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Thread: Can you continue to pay psl just not renew tickets

  1. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jets337 View Post
    Just wondering where did you get your information for the average ticket prices in 2000 and 2009?
    As a season ticket holder, I remember what I paid.

    $75.00 was the price on my mezzanine seats in GS in 2001 when I got my tickets, were $110.00 in 2009 when they shut the place down. Upper deck seats were cheaper, lower level seats were more expensive, mezzanine was usually the mean. Using an inflation calculator, you're looking at a $20-$30 increase over a 12 year period accounting for inflation, quite reasonable considering the price increases of MLB, NBA, and NHL tickets and the fact that we've got a new stadium.

    Takeaway's: 1. Ticket prices are not "out of control" 2. PSL's as another $8-$13 per ticket for a new stadium is not a hardship either.

    SAR I
    Last edited by SAR I; 02-13-2013 at 10:14 PM.

  2. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by SAR I View Post
    As a season ticket holder, I remember what I paid.

    $75.00 was the price on my mezzanine seats in GS in 2001 when I got my tickets, were $110.00 in 2009 when they shut the place down. Upper deck seats were cheaper, lower level seats were more expensive, mezzanine was usually the mean. Using an inflation calculator, you're looking at a $20-$30 increase over a 12 year period accounting for inflation, quite reasonable considering the price increases of MLB, NBA, and NHL tickets and the fact that we've got a new stadium.

    Takeaway's: 1. Ticket prices are not "out of control" 2. PSL's as another $8-$13 per ticket for a new stadium is not a hardship either.

    SAR I
    You're only going on 1 price area. I have had mine since 1991 upper deck corner end zone seats when seats were peanuts. In 1996 tickets were $25 a ticket and no preseason. Then in 1997 they went to $30 when we got Parcells and we started to see prices go up $5 a season once in a while $10.

    I am staying at my parents house recovering from a third surgery on my leg and on my wall is a playoff ticket from 1998 $58 for my seat. That is a long time ago. I dug into my drawer where I started to stash a lot of my stubs. I can't pull them all out since I can't move well but I pulled a ticket stub from 2005 at $60 a ticket, 2006 at $65 and 2007 at $70. From 2005 to 2010 my seats went up by $35. If you want to go back 10 years in 2000 I can look but I am pretty sure they were around $50 so from 2000 to 2009 there was a $25 jump but 2000 to 2010 was more like a $45 jump.

    You're correct you're mezanine A seats had a small $15 jump from 2009 to 2010 but the rest of the stadium saw a much different price jump. Lower level end zones in 2009 were $80 or $85. They went up by 50% in 2010 to $120. Upper deck prime seats were $80 and jumped by over 50% to $125. Sideline non club seats went up from 2009 to 2010 by 30%.

    You got lucky your seats only took a $10 price hike from 2009 to 2010 and you have one of the best value PSLs in the stadium. For a lot of other people the prices were a bit too much too handle. While you look at the PSL as $8-$13 a game, some looked at it based on the finance charges each game as $37.50 for a mezzanine A PSL which made a $120 ticket now $157.50

    I am not here saying the sky is falling and I have upper deck season tickets because at the point I'm at in life a down payment on a condo made more sense and I don't believe in financing anything other than real estate or a vehicle. I also believe people should buy what they want so I don't judge people other than when they cry that they bit off more than they could chew. Just showing that prices did take a huge hike in a lot of areas. We also now have one of the most expensive tickets in the NFL.

  3. #143
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    Decided to check out craigslist. If you type in Jets PSL you will find a few for sale. The guy earleir who was looking to walk away from his maybe you want to check there too. No ebay fees then.

    Anyways SAR here is one I know you would like if it were about 14 rows closer.

    http://jerseyshore.craigslist.org/tix/3616014988.html

  4. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jets337 View Post
    Decided to check out craigslist. If you type in Jets PSL you will find a few for sale. The guy earleir who was looking to walk away from his maybe you want to check there too. No ebay fees then.

    Anyways SAR here is one I know you would like if it were about 14 rows closer.

    http://jerseyshore.craigslist.org/tix/3616014988.html
    He is asking about 100% higher than the current resale market

    Mezz A is as cheap at $1,000 each, Mezz B I have seen selling for $750 each.

    http://www.pslsource.com/buy_new_york_jets_psl/

  5. #145
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    NFL Panthers PSL Owners Publish Letter To Owner Richardson

    Published December 17, 2012

    A group calling itself the "Perturbed Panther PSL Owners Federation" writes an open letter to NFL Panthers Owner Jerry Richardson in the form of a full-page ad in today's Charlotte Observer. The group states it is "writing to call a regrettable personal foul on the most tenured and venerable member of the Carolina Panthers organization – YOU!" It adds that PSL owners in '95 paid $368M (2012 dollars) to build the team's home stadium, and compares the team's business model to that of a "Pyramid Scheme."

    The letter goes on to state, "As business executives for many years ourselves, we know that if the Panthers were a company accountable to its public investors, with a perennial performance record that resembled your win-loss record, its board of directors would have a crisis on their hands. ... We are convinced the Panthers true potential and, worse, our community pride are being forfeited in favor of squeezing out more profits. We want you to run this team like a competitive enterprise rather than a monopoly" (CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, 12/17).

  6. #146
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    PSL Fees At New Vikings Stadium Expected To Be Priced In Line With Other Local Teams

    Published November 19, 2012
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    The Vikings and the MSFA will work together on seat fees at the new stadium
    A Minnesota official overseeing the new Vikings stadium on Friday said that she "expects personal seat licenses to be priced in line with fees charged at the Twins' Target Field and the University of Minnesota's TCF Bank Stadium -- if the team pursues the fees to help pay its share of the $975 million construction cost," according to Martiga Lohn of the AP. The Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority Chair Michele Kelm-Helgen, whose organization signs off on major stadium decisions as it is being built, said that the authority and Vikings will "work together on seat fees." Kelm-Helgen said, "What people were reacting to is $20,000, $30,000, $40,000 a seat. If they had that in their mind vs. something in the thousands perhaps." She added, "Our frame of reference has been things like at the Twins stadium and the Gophers' TCF Stadium." The Twins "charged $1,000 to $2,000 on a small number of premium seats at Target Field" while UM "charges season ticket buyers at TCF Stadium an annual fee of $100 to $500" (AP, 11/16). In Minneapolis, Lee Schafer writes it was "a little painful to watch the Wilfs ... get pounded last week for simply using basic business common sense." What the Vikings owners "are pursuing is not some sort of East Coast sharp-elbows trick of real estate tycoons." It is "common sense, the kind of thing the owners of a rental duplex would get in five seconds." Financing the deal "by using cash flow from the deal." Schafer wrote, "At least try them." Schafer: "I am not sure how a governor makes a big issue out of a situation one week and then quietly drops his objections later, but that is what should happen here" (Minneapolis STAR TRIBUNE, 11/18).

  7. #147
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    Woody Johnson Defends Jets' Trade For Tebow, Denies PSL Sales As Motivation

    Published November 16, 2012
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    Johnson denounced Jets players anonymously commenting on the team
    NFL Jets Owner Woody Johnson on Thursday “opted not to offer a vote of confidence” for GM Mike Tannenbaum, coach Rex Ryan, QB Mark Sanchez or “pretty much anyone connected to what is being widely portrayed as a dysfunctional team,” according to Tom Pedulla of the N.Y. TIMES. Johnson “denounced those who have suggested that the arrival” of backup QB Tim Tebow was “designed, at least in part, to help the team sell personal seat licenses.” Johnson said, “There’s this phony story about me being more concerned with PSL’s or cash. My job, one, two and three, is to win games. That’s why I got into football. My job is to win games. That’s what my passion is. That’s what I want to do. It’s not to sell PSL’s or hot dogs.”

  8. #148
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    How teams can best manage season-ticket-holder relocation

    Published July 16, 2012, Page 15


    Kevin Shulman is not entirely happy about MetLife Stadium.

    Born and raised in New Jersey, Shulman has been a New York Jets season-ticket holder for almost half a century — an “original sinner,” as he told me. He and his family had seven seats in rows 3 and 4 at the Meadowlands, just behind the Jets’ bench.

    When the new Jets stadium came along, Shulman says, “For 46 years of loyalty, I got a gun put to my head.”

    Shulman was paying $125 per game for each of his seats before the new construction project was completed. The new price tag for MetLife Stadium? Seven personal seat licenses at $35,000 each, game tickets at $350 each, and instead of being in the third row from the field, his seats are now nine rows from the top of the lower bowl. “Every single game I go to, I resent it,” Shulman says.

    Ouch.

    For those who are building new stadiums, the danger of alienating longtime supporters is one of the most delicate situations to address. How can teams best deal with the imminent displacement of many of their best fans when a new stadium is built?

    RELOCATION ADVICE

    ■ Market research: Teams must be sure they understand what they should be charging relative to the market and to others with similar situations and venues.

    ■ Communication strategy: Current supporters should be the first to know about new developments, new opportunities. Teams must over-communicate through multiple channels (email, online, snail mail, phone calls).

    ■ Human touch: Fans want personalized treatment, especially if they’re feeling displaced. Proactive, one-on-one interaction is critical.

    ■ The right people: From the sales staff to the customer service staff and support roles, train them well, and cross-train on operations, service, and sales so that each one can field questions and act when necessary.

    ■ Lead time: The displaced season-ticket holder can’t feel rushed or bullied; give that person information and space to make an informed decision, with enough lead time to give everyone the same courtesy.
    “There is no perfect solution,” says Rob Sullivan, senior vice president of consumer and premium sales and service for the Jets. Their 18-month process started in February of 2009, with a 30-page glossy “playbook” sent to each season-ticket holder — a good initial move, especially for older, more-traditional fans.

    “It was a lot of information to give them at one time,” says Sullivan in hindsight. “It was a good piece, but it had so much in it, it was overwhelming to some.”

    A website component was also created, using Ballena technology to allow people to view the seats’ sight lines. Season-ticket holders could either buy their seats over the phone or were invited to visit a special preview center at the construction site.

    About one in four chose to visit the site, but Sullivan says they underestimated the time fans would need to decide. “We had planned for 30 minutes each, but it took closer to 45 to 60. People had lots of questions, and we didn’t want to rush them.”

    To help fans understand the new PSL concept, Sullivan made sure the sales staff was well-trained in sales techniques as well as the details of the new stadium and the improved game-day experience the PSLs would ultimately provide.

    It’s easy to criticize after the fact, but overall, the Jets did a good job of communicating with their longtime supporters to help ease the pain of change. The reality is that passionate fans will often skew the best efforts of any team to clearly communicate, choosing instead to hear what they want to hear.

    The San Francisco 49ers are trying to avoid that perception, as they move from Candlestick Park to a new venue in nearby Santa Clara in 2014. Jamie Brandt, vice president of ticketing and suites for the 49ers, has been involved in similar projects at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa in 1998 and University of Phoenix Stadium in 2006.

    “Right or wrong, PSLs have had a bad rap ever since they were introduced in the mid-’90s,” says Brandt. “The key to the transition is communication: Give the fans an honest view of the situation, communicate the benefits, and make each season-ticket holder feel special in the process.”

    The Niners call their product a stadium builders license instead of a personal seat license — a good idea, adding to the perceived transparency to fans of what the money is for. The No. 1 communication tool they’re using is the official website dedicated to the project (www.NewSantaClaraStadium.com), along with emails, personalized letters and telephone calls.

    Dynamo fans hungry for a new stadium didn’t complain about price increases or seat relocation.
    Photo by: DON MURET / STAFF
    Passions are bound to run high in football, the nation’s No. 1 sport in fan avidity and cost per event, but is it easier to relocate fans of other sports? The answer appears to be yes — especially if you don’t have to sell a seat license.

    The Houston Dynamo unveiled its new, privately funded BBVA Compass Stadium in May without requiring fans to buy seat licenses. “We didn’t hear any complaints about price increases or being displaced,” says Steven Powell, the Dynamo’s executive vice president of business development.

    The franchise had been playing at Robertson Stadium on the campus of the University of Houston since its move from San Jose in December of 2005, and fans were hungry for a new facility. Indeed, the Dynamo’s inventory of 1,100 seats was sold out from marketing only to its current season-ticket-holder base.

    The Dynamo was also dedicated to over-communication. The team partnered with IOMedia to construct a virtual online venue (houstondynamo.io-media.com), and through a strong positive sales effort, according to Powell, the Dynamo was expected to have 12,000 season tickets sold when the team played its first match at its new home, more than double its prior season-ticket-holder count.

    The bottom line? A new stadium is a once-in-a-lifetime event for a fan, and passions are bound to run high, both positively and negatively. Start early, be transparent, train staff well, and communicate often to your best supporters, and most every fan-transition challenge can be minimized.

  9. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jets337 View Post
    You're only going on 1 price area. I have had mine since 1991 upper deck corner end zone seats when seats were peanuts. In 1996 tickets were $25 a ticket and no preseason. Then in 1997 they went to $30 when we got Parcells and we started to see prices go up $5 a season once in a while $10.

    I am not here saying the sky is falling and I have upper deck season tickets because at the point I'm at in life a down payment on a condo made more sense and I don't believe in financing anything other than real estate or a vehicle. I also believe people should buy what they want so I don't judge people other than when they cry that they bit off more than they could chew. Just showing that prices did take a huge hike in a lot of areas. We also now have one of the most expensive tickets in the NFL.
    First off, hope your leg is feeling better. Surgery sucks, hang in there.

    Agreed on all points, I was not thinking that the UD had such steep increases, does seem a bit harsh of the Jets to do that. I guess the good news if any is that the Jets have lowered UD seats last season, tickets in some locations are at 1999 prices adjusted for inflation.

    SAR I

  10. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alkrotraz View Post


    The San Francisco 49ers are trying to avoid that perception, as they move from Candlestick Park to a new venue in nearby Santa Clara in 2014. Jamie Brandt, vice president of ticketing and suites for the 49ers, has been involved in similar projects at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa in 1998 and University of Phoenix Stadium in 2006.

    “Right or wrong, PSLs have had a bad rap ever since they were introduced in the mid-’90s,” says Brandt. “The key to the transition is communication: Give the fans an honest view of the situation, communicate the benefits, and make each season-ticket holder feel special in the process.”

    The Niners call their product a stadium builders license instead of a personal seat license — a good idea, adding to the perceived transparency to fans of what the money is for. The No. 1 communication tool they’re using is the official website dedicated to the project (www.NewSantaClaraStadium.com), along with emails, personalized letters and telephone calls.

    Are the 49ers kidding with those escalators? Do any of these designers even contemplate how their space will be actually used?

    Only interesting/novel idea the 49ers had in this design is that the one side of the stadium will be the exclusive domain on the wealthy and luxury boxes. The UD on the other side looks like MetLife Stadium. The UD will completely blow.

  11. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by SAR I View Post
    The Jets play in the biggest market in America, and even with the Giants sharing the territory have millions of dedicated fans,

    The minute they give up the smokes, quit drinking, and shoot the dog is the minute they can lecture us on what 14,000 diehard Jets fans do with their fun money.

    SAR I
    LOL and yet only 14,000 out of millions have purchased PSLs. LOL Good one. LOL Man you are so FOS it ain`t funny anymore.

  12. #152
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    I like that scoreboard patio area.

    Seems as if the 49`ers are looking at what is wrong with Giants Stadium and probably gonna improve on it.
    Last edited by The Band; 02-14-2013 at 04:18 PM.

  13. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by SAR I View Post
    Good post, only think I'll tweak is this:

    StubHub is an exchange, but it's not establishing the "fair market value" for Jets seats. Since the vast majority of seats are bought and used at face value and only a small percentage make it to StubHub at all, StubHub is representative of the 'fair market value' for seats that owners need to get rid of due to other circumstances.

    In a typical week the most StubHub seats I've ever seen for sale has been ~11,000 and most weeks it's ~8,000. In a stadium that seats 82,500, simple math says that StubHub transacts ~10% of the seats in the place.

    So if my Mezz A corner section seats 200 fans, 180 of those fans will be loyal PSL owners attending the game at face value $125. Just because 20 fans were able to steal a few seats for $60 doesn't mean that that's the 'value' of the seats.

    SAR I
    the price someone is willing to pay for a ticket to a particular game will vary based on many criteria, from weather to opponent to time of game to how good the jets are. SH sets the equilibrium for the resale market, not the overall market, and that's an important distinction to make. STHs place more value on their seats which makes sense. those who purchase in the secondary market have different priorities in purchasing tickets which factors into these variances.

  14. #154
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    just checked out the prices for the 49`ers new stadium. Much more reasonable than what the Jets and Giants charged. Highest "PSL" they are charging is 12k and the highest ticket price is $200 in those 12k seats. Cheapest are 2k PSL and $85 a ticket for way up there. Probably as bad as Giants Stadium uppers and more expensive too. But there are some reasonable prices. They shouldn`t have a hard time like the Jets selling most, if not all.

  15. #155
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    LOL. Ray... you should change your screen name from the Banned to Crusader Rabbit. You are frothing again. Try not to obsess too much.

  16. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dcat View Post
    LOL. Ray... you should change your screen name from the Banned to Crusader Rabbit. You are frothing again. Try not to obsess too much.
    so you agree that a team with 5 Lombardi trophies charging far less than the Jets is a frothing situation for all of us? I like the design of that stadium too. Character, ya know? Something Giants Stadium totally lacks, unless it had a ROOF, walls, heat and air conditioning. :p

  17. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Band View Post
    just checked out the prices for the 49`ers new stadium. Much more reasonable than what the Jets and Giants charged. Highest "PSL" they are charging is 12k and the highest ticket price is $200 in those 12k seats. Cheapest are 2k PSL and $85 a ticket for way up there. Probably as bad as Giants Stadium uppers and more expensive too. But there are some reasonable prices. They shouldn`t have a hard time like the Jets selling most, if not all.
    And it is very expensive to live in SF, more expensive than it is to live in some of the nicer areas in and around NYC. So they didn't overtly take advantage of the whole cost of living paradigm like the Jets and Giants did!

  18. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Band View Post
    LOL and yet only 14,000 out of millions have purchased PSLs. LOL Good one. Man you are so FOS it ain`t funny anymore.
    Did you take mathematics in elementary school? Here, let me explain it to you.

    82,500 Seats
    -12,500 Club Seats
    -27,000 Upper Deck Seats
    ----------
    =43,000 PSL Seats

    43,000 divided by 3 Seats Per Average Owner = 14,333 PSL Owners

    Savvy?

    SAR I

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flushing Roots View Post
    And it is very expensive to live in SF, more expensive than it is to live in some of the nicer areas in and around NYC. So they didn't overtly take advantage of the whole cost of living paradigm like the Jets and Giants did!
    well thats one of the points I try to make. It`s a bunch of crap people saying, "well it costs more to live/work in NYC/NJ, therefore it costs more to build a stadium". The Jets and Giants both raped their fans of whatever the fans were willing to be raped of. The Jets got what they wanted. A stale atmosphere at their home games. Everyone is segregated by financial status now. In the seats and the parking lots. Jets games were awesome to attend years ago because no one gave a crap about financial status. We were ALL Jets fans. Now? It`s just a lame place to be and people are noticing it and leaving. The only person I know that is happy is SAR I. Yet he still complains about all the rich folks pissing on his car, puking all over the place, using foul language, burping and farting and eating tube steaks(I`m shocked to hear that people with money and those green parking passes do that sort of thing). The other happy camper I know of is sg3. Now he can mooch from wealthier tailgates as opposed to the blue collar tailgates that took very good care of him realizing he commuted to the games and didn`t ask him to be burdened by bringing anything but an appetite and a thirst. Oh well, I had as much fun as I possibly could have had being a STH for the Jets. It just isn`t what it once was. Certainly not worth the costs these days.

  20. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by SAR I View Post
    Did you take mathematics in elementary school? Here, let me explain it to you.

    82,500 Seats
    -12,500 Club Seats
    -27,000 Upper Deck Seats
    ----------
    =43,000 PSL Seats

    43,000 divided by 3 Seats Per Average Owner = 14,333 PSL Owners

    Savvy?

    SAR I
    That's funny, was going to submit the same facts as you when I saw his post, then I figured why bother. Idgiots, I think I said that earlier though.

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