times and are out to show the world now how tough they are behind a desk and keyboard.

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    Schwartz connected a laptop to an MIT computer closet, through which he was able to access a database and downloaded files from, mostly journals, periodicals, primary source materials, vast amounts of knowledge which he believed are documents that belong to the public. (Most would agree, but few libraries and even huge universities have the resources to store this amount of material. Instead they all pay a fee to this database which allows them to access these files. I remember using JSTOR all the time when I was in college) He would then take his laptop home, copy the files, and go back for more.

    Both and MIT and JSTOR (the actual database owners) declined to press any charges against Schwartz.

    The Department of Justice did not share this point of view. He was facing life in prison essentially if he'd been convicted on just 2 of the 59 counts he was charged with by the DOJ.

    Violent rapists, child murderers, drug traffickers, pedofiles face less serious consequences than this person did.

    I praise the work of Anonymous.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ha Ha Ha View Post
    Schwartz connected a laptop to an MIT computer closet, through which he was able to access a database and downloaded files from, mostly journals, periodicals, primary source materials, vast amounts of knowledge which he believed are documents that belong to the public. (Most would agree, but few libraries and even huge universities have the resources to store this amount of material. Instead they all pay a fee to this database which allows them to access these files. I remember using JSTOR all the time when I was in college) He would then take his laptop home, copy the files, and go back for more.

    Both and MIT and JSTOR (the actual database owners) declined to press any charges against Schwartz.

    The Department of Justice did not share this point of view. He was facing life in prison essentially if he'd been convicted on just 2 of the 59 counts he was charged with by the DOJ.

    Violent rapists, child murderers, drug traffickers, pedofiles face less serious consequences than this person did.

    I praise the work of Anonymous.
    It does appear to be an overly aggressive response by the government. Isn't it obvious why?

  7. #7
    JetsInsider.com Legend
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ha Ha Ha View Post
    Schwartz connected a laptop to an MIT computer closet, through which he was able to access a database and downloaded files from, mostly journals, periodicals, primary source materials, vast amounts of knowledge which he believed are documents that belong to the public. (Most would agree, but few libraries and even huge universities have the resources to store this amount of material. Instead they all pay a fee to this database which allows them to access these files. I remember using JSTOR all the time when I was in college) He would then take his laptop home, copy the files, and go back for more.

    Both and MIT and JSTOR (the actual database owners) declined to press any charges against Schwartz.

    The Department of Justice did not share this point of view. He was facing life in prison essentially if he'd been convicted on just 2 of the 59 counts he was charged with by the DOJ.

    Violent rapists, child murderers, drug traffickers, pedofiles face less serious consequences than this person did.

    I praise the work of Anonymous.
    Just stop, he was offered a plea deal of 4 months in jail.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JetPotato View Post
    It does appear to be an overly aggressive response by the government. Isn't it obvious why?
    I would agree on that. Reminds me of the sentencing standards for bank robbery. And it's not just government, but corporations as well, who have an absolute terror of this sort of hacking. In end, human nature will not change, just the forms of communication. Every organization will have its "off the grid" conversations/communications to avoid an electronic trail. Wasn't that how Battlestar Galactica survived the Cylon attack, by being off the grid?

    It's strange. I certainly see the merits of a free, fully accessible internet, and the desire for more transparency in the centers of power in our society. Just not seeing how you correspond that with violating privacy and shattering security measures of an organization. But it does make for some interesting revelations...

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    The problem with thinking all content should be free totally disregards the motivation for someone creating and making that content available which is profit. If people can't make money in writing, painting, movie making, music, etc, far fewer will bother to do so.

    That being said the sentences are out of whack compared with other crimes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trades View Post
    The problem with thinking all content should be free totally disregards the motivation for someone creating and making that content available which is profit. If people can't make money in writing, painting, movie making, music, etc, far fewer will bother to do so.

    That being said the sentences are out of whack compared with other crimes.
    Do we really need the music that's made for money anyway?

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    Quote Originally Posted by JetPotato View Post
    It does appear to be an overly aggressive response by the government. Isn't it obvious why?
    In today's America, I reckon if one connected a computer to a federal government agency's data center and stole/copied information, you would face far less severe consequences.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trades View Post
    The problem with thinking all content should be free totally disregards the motivation for someone creating and making that content available which is profit.
    I mostly agree with this


    Quote Originally Posted by Trades View Post
    If people can't make money in writing, painting, movie making, music, etc, far fewer will bother to do so.

    That being said the sentences are out of whack compared with other crimes.
    I disagree with this

  13. #13
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    First, I'm certain the US govt has recruited cyber warriors (probably just as many sticks as carrots to battle groups like Anonymous. Even Kevin Mitnick is behaving now. Plus, how else would you explain Stuxnet and Flame?

    And praising Anonymous is silly. They're misguided immature criminals. Their claims to want to right the wrongs of the world is arrogant. They made themselves judge and jury? No thanks.

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