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Thread: 180 School Days

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by copernicus View Post
    Lets me try and respond;

    180 School Days was a 2 part documentary of an inner city school in DC and all the issues it faces. Cut to the chase, in the end, the new school reform that our country is implementing spear headed by GW Bush's NCLB used junk data to fire and shut down a school of educators including the principal who were dedicated, kind, caring, and intelligent people.

    Teachers have been evaluated for ever by their superiors just like every job in America. Teachers can be fired for their actions, they just cant be fired unjustly. There is a due process system.

    The current evaluating system that the government wants to use is simply unfair. Using test scores from exams created by the same group that wants to rid themselves of salaries seems to be a conflict of interest. School is so much more than tests but now, its all that its become. My special ed class has cancelled all talent classes including music and phys ed to prepare for the state exam. Its too much when we all ready had testing in place with state standardized exams like regents and SATs.

    We aloud big business and government infiltrate our school system and it has had a detrimental affect on the next generation of workers.


    I really wish that more of you guys watched the documentary. Its more about hard working people across America in our school system who are being railroaded by government. If you get the chance, watch 180 school days on PBS. I think it sheds light on how ridiculous it was to allow people like Bush and Bloomberg have so much power when it comes to our children.
    I hope you are not an English teacher. Sheesh!

    I do agree with you about the NCLB demands of standardized testing for special needs children being ridiculous. However, I'm not sure they can cancel PE classes that are mandated as part of a syllabus or IEP. As a concerned teacher, you should fight against that on behalf of your kids.

  2. #42
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    Copernicus, I have a question for you regarding testing. As we all know you are against standardized testing in schools. How do you feel about SATs being one of the main qualifiers for college acceptance? Is that unfair as well?

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trades View Post
    Copernicus, I have a question for you regarding testing. As we all know you are against standardized testing in schools. How do you feel about SATs being one of the main qualifiers for college acceptance? Is that unfair as well?
    Great question Trades. Let me make this clear to all, I am not against standardized tests. I am against the amount of pre testing, post testing, test prepping and focus (time) is spent on it only to use it against teachers for budgetary reasons.

    When you and I went to school there was a regents at the end of the year and for those who qualified they would take it. Seems reasonable, schools could use scores to see where they could improve and no one was looking to shut down schools based on the scores and fire teachers. The SAT exam is fine as well.

    Presently, standardized tests are out of control. No way students from impoverished areas, ESL, and Special Education students (and there teachers) could possibly be held to the same standards as students who go home to a two parent household that speak English without special needs. There are just too many variables, even in the perfect setting. I live in a pretty good neighborhood and my daughter's friend lost her grandfather who lived with them, her aunt three weeks ago, and her great grandmother around Christmas. So much for a 14 year old, or anyone to eal with. How do you think she will do on the state exam next week? Think her teacher should be held accountable and possibly fired for her score this year?

    Here is an article that I think is fair and one that I agree with.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinio...755_story.html


    By Eugene Robinson, Published: April 1

    It is time to acknowledge that the fashionable theory of school reform — requiring that pay and job security for teachers, principals and administrators depend on their students’ standardized test scores — is at best a well-intentioned mistake, and at worst nothing but a racket.

    I mean that literally. Beverly Hall, the former superintendent of the Atlanta public schools, was indicted on racketeering charges Friday for an alleged cheating scheme that won her more than $500,000 in performance bonuses. Hall, who retired two years ago, is also accused of theft, conspiracy and making false statements. She has denied any wrongdoing.


    Also facing criminal charges are 34 teachers and principals who allegedly participated in the cheating, which involved simply erasing students’ wrong answers on test papers and filling in the correct answers.

    In 2009, the American Association of School Administrators named Hall “National Superintendent of the Year” for improvement in student achievement that seemed, in retrospect, much too good to be true. On Georgia’s standardized competency test, students in some of Atlanta’s troubled neighborhoods appeared to vault past their counterparts in the wealthy suburbs.

    For educators who worked for Hall, bonuses and promotions were based on test scores. “Principals and teachers were frequently told by Beverly Hall and her subordinates that excuses for not meeting targets would not be tolerated,” according to the indictment.

    But there was a sure-fire way to meet those targets: After a day of testing, teachers allegedly were told to gather the students’ test sheets and change the answers. Suddenly a failing school would become a model of education reform. The principal and teachers would get bonuses. Hall would get accolades, plus a much bigger bonus. And students — duped into thinking they had mastered material that they hadn’t even begun to grasp — would get the shaft.

    State education officials became suspicious. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution wrote probing stories. There seemed to be no way to legitimately explain the dramatic improvement in test scores at some schools in such a short time, or the statistically improbable number of wrong-to-right erasures on answer sheets. But there was no proof.

    Sonny Perdue was Georgia’s governor at the time, and in August 2010 he ordered a blue-ribbon investigation. Hall resigned shortly before the release of the investigators’ report, which alleged that 178 teachers and principals cheated over nearly a decade — and that Hall either knew or should have known. Those findings laid the foundation for Friday’s grand jury indictment.

    My Post colleague Valerie Strauss, a veteran education reporter and columnist, wrote Friday that while there have been “dozens” of alleged cheating episodes around the country, only Atlanta’s has been aggressively and thoroughly investigated. “We don’t really know” how extensive the problem is, Strauss wrote, but “what we do know is that these cheating scandals have been a result of test-obsessed school reform.”

    In the District of Columbia, for example, there are unanswered questions about an anomalous pattern of wrong-to-right erasures on answer sheets during the reign of famed schools reformer Michelle Rhee, who starred in the documentary “Waiting for ‘Superman’ ” and graced the cover of Time magazine.

    Our schools desperately need to be fixed. But creating a situation in which teachers are more likely than students to cheat cannot be the right path.

    Standardized achievement tests are a vital tool, but treating test scores the way a corporation might treat sales targets is wrong. Students are not widgets. I totally reject the idea that students from underprivileged neighborhoods cannot learn. Of course they can. But how does it help these students to have their performance on a one-size-fits-all standardized test determine their teachers’ compensation and job security? The clear incentive is for the teacher to focus on test scores rather than actual teaching.

    Not every school system will become so mired in an alleged pattern of wrongdoing that officials can be charged under a racketeering statute of the kind usually used to prosecute mobsters. But even absent cheating, the blind obsession with test scores implies that teachers are interchangeable implements of information transfer, rather than caring professionals who know their students as individuals. It reduces students to the leavings of a No. 2 pencil.

    School reform cannot be something that ostensibly smart, ostentatiously tough “superstar” superintendents do to a school system and the people who depend on it. Reform has to be something that is done with a community of teachers, students and parents — with honesty and, yes, a bit of old-fashioned humility.
    Last edited by copernicus; 04-02-2013 at 11:57 AM.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by copernicus View Post
    Great question Trades. Let me make this clear to all, I am not against standardized tests. I am against the amount of pre testing, post testing, test prepping and focus (time) is spent on it only to use it against teachers for budgetary reasons.

    When you and I went to school there was a regents at the end of the year and for those who qualified they would take it. Seems reasonable, schools could use scores to see where they could improve and no one was looking to shut down schools based on the scores and fire teachers. The SAT exam is fine as well.

    Presently, standardized tests are out of control. No way students from impoverished areas, ESL, and Special Education students (and there teachers) could possibly be held to the same standards as students who go home to a two parent household that speak English without special needs. There are just too many variables, even in the perfect setting. I live in a pretty good neighborhood and my daughter's friend lost her grandfather who lived with them, her aunt three weeks ago, and her great grandmother around Christmas. So much for a 14 year old, or anyone to eal with. How do you think she will do on the state exam next week? Think her teacher should be held accountable and possibly fired for her score this year?

    Here is an article that I think is fair and one that I agree with.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinio...755_story.html


    By Eugene Robinson, Published: April 1

    It is time to acknowledge that the fashionable theory of school reform — requiring that pay and job security for teachers, principals and administrators depend on their students’ standardized test scores — is at best a well-intentioned mistake, and at worst nothing but a racket.

    I mean that literally. Beverly Hall, the former superintendent of the Atlanta public schools, was indicted on racketeering charges Friday for an alleged cheating scheme that won her more than $500,000 in performance bonuses. Hall, who retired two years ago, is also accused of theft, conspiracy and making false statements. She has denied any wrongdoing.


    Also facing criminal charges are 34 teachers and principals who allegedly participated in the cheating, which involved simply erasing students’ wrong answers on test papers and filling in the correct answers.

    In 2009, the American Association of School Administrators named Hall “National Superintendent of the Year” for improvement in student achievement that seemed, in retrospect, much too good to be true. On Georgia’s standardized competency test, students in some of Atlanta’s troubled neighborhoods appeared to vault past their counterparts in the wealthy suburbs.

    For educators who worked for Hall, bonuses and promotions were based on test scores. “Principals and teachers were frequently told by Beverly Hall and her subordinates that excuses for not meeting targets would not be tolerated,” according to the indictment.

    But there was a sure-fire way to meet those targets: After a day of testing, teachers allegedly were told to gather the students’ test sheets and change the answers. Suddenly a failing school would become a model of education reform. The principal and teachers would get bonuses. Hall would get accolades, plus a much bigger bonus. And students — duped into thinking they had mastered material that they hadn’t even begun to grasp — would get the shaft.

    State education officials became suspicious. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution wrote probing stories. There seemed to be no way to legitimately explain the dramatic improvement in test scores at some schools in such a short time, or the statistically improbable number of wrong-to-right erasures on answer sheets. But there was no proof.

    Sonny Perdue was Georgia’s governor at the time, and in August 2010 he ordered a blue-ribbon investigation. Hall resigned shortly before the release of the investigators’ report, which alleged that 178 teachers and principals cheated over nearly a decade — and that Hall either knew or should have known. Those findings laid the foundation for Friday’s grand jury indictment.

    My Post colleague Valerie Strauss, a veteran education reporter and columnist, wrote Friday that while there have been “dozens” of alleged cheating episodes around the country, only Atlanta’s has been aggressively and thoroughly investigated. “We don’t really know” how extensive the problem is, Strauss wrote, but “what we do know is that these cheating scandals have been a result of test-obsessed school reform.”

    In the District of Columbia, for example, there are unanswered questions about an anomalous pattern of wrong-to-right erasures on answer sheets during the reign of famed schools reformer Michelle Rhee, who starred in the documentary “Waiting for ‘Superman’ ” and graced the cover of Time magazine.

    Our schools desperately need to be fixed. But creating a situation in which teachers are more likely than students to cheat cannot be the right path.

    Standardized achievement tests are a vital tool, but treating test scores the way a corporation might treat sales targets is wrong. Students are not widgets. I totally reject the idea that students from underprivileged neighborhoods cannot learn. Of course they can. But how does it help these students to have their performance on a one-size-fits-all standardized test determine their teachers’ compensation and job security? The clear incentive is for the teacher to focus on test scores rather than actual teaching.

    Not every school system will become so mired in an alleged pattern of wrongdoing that officials can be charged under a racketeering statute of the kind usually used to prosecute mobsters. But even absent cheating, the blind obsession with test scores implies that teachers are interchangeable implements of information transfer, rather than caring professionals who know their students as individuals. It reduces students to the leavings of a No. 2 pencil.

    School reform cannot be something that ostensibly smart, ostentatiously tough “superstar” superintendents do to a school system and the people who depend on it. Reform has to be something that is done with a community of teachers, students and parents — with honesty and, yes, a bit of old-fashioned humility.
    Thanks for your answer. I remember taking state tests when I was a kid in the 70s. I don't know when it all started. Kids that want better SAT scores take test prep classes and/or get books to study for them. That is how you improve on the tests. Part of the prep process is learning the subject. I don't see the issue.

    As for the article, using that example against merit pay is similar to blaming all teachers for pedophiles. While there are a few people willing to cheat like that for their own gain it doesn't make the whole system bad. Plus they got caught. Or are you saying all teachers and administrators are unscrupulous and don't care about the kids?

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trades View Post
    Thanks for your answer. I remember taking state tests when I was a kid in the 70s. I don't know when it all started. Kids that want better SAT scores take test prep classes and/or get books to study for them. That is how you improve on the tests. Part of the prep process is learning the subject. I don't see the issue.

    As for the article, using that example against merit pay is similar to blaming all teachers for pedophiles. While there are a few people willing to cheat like that for their own gain it doesn't make the whole system bad. Plus they got caught. Or are you saying all teachers and administrators are unscrupulous and don't care about the kids?
    Thanks Trades. Again, I have nothing against how the SATs and regents exams were administered pre No Child Left Behind/ Common Core Standards.

    Test prep in the past was something that was done mostly outside of school. I too remember my parents signing me up for SAT help classes on Saturday mornings. These classes were privately run and had no connection to the companies that actually designed the test. Presently, test prep is about 90% or more of the focus inside of school. It is done in obvious and sometimes not so obvious ways. One of my classes is specifically for special ed students. About a month ago they implemented a new class into their schedule. Its called homework help but it is really a test prep class where the teacher is forced to give test prep materials from a specific company for children to work from. To implement this class, my special ed students no longer take their art class. Test prep materials are sent by the same company that creates standardized test. You would think that having the same company that creates the actual exam and the same company that provides the test prep materials would be a good thing. Think again. The irony is that the test prep materials often do not match up to what is given on the test itself! Many believe that this is done purposely. Think about it, students are not prepared for the exam, scores are low forcing parents to seek outside help. This outside help (Bose, Silvian Learning Center, etc) are often linked to testing companies! And as an added bonus, the teachers look more incompetent adding to why they shouldn't have job security and deserved to be fired.

    The Atlanta School Standardized Tests scandal is exactly what merit pay and the threats of school closures based on unreachable goals will continue to lead to.

    In regards to standardized testing, NYC PS teachers are removed from the classroom for THREE weeks to mark the state exams. Their students are left with a substitute teacher for 15 straight school days disrupting education and costing tax payers more money. Few years ago, lets just say a close teacher friend of mine was asked to mark the state exam. What he told me about the experience was disturbing to say the least. Because Mayor Bloomberg needed reassurance publicly that his educational reforms were raising scores, teachers who scored students that were deserving low were taken into a separate room from the rest of the teachers and questioned in a threatening way and all but forced to change and raise students scores.

    In my professional opinion, with so much money at stake, and the threat of closing schools unjustly, I believe it is happening in most school districts on some level.

    Interesting how the article mentioned Michelle Rhee. How unbelievably hypocritical that she was successful firing many competant educators using junk data from standardized test scores, the same standardized tests scores that she is accused of changing to enhance her own career.

    The present state of standardized tests have created a very angry atmosphere between administrator to teacher, teacher to teacher, and student to teacher. The only ones benefiting from the current standardized testing system are the testing companies that are often connected to the politicians in a monetary way.

    Again, I have no problem with the standardized testing system prior to No Child Left Behind and now Common Core Standards. Before NCLB/CCS there was a whole lot more integrity. Teachers and administrators worked together to help all students. Then politicians vilified all educators and you are witnessing the end result. Very sad state are schools are in because of the over the top focuss and spending on city, state, and national standardized exams.
    Last edited by copernicus; 04-02-2013 at 11:02 PM.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by copernicus View Post
    Thanks Trades. Again, I have nothing against how the SATs and regents exams were administered pre No Child Left Behind/ Common Core Standards.

    Test prep in the past was something that was done mostly outside of school. I too remember my parents signing me up for SAT help classes on Saturday mornings. These classes were privately run and had no connection to the companies that actually designed the test. Presently, test prep is about 90% or more of the focus inside of school. It is done in obvious and sometimes not so obvious ways. One of my classes is specifically for special ed students. About a month ago they implemented a new class into their schedule. Its called homework help but it is really a test prep class where the teacher is forced to give test prep materials from a specific company for children to work from. To implement this class, my special ed students no longer take their art class. Test prep materials are sent by the same company that creates standardized test. You would think that having the same company that creates the actual exam and the same company that provides the test prep materials would be a good thing. Think again. The irony is that the test prep materials often do not match up to what is given on the test itself! Many believe that this is done purposely. Think about it, students are not prepared for the exam, scores are low forcing parents to seek outside help. This outside help (Bose, Silvian Learning Center, etc) are often linked to testing companies! And as an added bonus, the teachers look more incompetent adding to why they shouldn't have job security and deserved to be fired.

    The Atlanta School Standardized Tests scandal is exactly what merit pay and the threats of school closures based on unreachable goals will continue to lead to.

    In regards to standardized testing, NYC PS teachers are removed from the classroom for THREE weeks to mark the state exams. Their students are left with a substitute teacher for 15 straight school days disrupting education and costing tax payers more money. Few years ago, lets just say a close teacher friend of mine was asked to mark the state exam. What he told me about the experience was disturbing to say the least. Because Mayor Bloomberg needed reassurance publicly that his educational reforms were raising scores, teachers who scored students that were deserving low were taken into a separate room from the rest of the teachers and questioned in a threatening way and all but forced to change and raise students scores.

    In my professional opinion, with so much money at stake, and the threat of closing schools unjustly, I believe it is happening in most school districts on some level.

    Interesting how the article mentioned Michelle Rhee. How unbelievably hypocritical that she was successful firing many competant educators using junk data from standardized test scores, the same standardized tests scores that she is accused of changing to enhance her own career.

    The present state of standardized tests have created a very angry atmosphere between administrator to teacher, teacher to teacher, and student to teacher. The only ones benefiting from the current standardized testing system are the testing companies that are often connected to the politicians in a monetary way.

    Again, I have no problem with the standardized testing system prior to No Child Left Behind and now Common Core Standards. Before NCLB/CCS there was a whole lot more integrity. Teachers and administrators worked together to help all students. Then politicians vilified all educators and you are witnessing the end result. Very sad state are schools are in because of the over the top focuss and spending on city, state, and national standardized exams.
    That Bloomberg is a crafty one! He is forcing low test scores to fire teaches and at the same time forcing "falsely" higher test scores at the same time to prove out his policies. Brilliant!

    I see what you are saying on the whole but as I have said before I think you need to get out of the city and teach in a real school instead of a prison. The rest of the country is nothing like what you describe. You chose your situation and continue to stay there. Before you say you stay there for the kids you have also said that the kids and their parents don't give a damn so why not go somewhere where the parents are involved, administration isn't draconian and kids aren't carrying weapons?

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trades View Post
    That Bloomberg is a crafty one! He is forcing low test scores to fire teaches and at the same time forcing "falsely" higher test scores at the same time to prove out his policies. Brilliant!

    I see what you are saying on the whole but as I have said before I think you need to get out of the city and teach in a real school instead of a prison. The rest of the country is nothing like what you describe. You chose your situation and continue to stay there. Before you say you stay there for the kids you have also said that the kids and their parents don't give a damn so why not go somewhere where the parents are involved, administration isn't draconian and kids aren't carrying weapons?
    Teaching jobs are easy to get now? Um no.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cr726 View Post
    Teaching jobs are easy to get now? Um no.
    Actually a recent study showed that recent college grads with a major in elementary school education had among the LOWEST rates of unemployment. There is DEMAND for teachers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by palmetto defender View Post
    Actually a recent study showed that recent college grads with a major in elementary school education had among the LOWEST rates of unemployment. There is DEMAND for teachers.
    Here in Charlotte teachers are in demand although that is changing ...why? they pay them under 35K to start and after a few years they get up to 45/50K.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by palmetto defender View Post
    Actually a recent study showed that recent college grads with a major in elementary school education had among the LOWEST rates of unemployment. There is DEMAND for teachers.
    Elementary is 1/3 of the teaching gigs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cr726 View Post
    Elementary is 1/3 of the teaching gigs.
    So. It's an opportunity. Especially for women.
    And there will really be a chance and more openings when they get through indicting all the phony teachers faking up test scores. 35 and counting in Atlanta. Funny, the head came from Brooklyn. I guess the NYC ethics and morality rubbed off very well on her. Randi Weingarten blames the system. They had to cheat to keep up.
    This is a wide spread cancer. It happened in Charleston 2 years ago. Also Dallas, LA, Phily, DC.
    Odd - all mostly minority districts. And all showing remarkable progress.
    Cheat the kids. That's the way to a fine future.

  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by palmetto defender View Post
    So. It's an opportunity. Especially for women.
    And there will really be a chance and more openings when they get through indicting all the phony teachers faking up test scores. 35 and counting in Atlanta. Funny, the head came from Brooklyn. I guess the NYC ethics and morality rubbed off very well on her. Randi Weingarten blames the system. They had to cheat to keep up.
    This is a wide spread cancer. It happened in Charleston 2 years ago. Also Dallas, LA, Phily, DC.
    Odd - all mostly minority districts. And all showing remarkable progress.
    Cheat the kids. That's the way to a fine future.
    The bigger the school district the bigger problems that come with it. Harvard just had a scandal too, sorry to disrupt your racist theory.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cr726 View Post
    The bigger the school district the bigger problems that come with it. Harvard just had a scandal too, sorry to disrupt your racist theory.
    Facts are facts. Demographics are what they are. The fact is that teachers and administrotors involved in these cheating activities are mostly black. In Charleston (not a huge district) it was 100%. And the students at those particular schools were 90%+ black.
    The Harvard cheating involved students not professors and was uncovered by a prof. Big difference. College students cheating is hardly new. Teachers cheating in elementary schools to get bigger bonuses is.

    I've made the point before. Black kids are being screwed by liberals (white and black) who could care less. They want a bonus.

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    Quote Originally Posted by palmetto defender View Post
    Facts are facts. Demographics are what they are. The fact is that teachers and administrotors involved in these cheating activities are mostly black. In Charleston (not a huge district) it was 100%. And the students at those particular schools were 90%+ black.
    The Harvard cheating involved students not professors and was uncovered by a prof. Big difference. College students cheating is hardly new. Teachers cheating in elementary schools to get bigger bonuses is.

    I've made the point before. Black kids are being screwed by liberals (white and black) who could care less. They want a bonus.
    Now liberal teachers are money hungry and non-caring? Wow, I guess you can use the word liberal to mean what you want any ol time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by palmetto defender View Post
    Actually a recent study showed that recent college grads with a major in elementary school education had among the LOWEST rates of unemployment. There is DEMAND for teachers.
    Id like to see a link to that study. In NY, elementary schools are cutting teachers, not adding new ones, in a lot of districts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brooklyn Jet View Post
    Id like to see a link to that study. In NY, elementary schools are cutting teachers, not adding new ones, in a lot of districts.
    Public sector jobs have been on a steady decline, Palmetto was probably shining his anchor when that report came out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cr726 View Post
    Teaching jobs are easy to get now? Um no.
    Are you saying that Coper can only get a job if it is easy? That isn't nice.

    Seriously though since when is it only good or possible if it is easy? I have found that the best things in life are not easy to get.

    e.g. Ramen noodles are easy to get, Filet Mignon? Not as easy.
    Fat 40 year old women are easy to get, models? Not as easy.
    Rusted out 1970's K Carts are easy to get, Porches? Not as easy.
    Bad, poorly paying jobs are easy to get, Good high paying jobs? Not as easy.

    See the trend?

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    Quote Originally Posted by cr726 View Post
    Public sector jobs have been on a steady decline, Palmetto was probably shining his anchor when that report came out.
    I just know from personal relationships - my wife, friends, etc. who are teachers and administrators - that many local hudson valley area elementary schools are laying off teachers every year, enrollment is down, and the market is flooded with teachers looking for jobs that cant even be offered jobs unless those ahead of them in seniority are taken care of first.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trades View Post
    Are you saying that Coper can only get a job if it is easy? That isn't nice.

    Seriously though since when is it only good or possible if it is easy? I have found that the best things in life are not easy to get.

    e.g. Ramen noodles are easy to get, Filet Mignon? Not as easy.
    Fat 40 year old women are easy to get, models? Not as easy.
    Rusted out 1970's K Carts are easy to get, Porches? Not as easy.
    Bad, poorly paying jobs are easy to get, Good high paying jobs? Not as easy.

    See the trend?
    I agree 100%. I would also add theres not easy, and then theres virtually impossible. Id advise a New York area college kid, unless they want to relocate to another state down south, not major in Education unless they want to flip burgers for a few years first, or work in day care. The jobs just dont seem to be there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GandWFan View Post
    Test papers, essays, and daily lesson plans can easily happen during the school day. You are NOT in the classroom from 8am until 3:20. There are free periods designed for just that sort of work. And if you have taught the same class before, you can re-use lesson plans and test from previous years. The material does not change that much.

    Workshops and higher education are part of all knowledge workers jobs. The only difference is that non-teachers have to study real subjects, not basket weaving and bubble gum chewing, just to accumulate credits for their automatic raises.

    And you are correct. 8am to 3:20pm is 7 and2/3rds hrs per day. Of course, that includes lunch and all free periods. I could be wrong, but I think that city HS and JHS teachers actually teach in front of students 4 periods a day. That would be approximately 3 hrs per day of actual teaching.

    But let's go with your number. Still just over 38 hrs a week, for 36 weeks a year. That would be almost 1380 hrs per year.

    Most knowledge workers these days are working 10 hr days, but again, lets use the 9 - 5 8 hr day for comparison. Of the 52 weeks, most people have 10 holidays, so we are down to 50 weeks. Most people start at 2 weeks vacation, but let's throw in an extra week for an average worker, so we are down to 47 weeks. 47 weeks times 40 hours per week = 1880 hrs per year.

    The difference is a little over 500 hrs, or 12.5 weeks, per year. As a percentage, teachers work approximately 26% less than a 9-5 job. Which, btw, don't exist. 9-5 jobs in the private sector have gone the way of the dinosaur.

    Of course this 73% part time job has other perks as well. YOU CAN"T GET FIRED. No pressure. Even if you molest a child, they only move you out of the classroom SO YOU DON"T HAVE TO TEACH AT ALL!

    So please stop crying about your guaranteed part-time job. Those of us who work for a living and pay for your unions excessive demands take offense.
    This might be the most ignorant post of all time. Every single one of your bitter accusations is off base. "Free Periods" lol ok thanks......... I know teachers who spend saturday and sunday afternoons grading papers.

    An essay takes at least 5 minutes each to grade and critique times 125 students= 10+ hours a week. Thats just ONE assignment per week...imagine several even teaching different subjects meaning different preps. Then you have to do the data entry, plus meetings that prevent you from doing all that plus lesson planning plus prof development plus parent meetings plus all the other clerical stuff that is unavoidable

    dude seriously your post is very angry and baseless. you sound like a big time whiner probably pouring concrete and breaking your back wondering what it could have been like if you didnt make such bad decisions as a youngster.

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