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  1. #1
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    Arrow as of now...

    There seems to be a certain amount of confusion regarding the Darrelle
    Revis situation, the Jets' cap situation, restructuring contracts, and
    various and sundry other messy details. I'm going to attempt to address
    many of the most common misconceptions being spread by the media and
    others and shed some light on what is really going on. Read on if you
    can stand exploring some of the arcane details necessary for a better
    understanding of these issues.

    Myth #1: The Jets cannot restructure Mark Sanchez' contract (or fill in
    the blank with your favorite outsize contract) because he would be a
    fool to accept less money.

    Reality: Restructuring contracts more often than not does not involve
    the player accepting less money. It CAN, and sometimes does, but more
    often restructuring a contract leaves the total guaranteed $ in place.
    What happens is base salary (which is always fully applied to the
    current year salary cap) is converted into signing bonus (which can be
    spread out in equal annual amounts over up to 5 years). So, as an
    example, if player X has a 2013 contract with a base salary of $12
    million, all guaranteed, all of that $12 million would count against the
    2013 cap. But if we converted $10 million of it into a signing bonus,
    the cap hit for that $10 million would be spread out over 5 years,
    making the cap hit as follows: 2013 $4 million ($2 million in remaining
    base salary plus $2 million prorated signing bonus). 2014-2017 $2
    million each year in prorated signing bonus. Thus player X still gets
    all his guaranteed money, but the cap hit for 2013 is reduced from $12
    million to $4 million. If you really want to get creative, you can even
    delay payment of the signing bonus until 2014 (or later), further
    reducing the 2013 cap hit to just $2 million, at the cost of further
    extending the cap hit into later years.

    The point here is Sanchez (or anyone else) does not have to be a fool to
    restructure his contract and provide the Jets cap relief. Restructuring
    contracts need not cost the player a cent. Whether or not it is
    advisable for the Jets to push out the cap hits into later years is an
    entirely different issue. It may well be the Jets would be fools for
    restructuring certain contracts -- the players, however, should not have
    a problem with it. That brings us to...

    Myth #2: Santonio Holmes (or David Harris, or choose your favorite
    outsized contract) is untradable because his contract is so large no
    team would want to take it on.

    Reality: No player who still is capable of playing in the NFL is
    completely untradable. As we discussed above, any player can have his
    contract restructured. The acquiring team in a trade picks up base
    salary and any currently unearned roster, workout and reporting bonuses.
    All prorated signing bonuses stay with the team trading the player, and
    are immediately accelerated into the current cap year.

    Trading any player with any value as a player (i.e., maybe not Tebow, or
    Sanchez) is not impossible. You simply have to get the cap figure for
    the acquiring team down enough to make the player attractive at that cap
    figure. The way to do that is to convert base salary into signing
    bonus. So, as an example, Santonio Holmes has a 2013 cap figure of
    $12,500,000, with $11 million in base salary. Any team acquiring that
    contract would be taking on $11 million in cap space, too much for a
    player like Holmes. But convert say $8,000,000 of his base salary into a
    signing bonus, and the cap hit for the acquiring team becomes a very
    manageable $3 million. Just like that, an untradable player becomes
    eminently tradable.

    There are two caveats to this. First, doing a deal like this creates
    dead money. In the Holmes example, we now have $8 million on the cap
    which is going to a player no longer on the team -- dead money. It is
    not ideal, and you can only do so much of this kind of thing before half
    the cap is being spent on other teams' players, but in small doses for
    the right trades it works. The other caveat is that you have to convince
    the player to restructure. As a monetary matter this shouldn't be
    difficult, as the restructuring preserves all of the player's money and
    in fact gets it to him faster. However, the player in effect has a no
    trade clause, in that if he hates the idea of playing for the new team,
    he has only to refuse to restructure. In that case you either have to
    find a more palatable team to trade with or sweeten the pot for the
    player. In most cases it should be doable, if the Jets are highly
    motivated to get the deal done, but the player can and occasionally does
    throw up a roadblock to a trade.

    Myth #3: The Jets are in salary cap hell in 2013 and simply have no way
    of affording anything other than bargain basement players.

    Reality: The Jets can afford to be major players in the free agent
    market, if they are so inclined. The Jets right now are already under
    the cap by enough to afford their draft class and sign one pretty good
    free agent. If the Jets want to go all in for 2013, they have
    significant room under current contracts to restructure and create ample
    space under the cap. Sanchez, Harris, Holmes, Cromartie, Ferguson,
    Mangold collectively represent as much as $40 million in base salary,
    roster bonuses, workout bonuses and reporting bonuses that can be
    restructured into signing bonuses that are prorated, moving as much as
    $32 million into later years' cap. This may or may not be something the
    Jets should do, and it may or may not be something Idzik decides to do,
    but it is most definitely something the Jets CAN do. If the Jets only
    sign bargain basement players in 2013, it should be understood that this
    was a CHOICE the Jets made after considering what was in the best
    interests of the organization, not something forced on them by an
    impossible cap situation.

    Myth #4: The Jets cannot afford to re-sign Revis under the 2013 cap.

    Reality: Revis is signed through the end of 2013. Any extension will rip
    up the voidable years of his contract (2014-2016) and replace them with
    something much larger in $. But it will only effect the 2013 cap figure
    if the Jets choose to structure it this way. If the Jets choose it is
    not at all difficult to restructure in such a way that 2013 remains
    untouched. It is even possible, though unlikely, to restructure in a way
    that LOWERS the 2013 cap figure (for example, by converting some of his
    $6 million in base salary and non-proratable bonus money in 2013 into a
    signing bonus, and prorating this into future years). Affording Revis
    will not be easy, but the current cap situation should not pose any
    impediment to getting it done. And 2014 cap room is more than ample to
    fit Revis in. The Jets can afford Revis. The question is, do they want
    to?

    Myth #5: Sanchez's contract impacts the Jets' ability to fit Revis under the cap.

    Reality: Sanchez's contract is structured in such a way that all his
    guaranteed money will be paid out by the end of the 2013 season. By 2014
    the Jets can afford to cut Sanchez. Since Sanchez only has an outsize
    effect on the Jets cap in 2013, and a new Revis contract would only
    effect the Jets cap space in 2014 and beyond, the two are completely
    unrelated issues. So long as the Jets don't move most of Sanchez's cap $
    into 2014, Sanchez's contract will have no effect on the Jets' ability
    to fit Revis under the cap.



    Myth #6: If Revis is traded he will bring back a package of 2013 draft picks.

    Reality: It's possible but not probable.

    Revis is unlikely to be traded before the 2013 draft. Hereís why.

    First, he will not even be running until early April at the earliest.
    Thatís straight line running, no cuts. No doctor in the world can at
    that stage of the recovery accurately predict how the knee will hold up
    in game conditions, hence no meaningful medical approval is possible.
    All they can say is he is progressing reasonably well so far. Teams will
    want to see him actually play cornerback. AP is NOT a template.
    Peterson's recovery was such an outlier in terms of how quickly he came
    back it was pretty much a medical miracle. This is the gold standard of
    recoveries -- it is silly to think all future recoveries will follow the
    same miraculous course. Revis is already 2 1/2 months behind AP. Plus a
    significant % of guys NEVER return to their former form.

    Putting aside the health issues, which I think almost everyone is WAY
    too confident about, there is an even more fundamental reason Revis will
    not be traded for 2013 picks: his contract. If Revis is traded PRIOR to
    June 1st, all cap ramifications flow into the 2013 cap. Those
    ramifications are as follows: a net $4 million INCREASE to the Jets cap
    #, even after accounting for the trading partner picking up his base
    salary and roster bonus, due to the prorated bonus money which will be
    immediately accelerated. Bottom line, as of now Revis counts $9 million
    against the 2013 cap. If he is traded prior to June 1 he will count $13
    million against the 2013 cap.

    It gets worse. Suppose he is traded for a single #1 pick. That pick will
    cost an additional $2 million or so against the cap, bringing the total
    cap hit to $6 million, and in effect meaning Revis will cost us $15
    million in 2013 cap space. If we got more high picks, the effect would
    of course be even worse.

    Compare that to simply waiting until after June 1. Then all prorated cap
    money would be counted against the 2014 cap. Bottom line: $9 million in
    prorated money would be accelerated into the 2014 cap, not the 2013
    cap. Revis would then count only $4 million against the cap, and the
    picks would be 2014 picks, counting zero against the 2013 cap. Net
    result: simply waiting until after June 1 to trade him will save the
    Jets a whopping $11 million or more (depending on the return package of
    picks) in 2013 cap space.

    The Jets may be hell bent to trade Revis as soon as possible and take
    the entire cap hit in 2013. If so it pretty much signals that Idzik is
    writing off the 2013 season. I consider this highly unlikely, but not
    impossible. By simply waiting until after June 1 to trade Revis, if that
    is what the Jets wish to do, the Jets save at least $11 million in 2013
    cap space, at the cost of that cap hit taking place in 2014. Since the
    Jets are in far better shape cap wise in 2014, I consider it far more
    likely that if Revis is traded, he will be traded for 2014 picks.

    Myth #7: If Revis is lost to free agency, the Jets will get a 3rd round compensatory draft pick.

    Reality: The Jets will receive a 3rd round pick as compensation for
    Revis ONLY if the Jets do not sign any notable free agents in 2014.
    Compensation is intended to be for NET losses; i.e., weighing how much a
    team gained by signing FAs vs. how much they lost by other teams'
    signing their FAs. Since as it now stands the Jets will have
    considerable cap space in 2014, the likelihood of the Jets failing to
    sign any notable free agents is pretty low. If they do sign high end
    free agents of their own, then the compensation for Revis will be
    reduced accordingly. If the Jets sign enough FAs in 2014, then they may
    get no compensation at all for Revis.

    Myth #8: The Jets cannot cut Player X because it would leave them with too much dead money.

    Reality: Teams don't like dead money. It's money that counts against the
    cap being spent on players no longer with the team. In an ideal world
    you would never have any dead money. But the reality is dead money is
    already spent, and will count against the cap whether or not Player X is
    cut. So the only real issue is, does cutting Player X help the team? If
    it does, Player X can be cut, regardless of dead money. I can think of
    at least 2 scenarios where this is the case. The first: cutting Player X
    frees up enough cap space to make the dead money worthwhile. So, for
    example, if Player X is no longer good enough to play, and cutting him
    will result in $4 million in dead money but $7 million in cap savings,
    Player X should be cut, dead money or no dead money. The second scenario
    is where having a player on the team would result in a fractured locker
    room, or the player is a terrible influence on the team or undermines
    the coaches' authority. Then you have to get rid of him, dead money or
    no.

    Dead money is always a consideration, and too much dead money cripples
    your cap situation, but there is always the possibility that cutting a
    player and eating the dead money is in the best interests of the team.

    Myth #9: The Jets talk too much.

    Reality: This may be the most pervasive and pernicious myth of all Jets
    myths. The truth is, Tone talks some. Cro talks some. Scott talks some.
    But none of them are over the top. And.. and... who else? The Jets don't
    talk any more than almost any other team. Richard Sherman does more
    talking than all the Jets players combined, and I don't hear anything
    about how the Seahawks talk too much.

    There is one reason and only one reason this myth got started: Rex Ryan.
    Rex in the early days did nothing but run his mouth. However, even Rex
    doesn't really talk much these days, other than to compliment other
    teams. The notion that the Jets talk too much is a tired and outdated
    caricature that should be put to rest permanently.

    I hope I have set some things straight here. But what about you? What Jets myths would you like to see put to rest?

    > i saw this on " another fan site " .

  2. #2
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    options...

    The Darrelle Revis saga plays on this week with the
    Daily News reporting that the Jets were "actively shopping" the
    cornerback during the Scouting Combine in Indianapolis.

    That comes on the heels of another report that no one from the team met with Revis' representatives during the meat market, which is odd since every team seems to meet with every
    agent at a pre-free agency tampering convention disguised as a chance
    for scouts to watch players that they've been scouting for months or
    years run in a straight line. What's more, Rex Ryan has reportedly been
    left out of the process, leaving new G.M. John Idzik and owner Woody
    Johnson running the show.


    Naturally, this has been taken to

    mean that the Jets are hellbent on trading Revis. Ryan's the only one
    willing to go on the record and say he wants Revis on the team, but the
    narrative is that the others are doing an end run to ditch Revis as soon
    as possible.

    Maybe so, but these things can take a

    lot of twists and turns before reaching their final conclusion. That's
    especially true in cases like this one, where there are five distinct
    options for how things could wind up for the Jets and Revis.

    Option 1 - Trade Revis before the draft:

    In a perfect world, this is the option that works best for the Jets
    since they would be able to get new faces in April that would help turn
    the page on the Revis era immediately. This isn't a perfect world,
    though.Revis hasn't been on a field since

    tearing his ACL, leaving teams to guess about his health and leaving the
    Jets to have to consider taking 75 cents on the dollar in a deal
    because they can't sell Revis' future by solely focusing on the past.
    Beyond that, this is a draft that's shaping up to be a fairly
    underpowered one so adding extra picks wouldn't necessarily do much to
    kickstart the rebuild in green.


    Option 2 - Trade Revis this summer:

    This option gives Revis time to get healthy and restore at least some
    of his trade value, although any return in a deal would not be realized
    until the 2014 draft. That's not a bad thing if it brings back more
    value, although it would send an early white flag on the season.


    Option 3 - Trade Revis during the 2013 season:

    Similar to the second option, although with the increased benefit of
    time on the field to sell himself to other suitors as well as the
    possibility that injury/ineffectiveness somewhere else would lead
    someone to pay even more than the sticker price to grab Revis for their
    secondary. Going this option runs the risk that Revis is a disgruntled
    figure on the team as well as the risk of another injury that could
    destroy any trade value whatsoever.


    Option 4 - Re-sign Revis:

    The Jets aren't showing much interest in this course of action, which
    makes sense given his injury and their dismal salary cap outlook. Not
    even paying lip service to the idea of Revis remaining with the team is a
    bit strange, and it suggests that we were probably heading for this
    kind of situation even if Revis hadn't gone down in a heap against
    Miami.If Revis is back to being Revis,

    this is the best option because you don't win in the NFL by showing
    great players the door. If this is off the table, though, the Jets might
    as well make the trade whenever they get an offer that is even close
    because the final option isn't an option at all.


    Option 5 - Let Revis walk as a free agent without any compensation:

    This might not prove to be an option so much as a last resort, but it's
    where this will head if the Jets aren't able to pull either of the
    other triggers available to them. If it gets to this point, they'll
    deserve every bit of mockery they will surely receive.

    Josh Alper is also a writer for Pro Football Talk. You can follow him on Twitter.

    > http://www.nbcnewyor...-193565591.html

  3. #3
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    Great post....as for me...the "myths" just do nto bother me....the idiocy with the media reporting every time a Jets player farts got old long ago for me....I tend to only focus on strictly football....I do not get caught up with the non stop badmouthing of the Jets....as well as many so called Jets fans on this board who seems to get off on making fun of a team they say they are fans of. I have been a Jets fan since 1975....my current outlook is of optimism with the New GM...OC....west coast offense and trimming some of the fat (players let go) and the upcoming draft. Yes the Jets have not won a suprbowl since 1968, but they are far from being the worst orginization in football. I look at some post on the site and you would think the Jets have been hideous for the last 40 years. I am just a die hard football fan who get upset with the losses and enjoys the wins...I am also rational.



    Quote Originally Posted by kelly View Post
    There seems to be a certain amount of confusion regarding the Darrelle
    Revis situation, the Jets' cap situation, restructuring contracts, and
    various and sundry other messy details. I'm going to attempt to address
    many of the most common misconceptions being spread by the media and
    others and shed some light on what is really going on. Read on if you
    can stand exploring some of the arcane details necessary for a better
    understanding of these issues.

    Myth #1: The Jets cannot restructure Mark Sanchez' contract (or fill in
    the blank with your favorite outsize contract) because he would be a
    fool to accept less money.

    Reality: Restructuring contracts more often than not does not involve
    the player accepting less money. It CAN, and sometimes does, but more
    often restructuring a contract leaves the total guaranteed $ in place.
    What happens is base salary (which is always fully applied to the
    current year salary cap) is converted into signing bonus (which can be
    spread out in equal annual amounts over up to 5 years). So, as an
    example, if player X has a 2013 contract with a base salary of $12
    million, all guaranteed, all of that $12 million would count against the
    2013 cap. But if we converted $10 million of it into a signing bonus,
    the cap hit for that $10 million would be spread out over 5 years,
    making the cap hit as follows: 2013 $4 million ($2 million in remaining
    base salary plus $2 million prorated signing bonus). 2014-2017 $2
    million each year in prorated signing bonus. Thus player X still gets
    all his guaranteed money, but the cap hit for 2013 is reduced from $12
    million to $4 million. If you really want to get creative, you can even
    delay payment of the signing bonus until 2014 (or later), further
    reducing the 2013 cap hit to just $2 million, at the cost of further
    extending the cap hit into later years.

    The point here is Sanchez (or anyone else) does not have to be a fool to
    restructure his contract and provide the Jets cap relief. Restructuring
    contracts need not cost the player a cent. Whether or not it is
    advisable for the Jets to push out the cap hits into later years is an
    entirely different issue. It may well be the Jets would be fools for
    restructuring certain contracts -- the players, however, should not have
    a problem with it. That brings us to...

    Myth #2: Santonio Holmes (or David Harris, or choose your favorite
    outsized contract) is untradable because his contract is so large no
    team would want to take it on.

    Reality: No player who still is capable of playing in the NFL is
    completely untradable. As we discussed above, any player can have his
    contract restructured. The acquiring team in a trade picks up base
    salary and any currently unearned roster, workout and reporting bonuses.
    All prorated signing bonuses stay with the team trading the player, and
    are immediately accelerated into the current cap year.

    Trading any player with any value as a player (i.e., maybe not Tebow, or
    Sanchez) is not impossible. You simply have to get the cap figure for
    the acquiring team down enough to make the player attractive at that cap
    figure. The way to do that is to convert base salary into signing
    bonus. So, as an example, Santonio Holmes has a 2013 cap figure of
    $12,500,000, with $11 million in base salary. Any team acquiring that
    contract would be taking on $11 million in cap space, too much for a
    player like Holmes. But convert say $8,000,000 of his base salary into a
    signing bonus, and the cap hit for the acquiring team becomes a very
    manageable $3 million. Just like that, an untradable player becomes
    eminently tradable.

    There are two caveats to this. First, doing a deal like this creates
    dead money. In the Holmes example, we now have $8 million on the cap
    which is going to a player no longer on the team -- dead money. It is
    not ideal, and you can only do so much of this kind of thing before half
    the cap is being spent on other teams' players, but in small doses for
    the right trades it works. The other caveat is that you have to convince
    the player to restructure. As a monetary matter this shouldn't be
    difficult, as the restructuring preserves all of the player's money and
    in fact gets it to him faster. However, the player in effect has a no
    trade clause, in that if he hates the idea of playing for the new team,
    he has only to refuse to restructure. In that case you either have to
    find a more palatable team to trade with or sweeten the pot for the
    player. In most cases it should be doable, if the Jets are highly
    motivated to get the deal done, but the player can and occasionally does
    throw up a roadblock to a trade.

    Myth #3: The Jets are in salary cap hell in 2013 and simply have no way
    of affording anything other than bargain basement players.

    Reality: The Jets can afford to be major players in the free agent
    market, if they are so inclined. The Jets right now are already under
    the cap by enough to afford their draft class and sign one pretty good
    free agent. If the Jets want to go all in for 2013, they have
    significant room under current contracts to restructure and create ample
    space under the cap. Sanchez, Harris, Holmes, Cromartie, Ferguson,
    Mangold collectively represent as much as $40 million in base salary,
    roster bonuses, workout bonuses and reporting bonuses that can be
    restructured into signing bonuses that are prorated, moving as much as
    $32 million into later years' cap. This may or may not be something the
    Jets should do, and it may or may not be something Idzik decides to do,
    but it is most definitely something the Jets CAN do. If the Jets only
    sign bargain basement players in 2013, it should be understood that this
    was a CHOICE the Jets made after considering what was in the best
    interests of the organization, not something forced on them by an
    impossible cap situation.

    Myth #4: The Jets cannot afford to re-sign Revis under the 2013 cap.

    Reality: Revis is signed through the end of 2013. Any extension will rip
    up the voidable years of his contract (2014-2016) and replace them with
    something much larger in $. But it will only effect the 2013 cap figure
    if the Jets choose to structure it this way. If the Jets choose it is
    not at all difficult to restructure in such a way that 2013 remains
    untouched. It is even possible, though unlikely, to restructure in a way
    that LOWERS the 2013 cap figure (for example, by converting some of his
    $6 million in base salary and non-proratable bonus money in 2013 into a
    signing bonus, and prorating this into future years). Affording Revis
    will not be easy, but the current cap situation should not pose any
    impediment to getting it done. And 2014 cap room is more than ample to
    fit Revis in. The Jets can afford Revis. The question is, do they want
    to?

    Myth #5: Sanchez's contract impacts the Jets' ability to fit Revis under the cap.

    Reality: Sanchez's contract is structured in such a way that all his
    guaranteed money will be paid out by the end of the 2013 season. By 2014
    the Jets can afford to cut Sanchez. Since Sanchez only has an outsize
    effect on the Jets cap in 2013, and a new Revis contract would only
    effect the Jets cap space in 2014 and beyond, the two are completely
    unrelated issues. So long as the Jets don't move most of Sanchez's cap $
    into 2014, Sanchez's contract will have no effect on the Jets' ability
    to fit Revis under the cap.



    Myth #6: If Revis is traded he will bring back a package of 2013 draft picks.

    Reality: It's possible but not probable.

    Revis is unlikely to be traded before the 2013 draft. Hereís why.

    First, he will not even be running until early April at the earliest.
    Thatís straight line running, no cuts. No doctor in the world can at
    that stage of the recovery accurately predict how the knee will hold up
    in game conditions, hence no meaningful medical approval is possible.
    All they can say is he is progressing reasonably well so far. Teams will
    want to see him actually play cornerback. AP is NOT a template.
    Peterson's recovery was such an outlier in terms of how quickly he came
    back it was pretty much a medical miracle. This is the gold standard of
    recoveries -- it is silly to think all future recoveries will follow the
    same miraculous course. Revis is already 2 1/2 months behind AP. Plus a
    significant % of guys NEVER return to their former form.

    Putting aside the health issues, which I think almost everyone is WAY
    too confident about, there is an even more fundamental reason Revis will
    not be traded for 2013 picks: his contract. If Revis is traded PRIOR to
    June 1st, all cap ramifications flow into the 2013 cap. Those
    ramifications are as follows: a net $4 million INCREASE to the Jets cap
    #, even after accounting for the trading partner picking up his base
    salary and roster bonus, due to the prorated bonus money which will be
    immediately accelerated. Bottom line, as of now Revis counts $9 million
    against the 2013 cap. If he is traded prior to June 1 he will count $13
    million against the 2013 cap.

    It gets worse. Suppose he is traded for a single #1 pick. That pick will
    cost an additional $2 million or so against the cap, bringing the total
    cap hit to $6 million, and in effect meaning Revis will cost us $15
    million in 2013 cap space. If we got more high picks, the effect would
    of course be even worse.

    Compare that to simply waiting until after June 1. Then all prorated cap
    money would be counted against the 2014 cap. Bottom line: $9 million in
    prorated money would be accelerated into the 2014 cap, not the 2013
    cap. Revis would then count only $4 million against the cap, and the
    picks would be 2014 picks, counting zero against the 2013 cap. Net
    result: simply waiting until after June 1 to trade him will save the
    Jets a whopping $11 million or more (depending on the return package of
    picks) in 2013 cap space.

    The Jets may be hell bent to trade Revis as soon as possible and take
    the entire cap hit in 2013. If so it pretty much signals that Idzik is
    writing off the 2013 season. I consider this highly unlikely, but not
    impossible. By simply waiting until after June 1 to trade Revis, if that
    is what the Jets wish to do, the Jets save at least $11 million in 2013
    cap space, at the cost of that cap hit taking place in 2014. Since the
    Jets are in far better shape cap wise in 2014, I consider it far more
    likely that if Revis is traded, he will be traded for 2014 picks.

    Myth #7: If Revis is lost to free agency, the Jets will get a 3rd round compensatory draft pick.

    Reality: The Jets will receive a 3rd round pick as compensation for
    Revis ONLY if the Jets do not sign any notable free agents in 2014.
    Compensation is intended to be for NET losses; i.e., weighing how much a
    team gained by signing FAs vs. how much they lost by other teams'
    signing their FAs. Since as it now stands the Jets will have
    considerable cap space in 2014, the likelihood of the Jets failing to
    sign any notable free agents is pretty low. If they do sign high end
    free agents of their own, then the compensation for Revis will be
    reduced accordingly. If the Jets sign enough FAs in 2014, then they may
    get no compensation at all for Revis.

    Myth #8: The Jets cannot cut Player X because it would leave them with too much dead money.

    Reality: Teams don't like dead money. It's money that counts against the
    cap being spent on players no longer with the team. In an ideal world
    you would never have any dead money. But the reality is dead money is
    already spent, and will count against the cap whether or not Player X is
    cut. So the only real issue is, does cutting Player X help the team? If
    it does, Player X can be cut, regardless of dead money. I can think of
    at least 2 scenarios where this is the case. The first: cutting Player X
    frees up enough cap space to make the dead money worthwhile. So, for
    example, if Player X is no longer good enough to play, and cutting him
    will result in $4 million in dead money but $7 million in cap savings,
    Player X should be cut, dead money or no dead money. The second scenario
    is where having a player on the team would result in a fractured locker
    room, or the player is a terrible influence on the team or undermines
    the coaches' authority. Then you have to get rid of him, dead money or
    no.

    Dead money is always a consideration, and too much dead money cripples
    your cap situation, but there is always the possibility that cutting a
    player and eating the dead money is in the best interests of the team.

    Myth #9: The Jets talk too much.

    Reality: This may be the most pervasive and pernicious myth of all Jets
    myths. The truth is, Tone talks some. Cro talks some. Scott talks some.
    But none of them are over the top. And.. and... who else? The Jets don't
    talk any more than almost any other team. Richard Sherman does more
    talking than all the Jets players combined, and I don't hear anything
    about how the Seahawks talk too much.

    There is one reason and only one reason this myth got started: Rex Ryan.
    Rex in the early days did nothing but run his mouth. However, even Rex
    doesn't really talk much these days, other than to compliment other
    teams. The notion that the Jets talk too much is a tired and outdated
    caricature that should be put to rest permanently.

    I hope I have set some things straight here. But what about you? What Jets myths would you like to see put to rest?

    > i saw this on " another fan site " .

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetsfreak View Post
    Great post....as for me...the "myths" just do nto bother me....the idiocy with the media reporting every time a Jets player farts got old long ago for me....I tend to only focus on strictly football....I do not get caught up with the non stop badmouthing of the Jets....as well as many so called Jets fans on this board who seems to get off on making fun of a team they say they are fans of. I have been a Jets fan since 1975....my current outlook is of optimism with the New GM...OC....west coast offense and trimming some of the fat (players let go) and the upcoming draft. Yes the Jets have not won a suprbowl since 1968, but they are far from being the worst orginization in football. I look at some post on the site and you would think the Jets have been hideous for the last 40 years. I am just a die hard football fan who get upset with the losses and enjoys the wins...I am also rational.
    i think rex will have thiis season to get things goin' in the right direction.
    if there is no improvement...rex will be gone.

  5. #5
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    You trade a player, all the amortized money comes do immediately. It is not treated as a june 1 cut.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by patman View Post
    You trade a player, all the amortized money comes do immediately. It is not treated as a june 1 cut.
    I'm pretty sure the June 1st cutoff does not really have any meaning anymore. Teams can choose spread dead money over two years as if its a post-june 1st cut. I'm not sure if it works the same for a trade, but it may very well.

  7. #7
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    Trying to balance the Jets' books

    'Tis the season for number crunching.

    The Jets, like many teams, have salary-cap concerns. They have
    roughly $6 million in cap space, which doesn't allow them to be serious
    players in free agency -- unless they create more room by cutting
    players and/or restructuring contracts.

    Here's a position-by-position breakdown of the cap totals, providing
    insight into how the Jets have invested in recent years -- and where
    they need to trim some fat. (Note: Totals don't include current free
    agents such as Dustin Keller, Mike DeVito, LaRon Landry, et al. Allow small margin of error.)

    OFFENSE

    Quarterback : $16.48 million. Roughly 14 percent of cap devoted to a position that needs an overhaul. Yeesh.

    Running back : $1.8 million. If the QB position is Peter Luger's Steakhouse, this is Burger King.

    Wide receiver : $16.86 million. Not much bang for the buck, based on 2012 performance.

    Tight end : $960,000. Konrad Reuland and Hayden Smith are the top guys under contract. Hence, the low number. They need Keller.

    Offensive line : $22.12 million. A pretty high number, considering only two starters are under contract.

    Offense total : $58.22 million



    DEFENSE

    Defensive line : $12.5 million. One of the few areas where the talent lines up with the cost. They're trying to re-sign DeVito.

    Linebacker : $20.6 million. We're counting $4.5 million in dead money from Bart Scott, Calvin Pace cuts.

    Secondary : $26.47 million. The total will increase by $3 million if they trade Darrelle Revis, if you can believe that. Landry will be a tough squeeze.

    Defense total : $59.57 million


    > http://espn.go.com/b...-the-jets-books

  8. #8
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    The biggest issue in my eyes is do the Jets tank next season like the Colts did to get Andrew Luck or do they do everything possible to improve the team and finish 7-9 again and miss out on a top QB? Is it possible the Jets like maybe Geno Smith and draft him if available at #9 ? I honestly think the Jets need to tank a season and I mean tank it - start all rookies and make all moves for 2014 and then draft their Franchise QB. If they dont get their franchise QB it will just be season after season of mediocracy. If they put together as good a team as they can for next season then they are gonna miss out on a potential franchise QB - not by much but a number 9 pick again misses their guy or can they pull a rabbit out the hat like Seattle did last season? What to do? What to do?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeJam Football View Post
    The biggest issue in my eyes is do the Jets tank next season like the Colts did to get Andrew Luck or do they do everything possible to improve the team and finish 7-9 again and miss out on a top QB? Is it possible the Jets like maybe Geno Smith and draft him if available at #9 ? I honestly think the Jets need to tank a season and I mean tank it - start all rookies and make all moves for 2014 and then draft their Franchise QB. If they dont get their franchise QB it will just be season after season of mediocracy. If they put together as good a team as they can for next season then they are gonna miss out on a potential franchise QB - not by much but a number 9 pick again misses their guy or can they pull a rabbit out the hat like Seattle did last season? What to do? What to do?
    I'm 60 percent on board with tanking suck for luck style.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dunnie View Post
    I'm 60 percent on board with tanking suck for luck style.
    if we do NOT get a qb & upgrade our roster..." tanking the season " will NOT be a choice....we're just gonna lose because we suck. Seriously

  11. #11
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    ...Revis and Belichick ? No way

    Looking at the Jets and the rest of the NFL :

    1. Cancel this Foxborough shuttle: Let's end this notion right now. If Darrelle Revis plays out his contract and becomes an unrestricted free agent, there's no way he'll end up in New England. Tom Brady is the big fish in Beantown, and he'll remain the Patriots' highest-paid player for as long as he's around. It would contradict the Patriot Way to pay another player more than Saint Tom, who, in case you missed it, took a hometown discount last week.Combining his three-year extension with his two existing years, Brady reportedly averages $14.5 million per year -- below what Revis is seeking. Bill Belichick might feign interest to drive up the price (and tweak the Jets), but he'll never undercut Brady by paying someone else more -- especially someone who once called him a "jerk."

    2. Diminishing return: If the Jets get to the point where they decide to trade Revis (which, in my opinion, is how this will end), they need to remember this: In 2007, they traded their second-round pick to switch places with the Panthers and move up 11 spots in the first round, picking him 14th overall. As an asset, Revis has appreciated over time, so the Jets shouldn't settle for anything less than their original investment -- first- and second-round picks.

    By the way, Revis was the second DB drafted that year. Can you name the first? Answer below.

    3. More Revis thoughts: Trading Revis in the offseason could cost the Jets a quality starter. How's that? Right now, he's counting $9 million on the cap. If he's dealt, his "dead" charge is $12 million. That extra $3 million could mean the difference between re-signing a free agent like Mike DeVito or letting him go. In other words, you lose more than a premier cornerback if you trade Revis.

    The counter argument: If you wait until the end of the preseason to trade him, the dead charge is $15 million because he will have received $3 million in bonuses by then -- $1 million roster, $1 million workout and $1 million reporting. The Jets would have to leave themselves enough cap flexibility to incur an additional $6 million beyond his current cap figure, and that won't be easy. Let's face it, it's a mess.

    4. Draft nuggets: The Jets have met with the top 10 quarterback prospects, according to senior personnel exec Terry Bradway. In an interview with the team website, he said the strength of the QB class will be in the second and third round, although he suspects a couple will wind up as first-rounders. Reading between the lines, this tells me the Jets don't have any quarterbacks with a first-round grade.

    Other insights from Bradway: The best values at safety and running back are Rounds 2 to 4. There are 12 to 14 wide receivers who can make significant contributions as rookies. Oregon pass rusher Dion Jordan (shoulder surgery), a player linked to the Jets at No. 9, might not be ready until early training camp.

    5. Crystal ball: Prediction on the early theme of free agency for the Jets -- exodus. I can easily see them losing mainstays such as DeVito, Dustin Keller, Brandon Moore and Shonn Greene, along with LaRon Landry. Even with the bump in the cap, they're still only about $8 million under. It'll take about $8 million for the draft and restricted-free agent tenders, so they're really operating with no room for spending. They have to make cuts (Tim Tebow) and restructure contracts (Santonio Holmes) to create room.

    6. Austin Power: The Jets are trying to decide whether to give RT Austin Howard the first-round tender ($2.86 million) or second-round tender ($2.02 million) as a restricted free agent. Something they should consider: The Ravens, Howard's first team, own the last pick in the second round and could be looking for a left tackle to replace free-agent LT Bryant McKinnie. Howard, almost 26, would be better than any draft pick at that spot, so it wouldn't be a shock if the Ravens explore an offer sheet.

    7. Out like Flynn: A lot of folks are saying the Jets should trade for Seahawks backup QB Matt Flynn, but he'd hardly be a sure thing. Dolphins coach Joe Philbin, formerly Flynn's coordinator in Green Bay, passed on him last offseason. Chiefs GM John Dorsey, formerly a Packers exec, also passed, as the Chiefs opted to trade for Alex Smith. It tells you something about a player when the people who know him best don't want him.

    8. No ordinary Joe: Ravens QB Joe Flacco landed a six-year, $120.6 million contract, the 13th $100 million deal in NFL history. Of the eight contracts no longer active, the biggest actual payout was Brett Favre, who got $54.6 million of a $100 million deal, according to ESPN Stats & Information. Moral of the story: There's a lot of funny money in the NFL.

    9. No ordinary Joe, Part II: Three weeks ago, I had lunch with Flacco's agent, Joe Linta, for a story on another client, Stony Brook RB Miguel Maysonet. Linta, describing his penchant for signing small-school players (Flacco came from Delaware), admitted it's a risky way to do business. "It's living on the edge, but I like taking the road less traveled," he said. After his Flacco commission, Linta will be driving that road in style.

    10. A poor Reid-option: Alex Smith fits Andy Reid's West Coast offense because of his short accuracy, but let's be real here: The Chiefs gave up too much in the trade, sending the 49ers a second-round pick (No. 34) this year and a conditional pick in 2014. Smith isn't that good, but it's a weak quarterback class. Plus, the Chiefs have a poor track record for drafting passers. The last 10 quarterbacks drafted by the Chiefs never won a game for the franchise, per ESPN Stats. Where have you gone, Len Dawson?

    Answer to the trivia question: LaRon Landry, drafted sixth overall by the Redskins.

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york/jet...lichick-no-way

  12. #12
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    Fabulous job Kelly, really. Thanks for the time and hard work you put into this, it was a great read.

    ASH

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ASH_1962 View Post
    Fabulous job Kelly, really. Thanks for the time and hard work you put into this, it was a great read.

    ASH
    you're welcome !





    go jets ! !

  14. #14
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    Jets GM : Docs say Revis' rehab 'ahead of schedule'

    Darrelle Revis is moving closer to getting back on the football field.

    Whether that's with the New York Jets next season remains to be seen.

    Jets general manager John Idzik said during a conference call with season ticket holders Monday that there is encouraging news from doctors on Revis' rehabilitation from a torn ligament in his left knee."By all accounts, by his doctor's accounts, he's doing very well," Idzik said. "By their estimation, he's ahead of schedule."

    But Idzik wouldn't address the cornerback's murky contract situation.

    "Darrelle is a very valued player on our team," he said. "Our focus is squarely on getting him healthy, getting him back to his level of play."Idzik and coach Rex Ryan answered about 20 questions during the 30-minute conference call. Several were about the status of Revis, who is recovering from knee surgery that sidelined him for most of last season and has been the subject of rampant trade rumors.Ryan denied those suggestions last month at the NFL combine in Indianapolis, and did so again Monday.

    "I will stand firm by saying there was no truth to that," Ryan said.Revis is entering the final year of his contract, but wants to be among the league's highest-paid defensive players. The Jets are balancing the desire to keep one of the franchise's best players and being financially smart. If they believe they won't be able to sign him next offseason, they would be more apt to try to get something _ presumably high draft picks _ for him in a deal rather than lose him for nothing.In an interview with Seattle fullback Michael Robinson for "The Real Robinson Report," posted on YouTube on Monday night, Revis said the trade rumors "definitely hit home."

    He was also asked specifically about the possibility of being traded to San Francisco, one of the teams rumored to be interested. "I would just be an addition to help them win that trophy," Revis said. "Would it be awesome? Yeah. My main goal as a player, and I think of all of us players in the NFL, is to hold that Lombardi Trophy up in the air and wear that ring."Idzik wouldn't reveal plans for Tim Tebow, and appeared to hint that the quarterback could be in the mix at the position this offseason. But, Tebow is still expected to be traded or released in the coming weeks after one disappointing season in which he spent most of his time on the sideline _ even as starter Mark Sanchez struggled and was later benched.

    "He's currently on our roster," Idzik said of Tebow. "What we're doing is we're trying to increase competition at that position and positions across the board, so we're going to let the competition play out. We're going to see who we're able to bring on board and let it play out this offseason and into training camp.

    "So I think that'll be healthy for all concerned, including Tim."The Jets have been in talks with veteran David Garrard, and plan to keep Sanchez, who is guaranteed $8.25 million this season. Greg McElroy and Matt Simms will also be in the competition, and New York could still sign another free agent or draft a young quarterback.But, it's unlikely Tebow will be on the roster once the Jets begin offseason workouts. The Jets, by mentioning Tebow, could also be trying to build a trade market for him since most believe New York will end up cutting him.

    In other topics:

    - Ryan was asked if the Jets might consider doing HBO's "Hard Knocks" again: "We don't anticipate this year."

    - After cutting veteran linebackers Bart Scott and Calvin Pace, safety Eric Smith and offensive tackle Jason Smith, Idzik was asked if the Jets would consider bringing any of them back. "I don't think we ever shut the door on anything, especially your own players," he said. Ryan did indicate that second-year linebacker Demario Davis would replace Scott as the starter at middle linebacker.

    - Idzik said the team has spoken to representatives for their potential unrestricted free agents, a list that includes safeties Yeremiah Bell and LaRon Landry, running back Shonn Greene, defensive lineman Mike DeVito and tight end Dustin Keller. Idzik added that the team would like to retain right tackle Austin Howard, scheduled to become a restricted free agent.

    - Ryan believes the Jets can still attract star players in free agency despite their struggles the last two seasons. "The New York Jets are a team many players want to play for _ if not all," he said

    > http://www.maysville-online.com/spor...ab135fcdb.html

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