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Thread: Idzik ~ ~ ~

  1. #1
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    Arrow Idzik ~ ~ ~

    Jets GM John Idzik is meticulous and highly respected

    Near the end of John Idzik's pre-draft news conference on Wednesday, a media session peppered mostly with questions about whether star cornerback Darrelle Revis would be traded, the Jets' recently hired general manager was asked about any concerns he might have about being viewed negatively if he traded the team's best player.

    Idzik's eyes narrowed, and he stared directly at his questioner.

    "I don't look at it like that. I never look at it as how I am being viewed,'' he said. "That does not enter my mind, to be honest. It is really all about the Jets and any decision we make, especially those of very high magnitude, we are going to put a lot of thought into. We are going to do what is best for the New York Jets.''The exchange was reminiscent of another one Idzik had, this one far more private, yet just as revealing about how the man entrusted with the Jets' future operates. It was nearly 18 years ago when former Tampa Bay Buccaneers public relations man Chip Namias was talking to Idzik about some of the decisions facing the organization, which still was struggling to emerge from a decades-long run of failure.

    "We used to chat about personnel stuff going on with the Buccaneers, and one time, he was telling me something that they were contemplating, or that he was recommending,'' said Namias, who couldn't recall the specific player being mentioned. "I was kidding around with John and said, 'Jeez, I don't know if that will be very popular. You could lose your job.' I was clearly kidding around, but he got very serious and basically said to me, 'If I ever do something that's in the best interests of this football team and it costs me my job, that's fine, because it's not about me. It's never about me. It's about what's best for this football team and what will make them a winner. If I had to do something for this team that I knew would help us but that I would lose my job, I'd do it in a heartbeat.'''It's something that Namias, who is now president of Los Angeles-based Athlete & Event Sports Public Relations, never has forgotten. It speaks to the very core of who Idzik is and how he goes about his job. Which in this case is the Herculean task of reconfiguring a Jets' franchise coming off two straight non-winning seasons.

    Hard work brings success

    Those who have been around the 52-year-old Idzik at various stages of his career believe he ultimately will succeed, in large part because of the methodical approach he takes and the courage of his convictions.Whether it is deciding what happens next with a star player like Darrelle Revis or considering which undrafted free agents to sign, Idzik's meticulous attention to detail, a willingness to gather information from a variety of sources within the organization and a lifetime spent around football bode well for his latest and most daunting task.

    The next steps come in this week's draft, which could be preceded by a trade of Revis. Whatever the case, those who know Idzik best believe he's up to the challenge."John will be very methodical in how he acts, and you will not see him flying by the seat of his pants. He will think things out very carefully,'' said former Cardinals general manager Rod Graves, who has known Idzik since the two were ball boys for the Eagles when their fathers worked for the organization nearly four decades ago.Graves hired Idzik in 2004 as the team's senior director of football operations, and the two spent three seasons together before Idzik was hired by the Seahawks in 2007. The Cardinals went to the Super Bowl after the 2008 season."John is extremely thorough, and he has a big benefit in having worked on the scouting end of it, in the administrative end of it and on the salary-cap end of it,'' Graves said. "He's very creative in finding solutions to salary-cap problems and all the complexities of the cap and contracts.''

    Building a team

    Idzik has put those skills to good use with the Jets, who were forced to shed salaries of veteran players like Bart Scott, Calvin Pace, Eric Smith and Sione Po'hua. The Jets have since re-signed Pace to a one-year deal, although it has been a financially challenging situation to deal with cap problems.

    Revis' contract situation ultimately may play a part in whether he is traded this week or perhaps later in the year."John and I spent a lot of late nights together talking football, talking philosophy, talking about what matters most,'' Graves said. "He's been around football all his life, and he understands the importance of what it takes to build a team.''

    Case in point : In 2004, just two years into the career of former Cardinals receiver Anquan Boldin, it was Idzik who urged Graves to renegotiate Boldin's contract rather than risk letting him get to free agency. Graves didn't necessarily want to make that move."I remember vividly a conversation we had about Anquan, because he was such a playmaker,'' Graves said. "We were trying to make a decision at that stage as to whether or not we were going to bite off the apple for a new contract. Once we signed that deal, it took a year or two, but we felt like we had a great deal in our pockets. I give John credit for having the vision and foresight to understand what the [contract] numbers meant for us then and down the road.''

    Graves, the son of former Eagles personnel man Jackie Graves, first met Idzik when the two hung around Eagles' camp in the early 1970s. Idzik's father, John, a lifelong coach who went on to become the Jets' offensive coordinator from 1976-79, brought his son to training camp, where he and Graves got to know each other during the summers they spent there. Graves had lost touch with Idzik over the years, but reconnected when he went on a scouting assignment at Duke, where Idzik was a graduate assistant football coach for the Blue Devils in 1991-92."As ball boys, we were just kids, having fun and being around players like Harold Carmichael and other guys that were heroes to us,'' Graves said. "Once we reconnected, I followed John, and when we had a chance to hire him in Arizona, it was at a very opportune time. He did a lot for our organization.''

    Gaining valuable experience

    The message is the same from just about everyone who has worked with Idzik: hard working, smart, deliberate, thorough and passionate about the sport he'd grown up a part of with his dad's assorted jobs. John Idzik Sr., who is 84 and suffers from dementia, was a fullback at the University of Maryland in the 1940s and went on to a career in coaching. He worked with 10 organizations in a 27-year period, and eventually coached the Jets' quarterbacks and called plays for head coach Walt Michaels. The two parted ways after Idzik disagreed with Michaels about whether Richard Todd should have been the Jets' starter. Idzik preferred Todd, while Michaels settled on Matt Robinson in what had been a heated quarterback controversy.

    The younger Idzik attended Jets' training camps at Hofstra, often driving to and from camp with former defensive tackle Joe Klecko, who lived near the Idziks' home in suburban Philadelphia. Idzik was a receiver at Dartmouth when he got to know Klecko."His dad and I would ride together all the time,'' Klecko recalled in an interview. "His family was a football-oriented family. His dad played and coached, so Johnny was always built around football. I think he learned from his father the coaching side of it was harder than the management side, so I guess he chose a more direct route.

    "I think his dad was a class guy," Klecko said. "It was very subdued as far as John was concerned. There was never an argument with Walt and him. John wasn't going to win that. He handled it like a gentleman and a trouper. You never heard a lot of rhetoric.''

    Klecko believes the coach's son will do well in his new role, despite the challenges ahead. But only if Jets owner Woody Johnson gives him the latitude -- and the time -- to fix what's wrong."We all understand how teams work and there's one guy who calls the shots and he writes the checks and if that guy [Johnson] wants him to rearrange things and do well for making his team a winner, I think giving [Idzik the reins is a positive thing for Mr. Johnson.''

    Any particular advice for Idzik?

    "He's got to gain some weight,'' Klecko cracked. "He's too skinny. He has to be able to look like a tough guy. As far as his ability, though, he's well prepared. I have nothing but high regard for him doing the job.''Dartmouth coach Buddy Teevens first met Idzik when the two played at the school; Teevens was a senior quarterback, while Izdik was a freshman receiver. Teevens noticed even then that Idzik was willing to put in the work to get better . . . even if his upside was limited."The good Lord may not have blessed John with speed, but he had a quick, reactive mind and good hands, and he worked to be very meticulous and very specific with what he did,'' said Teevens, who keeps in contact with Idzik. "I think that's the way he approaches his job now. Football is hugely important to him, studying, evaluating.''

    Enjoying his work

    After graduating from Dartmouth, Idzik coached receivers at the University of Buffalo and then decided to join the corporate world. He worked at IBM for six years, but longed to make a living at his passion.

    In 1990, he was an assistant coach with the Aberdeen Oilers of the British American Football League, and joined Duke as a graduate assistant. Two years later, he was hired by the Bucs."John's personality is very even-keeled, so it's tough to rattle him or ruffle him,'' Teevens said. "He's very prepared, and, given the environment, I think his personality fits the needs of the job. He'll do his research, do his homework, establish the relationship and get the job done. He's a grinder. I think it's a wonderful selection.''

    Falcons president Rich McKay, the former GM of the Buccaneers who gave Idzik his first job in the NFL as a personnel assistant in 1993, believes Idzik is up to the task."He's as hard working as you're going to get,'' McKay said of Idzik, who eventually became the Bucs' assistant general manager. "He's very dedicated, and he does not like to lose, so he has a lot of those good traits. A very smart guy. I turned the negotiating and salary-cap stuff over to John pretty quickly because he was so good at it. He was very bright and did a great job.

    "His work ethic was off the charts,'' McKay said. "When we were in free agency, he pulled all-nighters many times. That's who he is. Jerry Angelo and I might have at some point said to John, 'That's enough,' but he wouldn't have it.''McKay remembers when former Bucs coach Tony Dungy issued a somewhat informal edict that everyone in the building had to go home to their families, lest they risk burnout."Tony didn't want the coaches to stay all night, and that became a sore subject between John and I,'' McKay said. "We'd get to Thursday, and we didn't want anyone working past 8 p.m., but John was having none of that. He's a working fool.''

    One of Idzik's biggest deals in Tampa was negotiating the contract for former Jets wide receiver Keyshawn Johnson, who was traded to the Bucs in 2000 for two first-round picks. Even Johnson came away impressed with Idzik's talents."He's a good man,'' Johnson said. "John will do a good job with the Jets. He knows football. He's very, very sound.''

    Cardinals general manager Steve Keim, who has been with the organization since 1999, said Idzik's background offers a unique perspective for his new job."John is a guy that I have a great deal of respect for,'' Keim said. "Coming up through the scouting department, John was always thought of in many league circles as a money guy, as a salary-cap guru. That, to me, is the farthest thing from the truth. John's dad was a successful NFL coach so John's been around it since he was a child. The first impression John made on me was that he isn't just a money guy, but when I say that he does have a tremendous amount of knowledge when it comes to the salary cap, business in general.

    "But John is also a football guy. He knows players, he knows talent. He has a unique eye for evaluating players. And I think he's one of those guys when I look at the big picture and spectrum in the NFL, he's one of those general managers who has it all. He has the ability to do the business and the managing side, the money side, as well as understanding the talent side. A lot of general managers have strengths and weaknesses. I don't see where John has any weaknesses.''

    Seahawks general manager John Schneider, who worked alongside Idzik before the Jets hired him, is also impressed with his credentials."I met him a long time ago as a pro scout, so I know he was scouting before he got into the whole cap stuff,'' Schneider said. 'He did the cap stuff because when the cap came into effect he was the smartest man in the building to negotiate contracts. Those guys tend to get [pigeonholed].

    "He's an incredibly smart, very patient football man,'' Schneider said. "He's one of those guys that, when you talk about general managing, people don't necessarily understand what that term is. It's not just evaluating talent, it's working with every department, budgets in every department, managing people, evaluating people, doctors, trainers, scouts. There's a lot that goes into it and he's seen it all. He has all the experience. He's never a guy who panics or gets frustrated. He's a real even-keeled guy and that's the thing, in my opinion, why he's going to be so successful there.''

    > http://www.newsday.com/sports/footba...cted-1.5111058

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    Jets most likely will get a third-round pick in 2014 for Revis

    At a time when plenty of Jets fans are feeling gloomy about the trade that sent cornerback Darrelle Revis to Tampa, there’s a tiny silver lining in the dark cloud over Gotham.Per a source with knowledge of the trade terms, the fourth-round pick that the Bucs owe the Jets in 2014 upgrades to a third-round pick based only on the player’s presence on the Tampa Bay offseason roster in 2014.

    We don’t know the precise date on which the pick enhances, but it falls at some point between the start of the 2014 waiver period and the 2014 draft.As a practical matter, the specific date doesn’t matter. It’s highly unlikely that the Buccaneers will cut Revis after one year, especially since his $13 million base salary for 2014 doesn’t vest until the first week of the 2014 regular season.

    So, barring a highly unlikely development, the Jets will get a first-round pick in 2013 and a third-round pick in 2014 for Revis.

    > http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com...014-for-revis/

  3. #3
    They would have got a compensation 3rd rounder if he walked anyway.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by FF2® View Post
    They would have got a compensation 3rd rounder if he walked anyway.
    They got the #13 this year. But hey, lets only include stuff that makes the Jets look bad.

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    Jets brass remains optimistic post-Revis

    New York Jets brass held a conference call with the media Sunday evening following the trade of star cornerback Darrelle Revis. The Jets shipped one of their top players in franchise history to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers for a first-round pick this year and a conditional third- or fourth-round pick in 2014.

    Most view trading Revis as a tremendous talent dump for the Jets. Revis, when healthy, is a top-10 player in the NFL. New York will not get that kind of elite player in return with the No. 13 overall pick on Thursday.However, New York general manager John Idzik, coach Rex Ryan and owner Woody Johnson were all on board that this was the best decision for the Jets. Idzik also made it clear that other factors were involved, such as health and a looming contract extension in 2014 that made it unlikely Revis would remain a Jet long term.

    "It became abundantly clear to us that his value was such that we wouldn’t get there," Idzik said of Revis, who in turn signed a six-year, $96 million contract with Tampa Bay. "That just didn’t [match] with what the Jets had in store." The biggest concern for the Jets is this roster does not appear competitive this year. New York, on paper, could be the worst team in the AFC East and one of the bottom-feeder teams in the league this season. The Jets have a lot of holes and a lot of questions that the draft alone cannot fix. Now, the Jets dump their best player.

    Owner Woody Johnson offered a message to Jets fans that the team's goal is to win in 2013, despite these changes."There's never been a year when I haven't tried to win using everything that I have to try to build a team that's capable of doing that," Johnson explained. "This year is no different. ... We're committed to putting a team on the field that's a winning team."

    Ryan, who is known to be brash, was adamant that New York's defense will remain one of the top units in the NFL. To Ryan's credit, the Jets were the No. 2 pass defense last season, despite Revis missing 13 games. "We’re going to play great defense here -- I don’t even think that’s a question," Ryan said. “We’re a football team that has a No. 1 corner. We’re fortunate to have Antonio Cromartie here. So there’s a lot of factors that go into every decision.”

    Overall, the Jets made the right move to trade Revis. The compensation was a little light for a player of his caliber, but Revis was injured and Tampa Bay had leverage. But unlike Idzik, Johnson and Ryan, I think the Jets are going to experience some major growing pains in 2013 before this team gets better.

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/afceast/post...darrelle-revis

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    By Sunday morning, the Bucs and Jets had worked out the trade details for Darrelle Revis -- Tampa Bay's first-round pick in this draft and likely a third-rounder next year to New York. The Bucs had a contract done with Revis -- six years, $96 million, none of it guaranteed. But there was no deal yet. Revis had to pass the Tampa Bay physical, and if his surgically repaired knee wasn't healing to the Bucs' liking, this deal wasn't going to get done."If the physical doesn't go right, we're sending him home,'' coach Greg Schiano told GM Mark Dominik Sunday morning. Both men agreed on that.So two Bucs doctors, including head team orthopedist John Zvijac and director of sports medicine Todd Toriscelli, pored over recent MRI results on Revis' left knee, then met with and examined Revis. It went well, a source said, with the doctors satisfied the knee was making good progress. But there are no guarantees for corners coming back from ACL surgeries, and Dominik and Schiano couldn't know unconditionally that Revis' knee would recover to the level it was before he was injured last Sept. 23. Dominik, Schiano and the medical staff met for about 30 minutes without Revis, and then the coach and GM went into a private meeting. In that meeting, as Dominik told me Sunday night, "We decided there was not enough risk to not do it. At the end of the day, you trust your doctors to tell you as much as they can, but it's a decision really that came down to me and Greg. We had to be comfortable with the risk, and I can tell you we are.''

    After Dominik and Schiano decided, they met with Revis. The way the contract is structured -- $13 million per year, with $1.5 million in annual roster bonuses and $1.5 million in annual offseason workout bonuses -- the Bucs wanted Revis to know exactly what was expected in this rehab process. They wanted him to rehab in Tampa, and they wanted him to be a full-time offseason workout guy in Tampa.

    "I'm all in,'' Revis told them. "I'm a Buccaneer.''

    Said Dominik: "You could see how excited he was. The look in his eyes was, 'Coach, I will not let you down.' ''There were three elements to The Trade That Had To Happen. The contract was a big one. The Bucs knew they were taking a huge leap of faith, paying the 13th pick in this year's draft (Revis was the 14th overall pick six years ago) plus a third-rounder if Revis is on the Tampa Bay roster on the third day of the 2014 league year. (If Tampa Bay cuts Revis after the season, the Bucs will owe New York their fourth-round pick in 2014.) So Dominik told the agents for Revis he was willing to put Revis in the stratosphere with the highest-paid defensive players ever, but he wasn't going to give any guaranteed money in the deal. Dominik was willing to walk away after a year if Revis was damaged goods and not a great player anymore; but if he did, he wanted the penalty to be two high draft choices, not the high picks plus an immense guarantee. If Revis is a top corner, he'll get the money. If not, Tampa's out two good picks and Revis gets to make another deal elsewhere.

    The compensation was next. The Jets at one point in the negotiations wanted three picks for Revis -- first-, third-, and fifth-round picks. A week ago, Dominik said he didn't think the deal would get done. But a source with knowledge of the talks said Dominik dug in and drew the line at two picks, and gave the Jets a deadline to get the deal done. (SI.com could not determine what the deadline was, but it had to be some time in the last few days.) Another source said Jets GM John Idzik knew coach Rex Ryan didn't want to trade Revis, and was hoping against hope owner Woody Johnson would reconsider his stance about paying Revis a rich contract to keep him in New York. But that wasn't going to happen ... and Dominik knew he had a solid position. Because the Jets couldn't franchise Revis after the last year of his deal this season, they had to either trade him before the October deadline or get nothing for him but a compensatory draft choice in the 2015 draft.

    And the physical was third. Important, but third. Once Revis passed it to Tampa's satisfaction, this was a done deal.

    From the Jets' standpoint, if they weren't going to pay Revis, they had to trade him. Simple reason: They couldn't risk Revis going to arch-rival New England in free agency -- or anywhere without compensation -- in 2014. And in that respect, Idzik did a good job in getting the 13th, and, say, 75th picks for a player coming off knee surgery who the team wasn't going to pay, and everyone knew it.Still, it's a stark reminder that the Jets are rebuilding, and it'd be a huge upset if that rebuilding job doesn't cost Rex Ryan his job. Ryan knows that; everyone does. Ryan craves great cornerbacks more than great quarterbacks, and listening to him trying to be a team guy and go along with the trade Sunday night on a team conference call was awkward to say the least. There's no way he'd have ever chosen trading Revis over re-signing him. But of course, that wasn't his call.

    I agree with what Ryan must be thinking, for what it's worth. I understand the Jets could be going through a rebuilding slog. But Revis is 27. All indications are his knee is progressing well, and he'll be the same Revis. One right decision at quarterback in the next 12 months, and the Jets could easily contend by 2015 -- when Revis would still have four or five good years left. I just don't believe in trading great players you work your football career to acquire and develop and nurture. I'd have gone to Revis with a simple proposal: Prove by October 1 your knee is fine, and we'll show you the money, and you'll be our franchise cornerstone, the greatest cornerback in the game in the greatest city in the world. But that's me. Woody Johnson had other ideas. And so, of course, did Idzik.

    So Tampa Bay, which had the game's most generous secondary in 2012, will have Revis and Eric Wright at cornerback, with ex-Niner Dashon Goldson and Mark Barron at safety. As of today, the Bucs still need a nickel corner, and they're not sure if Ronde Barber will return. But the secondary has been upgraded in a very big way in a division with Drew Brees, Matt Ryan and Cam Newton filling the air with footballs."Where Darrelle will be on the day we open camp is on the field,'' said Dominik. "And where he'll be opening day is playing against the Jets. That's what I believe."Said Ryan: "You look at the big picture. I think this ends up, as in all good trades, one that benefits both teams.''

    If it is, the Jets will have to make as good a decision with the 13th overall choice this year as they did with the 14th pick in 2007. You don't find Darrelle Revises in every draft. If he's healthy, Tampa Bay got a great deal.

    > http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/nfl...ack/index.html

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by kelly View Post
    Jets most likely will get a third-round pick in 2014 for Revis

    At a time when plenty of Jets fans are feeling gloomy about the trade that sent cornerback Darrelle Revis to Tampa, there’s a tiny silver lining in the dark cloud over Gotham.Per a source with knowledge of the trade terms, the fourth-round pick that the Bucs owe the Jets in 2014 upgrades to a third-round pick based only on the player’s presence on the Tampa Bay offseason roster in 2014.

    We don’t know the precise date on which the pick enhances, but it falls at some point between the start of the 2014 waiver period and the 2014 draft.As a practical matter, the specific date doesn’t matter. It’s highly unlikely that the Buccaneers will cut Revis after one year, especially since his $13 million base salary for 2014 doesn’t vest until the first week of the 2014 regular season.

    So, barring a highly unlikely development, the Jets will get a first-round pick in 2013 and a third-round pick in 2014 for Revis.

    > http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com...014-for-revis/

    Most fans are not feeling gloomy... the sense I get is the majority knows it was a good move. The minority, lacks understanding, but not the volume to create the impression of generalized outrage.

    Dumb people always complain louder.

  8. #8
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    just florio being florio, an ill informed ambulance chaser stirrer of sh1t

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    Quote Originally Posted by FF2® View Post
    They would have got a compensation 3rd rounder if he walked anyway.
    It may have been a 3rd rounder - could have been worse - but even if it were a 3rd rounder it would have been a comp pick at the very end of the third round and it would have been in 2015...not 2014.

    Plus - comp picks are not just based on the player a team is losing - they are based on a formula that includes who the team signed in free agency that year as well.

    Thus, with the expected excess amount of cap room that will be available to the Jets, it's completely possible that the Jets will sign many free agents - or possibly even high priced star quality free agents.

    That could conceivably turn the supposed 2015 Revis 3rd round comp pick into a 4th or even 5th rounder.

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    OK. Now what, John Idzik ?

    The Jets have two of the top 13 picks in Thursday’s first round of the NFL Draft after trading Darrelle Revis to Tampa Bay. The trade will ultimately be evaluated by how Idzik does with the picks.

    Idzik is banking on getting players who can have an immediate impact. He said he does not view trading Revis as sacrificing the short-term health of the Jets for long-term impact, partly because he feels he can find some players in the Draft.“I wouldn’t characterize it as sacrifice,” Idzik said. “I think any time you contemplate a trade we’re always going to have both the short- and long-term interests of the club in mind because we feel like with the compensation we received we’re going to gain some short-term benefits. We’re going to get some very valued players on our roster.”Idzik has some options now. He is in a better position now to trade down and acquire more picks. It is possible he could trade the No. 9 pick and get another first-round pick lower in the round plus an additional pick. This year’s draft is not seen as particularly great in the top 10, which would make the Jets’ desire to trade greater but also make it tougher to find a trade partner.

    If he holds on to the picks, the Jets have plenty of holes to fill. Here are the positions of greatest need :

    Outside linebacker : The thought had been the Jets would possibly select Oregon’s Dion Jordan or LSU’s Barkevious Mingo at No. 9. The 13th pick could open the door for Georgia’s Jarvis Jones, who has too many questions to take in the top 10, but would make sense at 13.

    Guard : The Jets are replacing both guards from last year’s team. They signed Willie Colon as a free agent, but really need an immediate starter from the draft. Both Alabama’s Chance Warmack and North Carolina’s Jonathan Cooper are rated highly and could be worth the No. 9 pick.

    Tight end : None of the tight ends in the draft is worth taking in the top 10, but Tyler Eifert from Notre Dame is an intriguing option at 13. Eifert is expected to be an immediate star.

    Wide receiver : West Virginia’s Tavon Austin makes a lot of sense at 13. The Jets need an explosive playmaker on offense. He looks like one.

    Quarterback : With the extra pick, do the Jets roll the dice on Geno Smith? Unlikely, but an intriguing possibility.

    > http://www.nypost.com/p/sports/jets/...m_content=Jets

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    No other teams got into Revis hunt

    Last week, when the Jets pressed “pause” on the Darrelle Revis trade talks, some thought that another team or two could try to jump into the fray.

    It didn’t happen.

    In fact, it never happened. Per a source with knowledge of the process, it was always Tampa — and only Tampa.That reality kept the Jets from getting more than a first-round pick in 2013 and a fourth-round pick in 2014 (which will become a third-round pick if he’s on the Tampa Bay offseason roster next year). It also kept Revis from getting anything more finite than a pay-as-you-go contract that promises him annual compensation of $16 million, with nothing guaranteed.In the end, it was the best deal the Jets and Revis could get, because it was the only deal they could get.“If we had the luxury of time, if we had the luxury of Darrelle not having been injured, not having gone through rehab, then I think things would be a lot clearer both from our standpoint and in the case of potential trade suitors,” G.M. John Idzik told reporters on Sunday.

    He’s right. Only one team was willing to give up a first-round pick plus a 2014 selection for the hope that Revis will be back to his old self after ACL replacement. Only one team was willing to commit $16 million to him for 2013. (Though it’s not actually guaranteed, there’s no way he’ll be cut before Week One, when his $13 million base salary becomes guaranteed as a practical matter by the labor deal.)Perhaps most importantly, only one team was willing to do a deal that, if Revis goes back to being Revis, will necessitate an adjustment or risk his third career holdout.The thinking was that the next contract for Revis would have to carry enough guaranteed money to make him or his agents never complain again about his compensation. The Bucs instead have created a situation in which it’s highly unlikely that both sides consistently will be content with Revis earning total compensation that equates to $1 million per game.

    If he plays poorly, the Buccaneers eventually will have to explore paying him less, or possibly moving on. If he plays well, the Bucs will have to brace for Revis wanting more.

    Still, after blowing a first-round pick in 2008 on Aqib Talib and a third-round pick in 2010 on Myron Lewis, the Bucs will now gamble those same two picks on the chance that Revis will get back to form. If he does, and if he wants more money because of that, it’ll be a very good problem for the Buccaneers to have.

    > http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com...to-revis-hunt/

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    Revis would have taken same deal from Jets

    There has been much speculation as to whether cornerback Darrelle Revis would have signed the same six-year, $96 million, pay-as-you-go deal with the Jets that he signed in Tampa.A source close to Revis tells PFT that the player would have taken that deal, despite the much-hyped absence of state income taxes in Florida. (Just don’t buy property there.)Revis will likely be asked that question today, possibly multiple times. His press conference begins at 12:00 p.m. ET, and he’ll be doing multiple media interviews thereafter.

    Regardless of what he or anyone close to him now says, it’s impossible to know whether Revis really would have taken the deal because it never was offered. And it’s possible that the Revis camp simply wants to twist the knife a little bit more regarding the perception that Jets owner Woody Johnson doesn’t want to invest the money necessary to win.More importantly, Johnson never would have agreed to a year-to-year deal like the one Revis signed in Tampa because it invites an eventual effort to get more money, and it contains no protection against a holdout. (The deal Revis signed with the Jets in 2010 had three phony years attached to the back end that became real years only if he held out at any point through 2013.)

    So maybe Revis would have taken that deal in New York. But Johnson never would have put it on the table.The fact that Johnson never put anything on the table proves that, regardless of his reasoning, Johnson was ready to move on from Revis.

    > http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com...eal-from-jets/

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by FF2® View Post
    They would have got a compensation 3rd rounder if he walked anyway.
    Most likely they would have gotten the 97th pick of the 2015 draft (last pick 3rd round). However,
    1. It would have depended of what fa moves they make in 2014.
    2. They would have a $9m cap hit in 2014.

  14. #14
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    Wink

    so far,..SO FAR...i like what idzik is doing

  15. #15
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    Why the Jets Had to Jettison Revis
    A Team in Tatters Accepts the Loss of Its Pricey

    Darrelle Revis spent Monday holding a news conference, conducting interviews, telling everyone with a microphone or a notepad that he wished he could have stayed with the Jets.

    His remarks combined pragmatic pride—he understands football is a business—with a hint of hurt feelings.

    "I'm human," he told reporters. "It feels like that team is giving up on you."

    Why didn't the Jets re-sign him ?

    After all, he's the best cornerback in the NFL and arguably its top defensive player.His recovery from a torn anterior cruciate ligament appears to be robust.At 27,he's entering the meaty part of his already-great career.And with free agency onthe horizon following what would have been hisseventh season with the Jets, Revis had expressed a desire to remain with the team.Yet a better question might be whether the Jets had any choice. During a 1,018-word opening statement Sunday, on a conference call to explain why he had traded Revis to Tampa Bay, Jets general manager John Idzik turned a phrase that cut like a thunderbolt through his otherwise cloudy monologue.Retaining Revis, Idzik said, would have required "a deal of historical proportions," and by reaching a six-year, $96 million agreement with the Buccaneers, that is what Revis got. The franchise-tag value for a cornerback (the average salary of the top five players at a particular position) is $10.8 million. That means Revis's annual $16 million salary (which isn't guaranteed, mind you) is 48% more than the franchise tender, and it makes him, along with Buffalo defensive end/linebacker Mario Williams, the highest-paid defensive player in the league.

    Coming off of consecutive seasons in which the Jets missed the playoffs, Idzik already had begun the unavoidable process of slashing payroll to reshape the roster. Devoting so much salary-cap space to Revis would have been unthinkable. If Revis could have been the difference between the Jets' challenging for a championship and missing the playoffs altogether, Idzik and owner Woody Johnson might have met his demands.But Idzik wouldn't be the Jets' GM if they were close to contending; his predecessor, Mike Tannenbaum, left him this mess when he was fired on Dec. 31. The team will likely struggle to be respectable next season, and Revis's presence wouldn't have improved the Jets enough to justify the cost. (Of course, it might have made Rex Ryan, whom Idzik inherited as head coach, feel more secure about long-term employment.)

    Yes, Revis is the NFL's best cornerback. There isn't a close second, and the chances are slim that the Jets will select a player of the same stature with one of two draft picks (including a first-rounder this year) they received in this trade. But by drafting even a very good player at a more meaningful position—a franchise quarterback, an elite pass-rusher—the Jets in theory could get better more quickly than if they'd kept Revis.That context accounts for another interesting Idzik remark—that there was a "substantial difference" between Revis's view of his value and the Jets' view. Revis had twice previously held out, and according to a person involved in financial negotiations over Revis's career with the Jets, he and his agents argued that outlying deals signed by lesser players should be the market standards for his contracts. In 2009, for instance, no NFL team other than the Oakland Raiders (under mercurial owner Al Davis) would have signed cornerback Nnamdi Asomugha to a three-year deal that, in its final year, could have paid him more than $16 million. No matter: Revis wanted the Jets to match or exceed what the Raiders gave Asomugha. Last year, after the Bills—with one winning season since 1999 and desperate to be relevant—signed Williams, the goal posts moved again. This time, Revis wanted to earn as much or more than Williams.

    On Sunday, a franchise that thinks it is within reach of the Super Bowl agreed to pay what Revis believes he is worth. Again and again Monday, Revis said that he would have loved to remain a Jet for the rest of his NFL career, and that rings true. Staying with the Jets mattered to him. The money just mattered more..

    > http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...s_newyork_main

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by FF2® View Post
    They would have got a compensation 3rd rounder if he walked anyway.
    What would we get if you walked?

  17. #17
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    A team in tatters

    As described by a formerly great business newspaper now in tatters after being murdochized

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by kelly View Post
    Revis would have taken same deal from Jets


    Regardless of what he or anyone close to him now says, it’s impossible to know whether Revis really would have taken the deal because it never was offered. And it’s possible that the Revis camp simply wants to twist the knife a little bit more regarding the perception that Jets owner Woody Johnson doesn’t want to invest the money necessary to win.More importantly, Johnson never would have agreed to a year-to-year deal like the one Revis signed in Tampa because it invites an eventual effort to get more money, and it contains no protection against a holdout. (The deal Revis signed with the Jets in 2010 had three phony years attached to the back end that became real years only if he held out at any point through 2013.)



    > http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com...eal-from-jets/
    It's this line of thinking I simply don't understand and have no idea how profesional sports writers and organizations can continue to perpetuate.

    The Jets have always and will continue to spend the maximum salary cap allowed (for the most part) Not paying a CB $16mm a year does not mean he doesn't want to invest the money - it means he wants to invest the money differently. But regardless Woody will spend the same amount of total dollars.

    Honest question I'm hoping someone can answer - How does the media continue to get away with saying this?

    am I missing something?

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by kelly View Post
    <snip> Staying with the Jets mattered to him. The money just mattered more..

    > http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...s_newyork_main
    This is the crux of the whole Revis situation.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jungle Shift Jet View Post
    What would we get if you walked?
    a group hug

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