Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Abolish the NFL Draft

  1. #1
    Jets Insider VIP
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    6,172
    Post Thanks / Like

    Abolish the NFL Draft

    This guy makes some really good points IMO.

    http://reason.com/archives/2013/04/2...-the-nfl-draft

    Abolish the NFL Draft

    S.M. Oliva|Apr. 23, 2013 1:30 pm


    On Thursday, April 25, millions of prime-time television viewers will gather to watch a a middle-aged man read off a bunch of names in 10-minute intervals. This will go on for three days. By the end of the weekend, 254 young men will be assigned to one of 32 potential employers. Welcome to the 78th annual National Football League Player Selection Meeting, better known as “the NFL Draft.”


    The sports draft is an anomaly of the American labor market. In most industries new hires are free to seek employment wherever there's an opening. Even promising high school athletes may accept a scholarship offer from any college. But the NFL shield has stood resolutely against labor freedom since 1935 when Bert Bell, then the struggling owner of the last-place Philadelphia Eagles, convinced the rest of the nine-team league that poorly performing clubs should be rewarded with first choice of promising college talent. Under this new system, a “drafted” player could only negotiate a contract with a single team.


    The first NFL Draft took place on May 9, 1935, in a ballroom at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Philadelphia (where Bell worked before buying the Eagles). Bell selected University of Chicago running back Jay Berwanger with the first-ever pick in the nine-round draft. Bell then made the first-ever draft deal, trading Berwanger's “services” to the Chicago Bears for veteran tackle Art Buss. Bell reportedly balked at Berwanger's demand for a $1,000 per game salary. Berwanger declined to sign with the Bears and never played professional football.


    Nearly 77 years later, the Indianapolis Colts selected Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck with the first overall pick. Luck signed a four-year, $22.1 million contract in July 2012. On the opposite end of the spectrum, the Colts also made Northern Illinois quarterback Chandler Harnish the final selection (253rd overall) in the draft, earning him the traditional moniker “Mr. Irrelevant.” Harnish spent last season on the Colts' practice squad, where the minimum salary was $5,750 per week.


    This vast improvement in player compensation since the 1930s has muted any criticism of the NFL Draft as a restriction on the free movement of labor. Most commentators and fans accept on faith Bert Bell's original argument that the draft enhances the league's competitive balance. In reality, this “balance” is mostly the product of the league's 16-game regular season, which makes a year-to-year swing of one or two games much more important than in any other professional sport.


    Another critical (and overlooked) factor is the absence of labor restrictions for non-player personnel. There is no draft for coaches, general managers, or other front office staff. Competition for managerial talent drives innovation and improvement far more than restraints on incoming players. The NFL in 1935 had no professional scouting. Today, all teams have entire departments dedicated to player assessment. Eliminating the draft would not impact the need for, or work of, these staffs.


    Nor would abolishing the draft significantly alter the structure of the modern NFL. Regardless of how players come into the league, they are all subject to a salary cap that fixes total compensation as a percentage of football-related revenues. The present collective bargaining agreement further constrains rookie salaries, and roster limits prevent a team from simply stockpiling players. All the draft does is increase the likelihood that the most promising new talent—the players taken at the top of the first round—will go to teams with a demonstrated history of mismanagement.

    This should concern the league as it faces a rising tide of concussion-related lawsuits brought by former players. While the NFL tinkers with playing rules in an effort to make the game “safer,” there's been no effort to question the role of the draft system in promoting unsafe working conditions. Let's say Player X is a highly touted quarterback prospect drafted by Team A. What if Team A has a poor offensive line and a coach prone to recklessness with his quarterbacks? Player X can't turn around and negotiate with Team B, which offers a better line and a coach with a stronger record of developing young quarterbacks. Player X is stuck with Team A, and if that means he's out of football after four years, a record number of sacks and a half-dozen concussions, then so be it.


    The problem is that the NFL never thinks through the consequences of the draft system. League officials are far too enamored with the marketing spectacle the draft has become since the 1980s, when ESPN started televising the event. Commissioner Roger Goodell expanded the draft from two to three days to maximize the hoopla. It's part of the NFL's evolution into a year-round television reality show where the players are mere contestants. The NFL Draft may not be a sensible way to allocate talent, but it provides football-starved fans, media pundits, and “draft experts” with something to discuss endlessly between the Super Bowl and the start of training camps.





  2. #2
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    21,152
    Post Thanks / Like
    Some good points and some not so good points. If they did away with the draft there are a few dangers. 1) The salary scales would be even more top heavy than they are now as teams got into bidding wars over the next RG3 or Luck. 2) A league is only as strong as the sum of it's teams. Watch more teams relocate if the team sucks for 10 years and the owner can't get his new stadium built.

  3. #3
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Manhattan, NY
    Posts
    9,520
    Post Thanks / Like
    The logic isn't hard to miss. But, the draft is part of the NFL and while it'd be great for the top 10 picks (maybe top 25), it'd actually be really bad for the rest of the kids coming out of school.

  4. #4
    All League
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,247
    Post Thanks / Like
    Stupid article. The draft works on so many levels. Creates interest/parity etc.. No reason to abolish it.

  5. #5
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Mendham, NJ
    Posts
    12,640
    Post Thanks / Like
    Without the draft the NFL would be like how college teams recruit players. You want to know why Alabama has such a good program? They have the BEST players in the country coming to them looking to play for them. It would be an absolute disaster if the NFL didnt have a draft system.

  6. #6
    Rookie
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Waxin
    Posts
    530
    Post Thanks / Like
    Google the website name...

    Reason Online
    reason.com/
    "Reason is a libertarian monthly print magazine covering politics, culture, and ideas through a provocative mix of news, analysis, commentary, and reviews."

    ... I wish I could get the last five minutes of my life back.


  7. #7
    Rookie
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    666
    Post Thanks / Like
    If the teams without a history of mismanagement want to draft a player earlier in the draft, let them trade up.

    This guy type 10-12 paragraphs and couldn't reach this conclusion on his own?

  8. #8
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    6,374
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by sec.101row23 View Post
    Without the draft the NFL would be like how college teams recruit players. You want to know why Alabama has such a good program? They have the BEST players in the country coming to them looking to play for them. It would be an absolute disaster if the NFL didnt have a draft system.
    There's no salary cap in college football.

    College football teams have 85 scholarships available.



    I've been in favor of eliminating all of the player drafts for a few years now. Just add the rookies to the free agent pool. If someone is going to pay a ton of money for a rookie, that's just another player that goes into the free agent pool.

  9. #9
    Veteran
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,874
    Post Thanks / Like
    The fundamental problem is thinking of the NFL as 32 seperate businesses instead of 1 business with 32 independant franchise operations.

    The Draft is part of what the NFL got right, along with a Salary Cap and meaningful Revenue Sharing.

    People who want rid of any of these three pillars of the NFL's success do not wish it for the betterment of the sport, but instead for some personal betterment. Players want more money. Team owners want to outspend small market teams. Fans only care as long as it helps their team be the Yankees.

    No, none of these three cogs to the NFL's massive success needs changed.

  10. #10
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    7,629
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Arctor View Post
    The fundamental problem is thinking of the NFL as 32 seperate businesses instead of 1 business with 32 independant franchise operations.

    The Draft is part of what the NFL got right, along with a Salary Cap and meaningful Revenue Sharing.

    People who want rid of any of these three pillars of the NFL's success do not wish it for the betterment of the sport, but instead for some personal betterment. Players want more money. Team owners want to outspend small market teams. Fans only care as long as it helps their team be the Yankees.

    No, none of these three cogs to the NFL's massive success needs changed.
    You hit the nail on the head, The NFL has it right.

  11. #11
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    6,374
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Arctor View Post
    The fundamental problem is thinking of the NFL as 32 seperate businesses instead of 1 business with 32 independant franchise operations.

    The Draft is part of what the NFL got right, along with a Salary Cap and meaningful Revenue Sharing.

    People who want rid of any of these three pillars of the NFL's success do not wish it for the betterment of the sport, but instead for some personal betterment. Players want more money. Team owners want to outspend small market teams. Fans only care as long as it helps their team be the Yankees.

    No, none of these three cogs to the NFL's massive success needs changed.
    Every league has a draft. Every league but baseball has a salary cap. Every league now has effective revenue sharing.


    The NFL has an absurdly unbalanced schedule, which means that a team's record isn't representative of their talent level, and single elimination playoffs, which increases the unpredictability of playoff results.

    That's where the "parity" comes from.

  12. #12
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Van down by the river
    Posts
    22,376
    Post Thanks / Like
    It's an Onion article. Has to be.


    Go for it. Eliminate the draft. Then, go root for Giants.

  13. #13
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Manhattan, NY
    Posts
    9,520
    Post Thanks / Like
    Part of the problem with the article is this. If you are going to make the argument that due to labor rules and concepts the draft shouldn't exist, then you would almost make the same argument for the salary cap.

    And if you get rid of salary cap (and salary floor), AND get rid of the draft then you basically have something similar to European soccer where you have a few great teams in every league (though there would be only 1 league here, but more teams willing to spend), and the other teams would become feeder teams. Teams that care would go into massive debt to win.

  14. #14
    Hall Of Fame
    Charter JI Member

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    Valley Stream, N.Y.
    Posts
    2,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Not only do I want to keep the Draft, I wish the NFL would quit tinkering with it. I loved the Saturday noon start that they used to have. Gave me an excuse to blow the whole day drinking beer and sitting in front of the tube.

  15. #15
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    8,385
    Post Thanks / Like
    What a trollish piece.

  16. #16
    All League
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    3,696
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Arctor View Post
    The fundamental problem is thinking of the NFL as 32 seperate businesses instead of 1 business with 32 independant franchise operations.

    The Draft is part of what the NFL got right, along with a Salary Cap and meaningful Revenue Sharing.

    People who want rid of any of these three pillars of the NFL's success do not wish it for the betterment of the sport, but instead for some personal betterment. Players want more money. Team owners want to outspend small market teams. Fans only care as long as it helps their team be the Yankees.

    No, none of these three cogs to the NFL's massive success needs changed.
    This is right and why this article is wrong. They are being hired by the NFL, as part of a collective bargaining agreements betweens the players and owners. It's free market capitalism at it's finest.

    No one is forcing them to work for the NFL, they are more than welcome to go to the CFL.

  17. #17
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    21,152
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by fidelioion View Post
    This is right and why this article is wrong. They are being hired by the NFL, as part of a collective bargaining agreements betweens the players and owners. It's free market capitalism at it's finest.

    No one is forcing them to work for the NFL, they are more than welcome to go to the CFL.
    And in distant years past that is exactly what happened. Tom Cousineau went to the CFL because of more money. In the 50's a lot of top quality players went to the CFL for that reason.

  18. #18
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    LI
    Posts
    20,155
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Arctor View Post
    The fundamental problem is thinking of the NFL as 32 seperate businesses instead of 1 business with 32 independant franchise operations.

    The Draft is part of what the NFL got right, along with a Salary Cap and meaningful Revenue Sharing.

    People who want rid of any of these three pillars of the NFL's success do not wish it for the betterment of the sport, but instead for some personal betterment. Players want more money. Team owners want to outspend small market teams. Fans only care as long as it helps their team be the Yankees.

    No, none of these three cogs to the NFL's massive success needs changed.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Follow Us