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Thread: Autism - 1 in 50 Children

  1. #1
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    Autism - 1 in 50 Children

    That's the latest figure from the CDC, as per parent reporting of children's diagnostic classification. No reason to believe it isn't mostly accurate. Problem is, no one, and I mean no one in a real position to do anything, seems particularly concerned. They keep saying the same thing "better diagnosis, awareness, changing criteria". The criteria changed in the late 1980s, so unless they are saying the docs weren't paying attention to things for a few decades. . .I'm just dumbfounded by the lack of a sense of urgency.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fsb-AxCzjuY

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HqxiClwgSdw (the :30 ad is longer than the entire piece which is :21. WTF?)

    http://www.nbcnews.com/video/nightly...64959#51264959

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...92J0YX20130320

    http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/0...s-have-autism/

    http://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireSto...3#.UVTJ8Rysh8E

  2. #2
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    A very scary subject, and I am afraid I can't add much.

    I have a 5 month old grandson, so I do have worries, 1 in 50.

    For me I tend to worry about the things that affect my life on a personal level, Such as the physical health and mental health of my aging parents, my sisters rheumatoid arthritis, nephews diabetes, wife's colitis, and so on.

    Just saying I can understand why some might not make it a priority when there is a plethora of other ailments out there to compete with the lime light so to speak.

    Seems like Autism could use a good spokes person or a PR firm, I mean boobies get all kind of support, more so then they deserve in my mind, almost all men over the age of 20 have some degree of prostrate cancer yet no one does a walk for prostrate cancer.

  3. #3
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    That is a very scary stat. It is a shame that we can go to Mars and land on the moon but when it comes to the brain we know so little. But like you said, until the people that matter start caring, little will change. Just one of the many crimes we are committing against our children and future generations of children.

  4. #4
    I have 2 students with autism in one of my special education classes. They are both wonderful and extremely needy. I care for them so much, but there are days where they need much more help than I can provide. There are some days where they are fine and others where they are so far off task that they become unsafe to themselves and others in the classroom. Just to get them to put their name on the paper some days is a huge accomplishment. Other days they run around the classroom, yell uncontrollably and sometimes act in a ways that are violent.

    The school system does not help students autism by forcing them to take state exams just like regular ed kids. Most of the school day is spent preparing for the state exam. It stresses out the kids with autism and other special needs to no end where they get emotional and often begin to cry and swear. It is heartbreaking to say the least. My current special ed class has cancelled all talent and music classes until after the state exam. What do you think will help a kid with autism more, music or taking a standardized test?

    There are no specific strategies for teachers to help those with autism. Their parents are usually so thankful that anyone tries to help.

    Sadly, their will be less teachers willing to teach kids with autism and other special needs in the future as long as the government continues the push to evaluate teachers by using test scores of kids with autism against them.

    Stressing out a kid with autism by forcing them for most of the school year to practice and take the state exam should be considered child abuse.

    Only in the US
    Last edited by copernicus; 03-28-2013 at 09:58 PM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by copernicus View Post
    I have 2 students with autism in one of my special education classes. They are both wonderful and extremely needy. I care for them so much, but there are days where they need much more help than I can provide. There are some days where they are fine and others where they are so far off task that they become unsafe to themselves and others in the classroom. Just to get them to put their name on the paper some days is a huge accomplishment. Other days they run around the classroom, yell uncontrollably and sometimes act in a ways that are violent.

    The school system does not help students autism by forcing them to take state exams just like regular ed kids. Most of the school day is spent preparing for the state exam. It stresses out the kids with autism and other special needs to no end where they get emotional and often begin to cry and swear. It is heartbreaking to say the least. My current special ed class has cancelled all talent and music classes until after the state exam. What do you think will help a kid with autism more, music or taking a standardized test?

    There are no specific strategies for teachers to help those with autism. Their parents are usually so thankful that anyone tries to help.

    Sadly, their will be less teachers willing to teach kids with autism and other special needs in the future as long as the government continues the push to evaluate teachers by using test scores of kids with autism against them.

    Stressing out a kid with autism by forcing them for most of the school year to practice and take the state exam should be considered child abuse.

    Only in the US
    What's the old joke? Okay, enough about me. So how do you like my dress?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by long island leprechaun View Post
    What's the old joke? Okay, enough about me. So how do you like my dress?
    So this is your response?

    We have a serious epidemic in the country with autism and turn on the news and there is very little info on it.

    Schools, at one time, were set up to help children, not anymore.

    Schools could have been part of the process of finding a way to improve strategies for dealing with autism

    Schools now adds to the stress of children and families that deal with autism

  7. #7
    Remarks on the Floor of the NYS Assembly on budget amendment to restore state support for people with developmental disabilities. Unfortunately, Democrats like to talk the talk by signing letters of support for restoring this critical funding but didn’t walk the walk when it came to their votes as the amendment was defeated 44-95.

    The state budget cuts programs and services for people with developmental disabilities by $90 million yet maintains a $420 million tax credit for Hollywood movie studios and television networks to film movies and shows in the Empire State including a much-derided $5 million tax credit to NBC/Comcast for Jimmy Fallon to host the “Tonight Show” in New York City.

    The priority should be looking out for families and people with developmental disabilities, not giving taxpayer-funded handouts to the “Tonight Show” and support the lifestyles of the rich and famous in Beverly Hills.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=tG85lLILQr8


  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by long island leprechaun View Post
    What's the old joke? Okay, enough about me. So how do you like my dress?
    Haha... So true. It's the evil testing of students. OMG.

    Why would anyone care if special needs kids pass an exam? Seems like a misuse of resources to me. They are not going to Harvard anyway.

    But let's highlight the most extreme cases to push our agenda.

    Maybe we should push for testing the normal kids so they can graduate high school with at least a 4th grade reading level, and give special dispensation to the special needs kids.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by AlbanyJet View Post
    Remarks on the Floor of the NYS Assembly on budget amendment to restore state support for people with developmental disabilities. Unfortunately, Democrats like to talk the talk by signing letters of support for restoring this critical funding but didn’t walk the walk when it came to their votes as the amendment was defeated 44-95.

    The state budget cuts programs and services for people with developmental disabilities by $90 million yet maintains a $420 million tax credit for Hollywood movie studios and television networks to film movies and shows in the Empire State including a much-derided $5 million tax credit to NBC/Comcast for Jimmy Fallon to host the “Tonight Show” in New York City.

    The priority should be looking out for families and people with developmental disabilities, not giving taxpayer-funded handouts to the “Tonight Show” and support the lifestyles of the rich and famous in Beverly Hills.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=tG85lLILQr8

    Absolutely agree.

    We should help those who need it, not Hollywood.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by long island leprechaun View Post
    What's the old joke? Okay, enough about me. So how do you like my dress?
    LOL, great post.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by AlbanyJet View Post
    Remarks on the Floor of the NYS Assembly on budget amendment to restore state support for people with developmental disabilities. Unfortunately, Democrats like to talk the talk by signing letters of support for restoring this critical funding but didn’t walk the walk when it came to their votes as the amendment was defeated 44-95.

    The state budget cuts programs and services for people with developmental disabilities by $90 million yet maintains a $420 million tax credit for Hollywood movie studios and television networks to film movies and shows in the Empire State including a much-derided $5 million tax credit to NBC/Comcast for Jimmy Fallon to host the “Tonight Show” in New York City.

    The priority should be looking out for families and people with developmental disabilities, not giving taxpayer-funded handouts to the “Tonight Show” and support the lifestyles of the rich and famous in Beverly Hills.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=tG85lLILQr8

    Your outrage is misplaced here. The State uses tax credits to lure the studos in and promote bringing business to the city that wasn't there before. It is about increasing revenues so that we can afford the programs that you mentioned. I'm more troubled by things like a 20 Million expense to add sex change operations to the list of approved procedures for state employees on the State healthcare plan.
    Last edited by chiefst2000; 03-29-2013 at 10:49 AM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlbanyJet View Post
    Remarks on the Floor of the NYS Assembly on budget amendment to restore state support for people with developmental disabilities. Unfortunately, Democrats like to talk the talk by signing letters of support for restoring this critical funding but didn’t walk the walk when it came to their votes as the amendment was defeated 44-95.

    The state budget cuts programs and services for people with developmental disabilities by $90 million
    Was not aware of that as my children are both of school age. I know that Cuomo pushed through a part of the budget that cut the requirements of special needs students to the bare minimum required by the Feds. I'm not surprised that this was also done to the budget. First population to suffer cuts is always the disabled, then the elderly. Disposable populations as far as most are concerned.

    If this path continues to be traveled, the horrors of the past with regard to the treatment of these individuals will come back, most likely in spades given the numbers we're talking.

    Gunnails, I hear what you're saying and I suppose that you are right to a degree, people care about their problems. Thing is, this diagnosis outstrips pediatric AIDS, cancer and juvenile diabetes combined. Most of these kids will grow up to be autistic adults, many of whom will need varying degrees of support. And that is going to cost a lot of money. Or, it will just require big enough repositories to hide them away in.

    Funny how there aren't more of these adults around already seeing how all the experts say that there isn't really an increase. Even funnier that the CDC and AAP refuses to classify something that affects 2% of the child population as an epidemic or healthcare emergency. But trampolines, that's a problem (I'm not kidding, studies were done).

    Copernicus, there are plenty of educational strategies in place for autistic students. The problem is there are far fewer behavioral strategies in place. That is where there is a gross failing on the part of the school systems. If the educational bureaucracies are going to continue to accept Federal monies to support them, they should also be required to demonstrate an ability to provide a true FAPE as required by law, not just some syllabus or blanket IEP that looks good on paper. Maybe then these kids would receive the support they deserve and the DoE wouldn't get creamed on Carter cases.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by chiefst2000 View Post
    Your outrage is misplaced here. The State uses tax credits to lure the studos in and promote bringing business to the city that wasn't there before. It is about increasing revenues so that we can afford the programs that you mentioned. I'm more troubled by things like a 20 Million expense to add sex change operations to the list of approved procedures for state employees on the State healthcare plan.
    Right, this is off topic but a good point. You can't give businesses tax breaks to incentive a move to your state, then complain they are getting tax breaks.

    *sigh* well i guess you can, but it's damned annoying to read.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Jetworks View Post
    That's the latest figure from the CDC, as per parent reporting of children's diagnostic classification. No reason to believe it isn't mostly accurate. Problem is, no one, and I mean no one in a real position to do anything, seems particularly concerned. They keep saying the same thing "better diagnosis, awareness, changing criteria". The criteria changed in the late 1980s, so unless they are saying the docs weren't paying attention to things for a few decades. . .I'm just dumbfounded by the lack of a sense of urgency.
    I happen to think "better diagnosis, awareness, changing criteria" are pretty good points. Though i might leave off the "better". Slow adoption is found in the medical community just as everywhere else. It's not a matter of paying attention but understanding, and coming to terms with the new criteria.

    Understand that there is no objective test for autism. You can't do a blood test. It won't show up on an MRI. It's diagnosed by behavior only, which is why i scratch my head when i read "better diagnosis".

    Add to that the amount of money that is allocated to the treatment of Autism, of from a pharmaceutical standpoint, and the amount of money and resources allocated to government entities, and you'll begin to understand my skepticism that this is indeed an epidemic.

    I do believe there has been an increase in autism rates, i just believe that the data is so polluted that is difficult to quantify how much.

  15. #15
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    I think the autism diagnosis, along with ADHD, are severely abused today. But, devoting more resources to finding root causes and better treatment for those who truly suffer from it should be a priority.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Axil View Post
    I happen to think "better diagnosis, awareness, changing criteria" are pretty good points. Though i might leave off the "better". Slow adoption is found in the medical community just as everywhere else. It's not a matter of paying attention but understanding, and coming to terms with the new criteria.
    They are only good points to a minor degree. As I said, the criteria hasn't changed since DSM-IV (1994), with a minor revision in DSM-IV TR (2000). It has already been determined that the change of criteria cannot account for the entire increase. How much is certainly up for debate, but for the medical/scientific community to suggest that it is a large part of it is disingenuous and a bit disconcerting when you consider that means they are basically saying they are asleep at the wheel when it comes to their craft. It's not like this is a newly discovered condition, and the DSM is basically just a list of diagnosing/billing codes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Axil View Post
    Understand that there is no objective test for autism. You can't do a blood test. It won't show up on an MRI. It's diagnosed by behavior only, which is why i scratch my head when i read "better diagnosis".
    There are some imaging techniques that show consistent patterns in the brain of autistics, particularly SPECT scans. As to the subjectivity of diagnosis, I agree with you, but only to the point of very high-functioning kids. Any clinician worth their salt isn't missing kids like mine (low and medium functioning) and there are plenty of them around.

    Quote Originally Posted by Axil View Post
    Add to that the amount of money that is allocated to the treatment of Autism, of from a pharmaceutical standpoint, and the amount of money and resources allocated to government entities, and you'll begin to understand my skepticism that this is indeed an epidemic.
    There is very little money allocated for autism from a research standpoint when you consider the size of the potential cohort. There is next to nothing in the form of treatment as mostly everything is excluded from an insurance standpoint and practically all pharmaceutical applications are administered off-label as an attempt to address "behaviors". Not sure what money and resources you are referring to with regard to "government entities", but I can assure you that there is very little that has been done by CDC, NIH, NIMH and IACC in the 13 years I've been paying attention, unless you really like MRI studies.

    I am puzzled by your questioning whether it's an epidemic. You either believe the number of 1-50, up from 1 in 5,000 in the 1990s is real or you don't. Either way, it's an epidemic number when compared to previous disease epidemics.

    Quote Originally Posted by Axil View Post
    I do believe there has been an increase in autism rates, i just believe that the data is so polluted that is difficult to quantify how much.
    I agree that it is difficult to quantify the prevalence, but that doesn't change the fact that there is a population that is rapidly increasing whose problems need to be addressed. Looking to figure out how much is a true increase is a luxury these families (self included) and this country can ill-afford. We as parents are going to die, leaving behind a large population of children, a generation, that cannot take care of itself. And that will become a very expensive question to have to answer.

    Quote Originally Posted by quantum View Post
    I think the autism diagnosis, along with ADHD, are severely abused today. But, devoting more resources to finding root causes and better treatment for those who truly suffer from it should be a priority.
    Count me among those who think the diagnosis has become very loosey-goosey. But it still doesn't explain the prevalence increase, there's simply more of these kids out there now.

    I wholeheartedly agree that our resources and monies need to be refocused on what you stated. Anything aside from the junk studies being put forth like this one from the AAP. Here they stated that ASD kids and non-ASD kids who received the same amount of antigens from vaccines whilst following the CDC schedule were the same. YOU DON'T SAY?!?! It's that kind of "science" that we are pinning our hopes on.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...le+Feedfetcher

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Jetworks View Post
    They are only good points to a minor degree. As I said, the criteria hasn't changed since DSM-IV (1994), with a minor revision in DSM-IV TR (2000).
    Again, i don't believe you can expect diagnostic behavior to change instantly just because the criteria changes. I believe it's reasonable to expect adoption rates to be gradual, and interpretations of the criteria to start off quite stringent, and loosen up over time.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jetworks View Post
    It has already been determined that the change of criteria cannot account for the entire increase.
    By whom? How could you make such a determination? As i stated before, i tend to believe that there is an increase above and beyond that which would result from expanded diagnosis, but i don't believe there is any way to quantify it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jetworks View Post
    How much is certainly up for debate, but for the medical/scientific community to suggest that it is a large part of it is disingenuous and a bit disconcerting when you consider that means they are basically saying they are asleep at the wheel when it comes to their craft. It's not like this is a newly discovered condition, and the DSM is basically just a list of diagnosing/billing codes.
    I think a large portion of the medical community believes that the increase itself is indicative of doctor's poorly practicing their craft. And believe that the current application of the diagnosis is resulting in inflated statistics and wasted resources.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jetworks View Post
    There are some imaging techniques that show consistent patterns in the brain of autistics, particularly SPECT scans.
    How often is this technique applied. Especially to those diagnosed as highly functioning. I doubt many kids being tagged with aspergers are being subjected to brain scans.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jetworks View Post
    As to the subjectivity of diagnosis, I agree with you, but only to the point of very high-functioning kids. Any clinician worth their salt isn't missing kids like mine (low and medium functioning) and there are plenty of them around.
    I absolutely agree that there are cases that are easily spotted. My question is if you only take the extreme cases, how much of an increase are we looking at? I've never seen that statistic. I'll have to go hunt for it later, if i find it i'll share.


    Quote Originally Posted by Jetworks View Post
    There is very little money allocated for autism from a research standpoint when you consider the size of the potential cohort. There is next to nothing in the form of treatment as mostly everything is excluded from an insurance standpoint and practically all pharmaceutical applications are administered off-label as an attempt to address "behaviors". Not sure what money and resources you are referring to with regard to "government entities", but I can assure you that there is very little that has been done by CDC, NIH, NIMH and IACC in the 13 years I've been paying attention, unless you really like MRI studies.
    In NJ our local school system has an obscene amount of resources devoted to children with special needs. My understanding is that a large chunk of that funding comes from the federal government. Government funded research for pharmaceuticals tends to yield a very low ROI. If you're right about private pharma not jumping all over it considering the size of the affected population then that surprises me.



    Quote Originally Posted by Jetworks View Post
    I am puzzled by your questioning whether it's an epidemic. You either believe the number of 1-50, up from 1 in 5,000 in the 1990s is real or you don't. Either way, it's an epidemic number when compared to previous disease epidemics.
    I do not believe 1-50 is accurate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jetworks View Post
    I agree that it is difficult to quantify the prevalence, but that doesn't change the fact that there is a population that is rapidly increasing whose problems need to be addressed. Looking to figure out how much is a true increase is a luxury these families (self included) and this country can ill-afford. We as parents are going to die, leaving behind a large population of children, a generation, that cannot take care of itself. And that will become a very expensive question to have to answer.
    I don't believe it's a luxury item, it speaks to how much of a priority this should really be. There are a plethora of other things that are more expensive to our society.
    Last edited by Axil; 03-30-2013 at 11:51 AM.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axil View Post
    Again, i don't believe you can expect diagnostic behavior to change instantly just because the criteria changes. I believe it's reasonable to expect adoption rates to be gradual, and interpretations of the criteria to start off quite stringent, and loosen up over time.
    And again, this is not a newly defined disorder. The changes made by the APA to the DSM have little to do with its discovery by Kanner and Asperger. I find it highly unlikely that doctors were unaware of autism's existence, to say nothing of their ability to differentiate it from Down's and MR. Anyone who has seen autism first hand can spot the difference.

    Quote Originally Posted by Axil View Post
    By whom? How could you make such a determination? As i stated before, i tend to believe that there is an increase above and beyond that which would result from expanded diagnosis, but i don't believe there is any way to quantify it.
    Well, off the top of my head I know the head of the IACC stated as much. I'm pretty sure there was a study done out of CA that did as well. The increase is very real, just how much is open for interpretation.

    Quote Originally Posted by Axil View Post
    I think a large portion of the medical community believes that the increase itself is indicative of doctor's poorly practicing their craft. And believe that the current application of the diagnosis is resulting in inflated statistics and wasted resources.
    Sorry, but I don't buy that. I think a large portion of the medical community is afraid to do some earnest soul-searching to see just how at fault they may be for the increase. Wasted resources are studies like I linked to yesterday. That's pure junk science that is being paraded about by the CDC and the AAP as a clear indicator that vaccines aren't possibly a cause on any level. Seriously, read that press release and tell me with a straight face that you feel that was a good paper. I respect your insights and I am confident you'll agree that it is tripe.

    Quote Originally Posted by Axil View Post
    How often is this technique applied. Especially to those diagnosed as highly functioning. I doubt many kids being tagged with aspergers are being subjected to brain scans.
    Not too often, but it shouldn't be limited by function. Really, my son is on the lower end of high-functioning, but I wouldn't hesitate for the opportunity for him to have the scan. I'm not sure why you are bringing that up as a point.

    Kids should be screened for a lot of things, especially before they are subjected to blanket health policies like vaccinations. If doctors who aren't up to speed are to blame for missing kids that may be autistic, it stands to reason they may not be up to speed with kids having underlying mitochondrial dysfunction or immune-compromising conditions that make them susceptible to a jab that would not affect most other kids. What then? An 'oh well', you need to break some eggs for the healthcare omelet?

    Quote Originally Posted by Axil View Post
    I absolutely agree that there are cases that are easily spotted. My question is if you only take the extreme cases, how much of an increase are we looking at? I've never seen that statistic. I'll have to go hunt for it later, if i find it i'll share.
    Good luck in finding it, I'd be interested in seeing it. Anecdotally, I'd think many would agree that we are seeing more of these kids. That is the view of laypeople, clinicians and educators.

    Quote Originally Posted by Axil View Post
    In NJ our local school system has an obscene amount of resources devoted to children with special needs. My understanding is that a large chunk of that funding comes from the federal government. Government funded research for pharmaceuticals tends to yield a very low ROI. If you're right about private pharma not jumping all over it considering the size of the affected population then that surprises me.
    Those are educational resources, and that is for special needs overall, not autism. The two are not the same. That funding has nothing to do with the research (or lack thereof) being dedicated to autism.

    I can't even believe you are talking about ROI and 1 million+ American children in the same sentence. I'm not naive enough to believe that there should be some sort of conscience based, no-cost effort towards helping out those with autism, but I would think the government would want to get something done to avoid the fiscal tsunami these kids will represent once they reach adulthood. They did it with polio, why not here?

    Quote Originally Posted by Axil View Post
    I do not believe 1-50 is accurate.
    Your prerogative. But what was? Was it 1:88, 1:110. 1:166, 1:210, 1:1,000, 1:5,000, 1:10,000 or have they been here all along?

    Quote Originally Posted by Axil View Post
    I don't believe it's a luxury item, it speaks to how much of a priority this should really be. There are a plethora of other things that are more expensive to our society.
    At this point, knowing that there is a significant increase should be enough, how much shouldn't matter. As for "a plethora of other things more expensive to our society", take a look at these numbers:

    http://archive.sph.harvard.edu/press...s04252006.html

    Right now, the cost is that of a generation of children. That's pretty significant, beyond the financials I linked to, wouldn't you say?

    I don't meant to sound contentious beyond debating the topic, so apologies in advance to anyone that may take it that way.
    Last edited by Jetworks; 03-30-2013 at 04:31 PM.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axil View Post

    I don't believe it's a luxury item, it speaks to how much of a priority this should really be. There are a plethora of other things that are more expensive to our society.
    Nothing could ever be more costly.

    There is not a more important thing on this earth than children. They are the most valuable natural resource. Not just because we love kids, rather it is bc our future as a society literally depends on them. It is one thing that we are crippling them financially but now we are also jeopardizing their health.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by copernicus View Post
    I have 2 students with autism in one of my special education classes. They are both wonderful and extremely needy. I care for them so much, but there are days where they need much more help than I can provide. There are some days where they are fine and others where they are so far off task that they become unsafe to themselves and others in the classroom. Just to get them to put their name on the paper some days is a huge accomplishment. Other days they run around the classroom, yell uncontrollably and sometimes act in a ways that are violent.

    The school system does not help students autism by forcing them to take state exams just like regular ed kids. Most of the school day is spent preparing for the state exam. It stresses out the kids with autism and other special needs to no end where they get emotional and often begin to cry and swear. It is heartbreaking to say the least. My current special ed class has cancelled all talent and music classes until after the state exam. What do you think will help a kid with autism more, music or taking a standardized test?

    There are no specific strategies for teachers to help those with autism. Their parents are usually so thankful that anyone tries to help.

    Sadly, their will be less teachers willing to teach kids with autism and other special needs in the future as long as the government continues the push to evaluate teachers by using test scores of kids with autism against them.

    Stressing out a kid with autism by forcing them for most of the school year to practice and take the state exam should be considered child abuse.

    Only in the US

    Crying and swearing about testing? See you did teach them something!

    In my daughter's school and others I know of in the area from talking to teachers each kid that is classified gets an aide. You need to move to a better district.

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