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Thread: Gronk Needs Surgery #4

  1. #1

    Gronk Needs Surgery #4

    @AdamSchefter: Rob Gronkowski has infection in arm, could be in jeopardy to start season... http://t.co/NRoMem2VdA

    @MikeReiss: Boston Herald's @RonBorges & @kguregian report that TE Rob Gronkowski to have 4th surgery to remove plate in forearm. http://t.co/udExO8TJ9L

    Ron Borges, Karen Guregian

    Wes Welker may not be the only important pass catcher Tom Brady is missing when the Patriots season begins in September. His biggest one may be absent as well.

    According to multiple sources familiar with the situation, tight end Rob Gronkowski has been battling a stubborn infection in the area around where a second metal plate was installed to repair his broken left forearm and his readiness for the season is in jeopardy.

    Gronkowski is nearing the end of a six-week cycle of antibiotic treatments administered under the auspices of Massachusetts General Hospital, but it is not yet assured the infection has been completely eradicated.

    Doctors treating Gronkowski will have to go back into the arm again to remove the plate and install a new one, but if they find more infected tissue, they would be unable to install the plate at that time. That would require another surgical procedure after the tissue around the injury is clear of infection and, sources confirmed, that would not give Gronkowski the required 10 weeks healing time to be ready for the season opener in September.

    Gronkowski, agent Drew Rosenhaus, team officials, both team physicians and outside consultants are expected to meet within a week to make a determination of what step will be taken next and how quickly to move. All are hopeful the pesky infection has been cured but they cannot be sure until the surgery to remove the old plate and the process to replace it begins.

    There are several ways the tissue can be tested, medical sources explained. There is a procedure involving freezing part of the tissue, there is a biopsy and a test that can be done during the surgery to replace the plate.

    If the infection has cleared, a new plate would be installed and Gronkowski would have sufficient time to be prepared to undertake normal football activities by the time the season begins.

    Gronkowski originally broke the forearm during Week 11 against Indianapolis while blocking during an extra point late in the game. Following the first surgery, he was out five weeks, but played in a limited capacity in the final regular-season game against Miami, then after a bye week, played in the AFC divisional playoff win against Houston.

    He didn’t last the first quarter, sustaining a new break just above where the original plate had been installed by team physician Dr. Tom Gill. He then had a third surgery in February specifically to treat the infection and has been on antibiotics ever since.

    That new break came despite Gronkowski having been outfitted with a protective cast made of kevlar, the same material worn in bulletproof vests. It was made of the same material used in similar protective casts worn by Rodney Harrison and Mike Vrabel without incident.

    While Dr. Gill performed the first surgery, he did not perform the second.

    Gronkowski made the rounds on ESPN this past week and did not let on to any issues with a persistent infection or discuss any upcoming surgery.

    “The arm is feeling way better than it was during the playoffs, and in the regular season when I broke it,” Gronk said on the “Mike and Mike” morning show. “Right now, I’m rehabbing, getting the muscle stronger around it. You want to get everything activated, re-activated, because it shuts down for a little bit when it’s healing . . . when my trainers give me the good-to-go, hopefully in the next couple weeks, as soon as possible, I can get rolling again . . . doing what I love doing, catching some balls.”

    So the bottom line is there’s a way to go before the all-world tight end is ready to play.
    Last edited by C Mart; 04-07-2013 at 09:01 AM.

  2. #2
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    Ahhhh, too bad.......

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by sg3 View Post
    Ahhhh, too bad.......
    Breaks my heart

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    Probably a rash from taking his shirt off all the time.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by southparkcpa View Post
    Breaks my heart
    Don't cry for me Argentina

  6. #6
    The gap is ripe for the slaughter.

  7. #7
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    Maybe he got the infection from when he DDT'd his friend on that dirty club floor.

  8. #8
    Gronk partying and wrestling with a recently-broken arm is no big deal, they said.


    that's just Gronk being Gronk, they said.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirtstar View Post
    Gronk partying and wrestling with a recently-broken arm is no big deal, they said.


    that's just Gronk being Gronk, they said.
    Playing with a broken arm and thus rebreaking it wasn't the brightest move to begin with. These players think they are super human and modern medicine can fix anything. They're saying Kevin Ware's career could be over before it started.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Vinny Testaverde's Niece View Post
    Playing with a broken arm and thus rebreaking it wasn't the brightest move to begin with. These players think they are super human and modern medicine can fix anything.
    Which is why its usually left up to doctors to decide if a player is properly healed to play again. Makes me wonder what and who was behind the decision to put him back on the field that day. Fractures, unlike concussions, aren't in some quasi-gray area of the unknown, medically speaking. Doctors know when a break isn't fully healed.

  11. #11
    Tyler Eifert to the Pats.


  12. #12
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    When he was in-studio for ESPN a couple of weeks ago I saw his hands on TV and thought to myself that one of them was really swollen.

    Any chance they might need to amputate?

    He'd still destroy us with one arm.

  13. #13
    Hospitals these days are scary. Infections abound people are getting ever resistant to antibiotics. Gronk will be fine, but there are elderly people who die from this kind of stuff all the time. Pretty scary really.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luthier View Post
    Hospitals these days are scary. Infections abound people are getting ever resistant to antibiotics. Gronk will be fine, but there are elderly people who die from this kind of stuff all the time. Pretty scary really.
    While hospitals can be sources of these infections, for professional athletes the cause is more usually secondary to MRSA that they are susceptible to due to training equipment and whirlpools at the facilities they train in. A large proportion of professional athletes are chronic MRSA carriers...Manning, Brady etc had similar issues. These MRSA strains can be awfully resistant to antibiotics too.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Greenwave81 View Post
    While hospitals can be sources of these infections, for professional athletes the cause is more usually secondary to MRSA that they are susceptible to due to training equipment and whirlpools at the facilities they train in. A large proportion of professional athletes are chronic MRSA carriers...Manning, Brady etc had similar issues. These MRSA strains can be awfully resistant to antibiotics too.
    Yup. I was hospitalized for MRSA, my doctor thought I contracted it from my jiu jitsu class.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenwave81 View Post
    While hospitals can be sources of these infections, for professional athletes the cause is more usually secondary to MRSA that they are susceptible to due to training equipment and whirlpools at the facilities they train in. A large proportion of professional athletes are chronic MRSA carriers...Manning, Brady etc had similar issues. These MRSA strains can be awfully resistant to antibiotics too.
    I would think someone with a fracture and a healing sutured surgical site would stay out of a whirlpool, as he was no doubt instructed. And what training would he have been doing? As the OP you replied to said, hospitals are the best place to get an infection these days and it doesn't just kill old people, in CA nearly half the deaths were suffered by people under 64. I am going to a funeral tomorrow for someone who died at 56 after a stroke, there was surgery and 'complications', I will be interested to learn what those were.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vinny Testaverde's Niece View Post
    I would think someone with a fracture and a healing sutured surgical site would stay out of a whirlpool, as he was no doubt instructed. And what training would he have been doing? As the OP you replied to said, hospitals are the best place to get an infection these days and it doesn't just kill old people, in CA nearly half the deaths were suffered by people under 64. I am going to a funeral tomorrow for someone who died at 56 after a stroke, there was surgery and 'complications', I will be interested to learn what those were.
    I worked in Kings County Hospital in the early 70's and asked a surgeon if he ever had one of those days when he was all thumbs?? He said sure it's called died of complications..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vinny Testaverde's Niece View Post
    I would think someone with a fracture and a healing sutured surgical site would stay out of a whirlpool, as he was no doubt instructed. And what training would he have been doing? As the OP you replied to said, hospitals are the best place to get an infection these days and it doesn't just kill old people, in CA nearly half the deaths were suffered by people under 64. I am going to a funeral tomorrow for someone who died at 56 after a stroke, there was surgery and 'complications', I will be interested to learn what those were.
    Obviously he wouldn't be in a whirlpool with an acute fracture...what I said, and what is true, is that a larger proportion of these athletes as opposed to non-athletes are chronic MRSA carriers....the bacteria is already part of their now usual skin flora due to past exposure, and it's hard to eradicate. Let's say he cuts himself shaving or whatever...the bacteria gets into the bloodstream and having a foreign body on a bone, like a plate and screws, is a particularly prone site to become seeded and infected.

    Do people get MRSA in a hospital? Yes they certainly can..but there is a difference between HA-MRSA and now the CA-MRSA..and athletes, the NFL in particular, are at a higher risk of developing an MRSA infection.

    http://archive.mensjournal.com/mrsa
    http://www.time.com/time/arts/articl...853828,00.html

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