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Thread: O dept. : Marty Ball ! !

  1. #81
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    As the Jets’ June minicamp neared a conclusion, offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg said that he had “flooded” his players with a lot of information and that he wished he had more time for reps.Mornhinweg won’t have to wait too much longer for those reps and Jets Nation hopes that the accomplished play-caller will provide the offense a much-needed lifejacket.

    “We’ll certainly use the West Coast terminology, but the West Coast system is a timing, efficient, quarterback-driven type of offense that runs the ball in a physical, deceptive manner,” he said after joining the Jets.For much of the past two seasons, the offense has sprung too many leaks. While ball security issues have been well-documented, the lack of chunk plays from the Green & White has been equally glaring.The Jets tied for last in the NFL last season with 37 giveaways and their 71 over the course of the past two seasons places them 31st overall. On average, New York’s AFC representative turned it over 2.3 and 2.1 times a contest respectively in 2012 and 2011.But it is not like the Jets have been wheeling and dealing with a high-risk, high-reward attack. The Jets combined to total an NFL-low 93 plays of 20 yards during that time as they dipped to 45 in ’12 after producing 48 in ’11.

    Teams can’t score points if they don’t have the ball. And even if you have the football — it makes things awfully difficult when explosion plays are hard to come by. The NFL is a points league and the Jets averaged 17.6 points a contest last season. The offense failed to produce more than 10 points in eight games.The Mornhinweg resume speaks for itself, having orchestrated record-setting offenses with the Eagles and the 49ers. “We’ll utilize many different personnel groupings and we’ll certainly use all the eligible receivers and runners,” he said. “It’s my responsibility to get the football to our best players, our playmakers a little bit more.”The Jets’ No. 1 playmaker is busting his tail, trying to get back to full health after suffering a Grade 4 Lisfranc injury last October.“I’m excited to get him back on the field. We’ll have a plan ready,” Mornhinweg told me of Holmes on a “Jets Talk LIVE” installment. “We’ve already thought about it and tentatively devised the plan for him in training camp to get him to the regular season games.”

    “It’s going to be a fun season for us this year. The receivers are really loving the system,” Tone told me. “The quarterbacks are excited to be able to step back and just throw the ball all over the field. We definitely want to come together as a group and really rally behind our guys. Having lost so many guys, we’re going to rebuild, rebuild and rebuild, and hopefully get it together by the time training camp starts.”If Holmes isn’t ready by the start of camp, the Jets will continue to move forward and hope his progress is speedy. While Jeremy Kerley is the team’s leading returning pass catcher, there are the great unknowns of Stephen Hill and Clyde Gates. The Jets need Hill to become a polished performer while they hope Gates can become a dependable on-field target.With nobody truly flashing at tight end during the offseason, the Jets offered Kellen Winslow Jr. a tryout and he made an impact immediately.“You could tell that he was talented, a high level of skill and he was experienced…” Mornhinweg said. “He’s quite confident in his abilities in talking to him and that’s the type of player that we want.”

    A healthy Winslow Jr. could become the Jets No. 1 TE or at the very least push Jeff Cumberland. There appears to be some capable playmakers in the backfield in Chris Ivory, Mike Goodson, Bilal Powell and Joe McKnight. Goodson, who faces chargers after an offseason arrest, has 4.4 speed and doesn’t need much to go a long way.“I like to make big plays. I like to make the crowd move and find the open space,” he said. “When it comes that time, you have to lay into some guys sometimes.”

    “I’ll use all eligible runners and receivers and I’ll use the fellows that aren’t starters,” Mornhinweg said. “If they’ve got one strength, I’ll try to utilize that somewhere during the game and quite possibly multiple times. All those things are important.”But the biggest question for not only Mornhinweg but the entire organization is at quarterback. Veteran Mark Sanchez and rookie Geno Smith don’t appear to have any separation heading into SUNY Cortland.

    “It’s quite a tussle. They’re hammering it out here and they’ve both played at a high level and on a fairly consistent basis with an exception of a couple of plays in those 10 OTAs and this mandatory minicamp,” Mornhinweg told me last month. “With the exception of a couple of plays, they both have been running and running pretty good.”Mornhinweg, who has mentored five Pro Bowl quarterbacks in his NFL tenure, has quite a job at hand in terms of playmakers and passers. Not only do the Jets need good news on a health standpoint with the recovering Holmes and a possibly revitalized Winslow Jr. in addition to a rapid development of Hill, Mornhinweg and QB Coach Lee will have to re-program a turnover prone veteran quarterback or get an awfully talented rookie to play in short order.

    The water has been rough of late for the Jets offense, but the new skipper will look for smooth seas ahead.

    > http://www.newyorkjets.com/news/arti...a-bdba3d4356bb

  2. #82
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    Position: Wide receiver

    Projected starters: Santonio Holmes, Stephen Hill.

    Projected reserves: Jeremy Kerley, Clyde Gates, Ben Obomanu.

    The departed: Braylon Edwards, Chaz Schilens.

    Player to watch: Hill -- a no-brainer. The Jets are depending heavily on his ability to rebound from a disappointing rookie year. The physical talent is there, but aside from Week 1 against the Bills, Hill never played like a first-round talent. (He was drafted in the second round, but received a first-round grade on the Jets' draft board.)

    Hill must improve in all areas -- beating press coverage, sharpening his route running and, you know, catching the ball. He also has to do a better job with the ball in his hands, as he gained only 38 yards after catch on 21 receptions, per ESPN Stats & Information. In addition, his surgically repaired knee bears watching. He said last week that his reps will be monitored in camp.

    Potential strength: Well, they're young. That can be a positive, right? Except for Holmes, every receiver is an ascending talent -- in theory, anyway. The question is, how much untapped potential are we talking about? Kerley, a good slot receiver with deceptive, big-play ability (14.8 yards per catch), is entering the prime of his career in Year 3. Beyond Kerley, there are question marks. Hill and Gates are young and fast, but it's time turn those assets into production.

    Potential weakness: The depth is a major concern, especially with Holmes coming off foot surgery. Consider: Holmes has 358 career receptions; the rest of the unit has a combined 212, including 87 from Obomanu, a Seahawks castoff plucked off the scrap heap in May. This is their thinnest receiving corps since 2009, when they opened with Chansi Stuckey as a starter. (They traded for Edwards a month into the season.) GM John Idzik finds himself in a similar situation: He must acquire a proven talent. Even if this current cast stays healthy -- unlikely, considering its penchant for hamstring injuries -- it won't be good enough.

    Wild card: Holmes and his surgically repaired foot. He's expected to begin camp on the physically-unable-to-perform list. The big question is, will he be ready by Week 1? That's the goal, but he's recovering from a Grade 4 (the most severe) LisFranc injury. There are no guarantees. You can bet Holmes won't take any unnecessary risks because he knows he probably will be a cap casualty after the season, and he doesn't want to hit free agency with a bad wheel. Without Holmes, a borderline No. 1 receiver when healthy, the Jets won't scare anyone with their perimeter passing attack.

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york/jet...ide-receiver-2

  3. #83
    If we finish around 16 in total offense, the Jets are a playoff team.

    Now, can Marty do that?

    Odds are that he won't

  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by John_0515 View Post
    If we finish around 16 in total offense, the Jets are a playoff team.

    Now, can Marty do that?

    Odds are that he won't
    Thing is we don't need to finish in the middle of the NFL. We finish 5 spots better last season and the season before and we would have made the playoffs. Same this season, all we need is a couple of spots improvement.

  5. #85
    The roster is far from complete, the area of WR may still be addressed if someone becomes available.

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    The Jets offensive line will work in some new pieces to protect Mark Sanchez this season.

    Breaking down the Jets, position by position, as we head to training camp, which begins July 25 :

    Position: Offensive line

    Projected starters: D'Brickashaw Ferguson, Brian Winters, Nick Mangold, Willie Colon, Austin Howard.

    Projected reserves: Stephen Peterman, Vladimir Ducasse, Oday Aboushi, Dalton Freeman.

    New faces: Winters, Colon, Peterman, Aboushi, Freeman, William Campbell.

    The departed: Brandon Moore, Matt Slauson.

    Player to watch: The Jets are very high on Winters, their third-round pick, and they expect him to push for a starting job. They're rebuilding at guard, so they might as well go with youth if the kid is up to the challenge. The one thing that could hurt his chances of being a Day 1 starter is that he has no experience at guard; he played left tackle at Kent State. But Winters is an intelligent player and he'll benefit from playing between two smart cookies, Mangold and Ferguson. If he doesn't start immediately, Winters figures to crack the lineup at some point.

    Potential strength: Two of the top four players on the team reside on the offensive line -- Mangold and Ferguson, former GM Mike Tannenbaum's first two draft picks. They're the cornerstones. As long as Mangold and Ferguson are healthy, the line has a chance. Mangold has a lot of responsibility because he'll be breaking in two new guards. His play slipped a bit last season (he allowed three sacks, according to Pro Football Focus), so it'll be interesting to see if it was the start of a trend or just a blip on the screen. Howard was a pleasant surprise as a first-year starter, but he needs to become more consistent in pass protection (10 sacks).

    Potential weakness: Chemistry could be an early issue. The last time the Jets went into a season with two new starters on the line was 2008, when Alan Faneca and Damien Woody joined the party. At that point, the line was a pillar of stability, but new GM John Idzik decided to shake it up, declining to re-sign Moore (still a productive player) and Slauson. The goal was to bring more athleticism to the unit. They accomplished that, but they sacrificed continuity.

    Wild card: Colon could be one of the free-agent steals of the year -- or he could be an injury-plagued bust. With Colon, 30, it's all about staying healthy. The Steelers thought enough of him two years ago to sign him for $29 million over five years -- and everybody knows the Steelers don't spend foolishly. Since then, he has missed 20 games. When healthy last season, playing guard for the first time, Colon probably was the Steelers' best run blocker. On the downside, he committed 12 penalties. With his experience and run-blocking ability, Colon could be an asset to a line in transition. The Jets' fingers are crossed.

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york/jet...fensive-line-3

  7. #87
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    1. Great Scott: This barely registered a blip on the radar screen, but the Bucs made an interesting move by hiring former Jets assistant GM Scott Cohen this week. His title is senior personnel adviser, a newly created position. It just so happens the Jets and Bucs are Week 1 opponents, their first meeting since 2009. Now Greg Schiano & Co. have someone on their side with intimate knowledge of the Jets' roster. Cohen was Mike Tannenbaum's right-hand man for five years and he was around long enough under John Idzik to gather intel on Idzik's player acquisitions. Cohen was fired after the draft. Obviously, the Bucs didn't hire Cohen to help with only one game -- above all, he's an experienced football man -- but his presence undoubtedly will be a help. Teams are always searching for the 411 against non-divisional foes.

    2. Jets South: WRs Stephen Hill and Vidal Hazelton went from Mark Sanchez's annual "Jets West" camp in Southern California to South Florida, where they worked out with Geno Smith. You can't accuse Hill and Hazelton of picking a favorite in the anticipated quarterback battle. All the chatter about Smith skipping "Jets West" will be an old story after the first round of reporters' questions in Cortland. The real stuff starts now.

    3. What might have been: Imagine the pre-camp conversation if David Garrard still was on the team. Sanchez's roster spot wouldn't be secure, that's for sure. The hierarchy felt Garrard would've had a legitimate chance to win the starting job, I'm told, and it didn't consider Sanchez's contract untradable. Now that would've been a multilayered competition.

    4. Homeward bound: The Jets are part of a dying breed in the NFL -- teams that pack up and leave town for training camp. The number has dwindled to 13 teams. Frankly, training camp isn't what it used to be, not with the elimination of two-a-day practices. This is the final year of the Jets' contract with SUNY-Cortland. I suspect they will stay home next summer in Florham Park -- Woody Johnson's original intention -- although I know they will get strong pitches from schools that covet the Jets for camp.

    5. Woody owes: Forbes magazine released its annual list of the most valuable sports franchises in the world, and the Jets finished 14th overall (sixth in the NFL) at $1.284 billion. Ah, but take a closer look, as that number is deceiving. According to Forbes, the Jets have the most debt in the league -- a debt/value ratio of 58 percent. The Giants are a distant second at 44 percent. Maybe this explains why Johnson has curtailed his spending the last couple of years.

    6. Big Dee: He was overshadowed in the offseason because he rehabbed his surgically repaired shoulder, but first-round CB Dee Milliner will be a big part of the Jets' puzzle in 2013. If he can secure a starting job and play well, it'll allow Rex Ryan to play more aggressively with his pressure schemes. Milliner is thinking big. "There are goals I would like to achieve, such as being Defensive Rookie of the Year and making the Pro Bowl," he told his hometown Alabama newspaper, The Times Daily. Note to Milliner: Get ready for another wave of Darrelle Revis-related questions.

    7. Close to Hernandez: With the 112th pick in the 2010 draft, the Jets selected RB/KR Joe McKnight. With the next pick, the Patriots chose TE Aaron Hernandez. Someone in my last online chat session wondered if Hernandez was a serious consideration for the Jets. I don't think so. They were on the verge of trading Leon Washington and they targeted McKnight as his replacement. What's more, Dustin Keller was entering his third year, and tight end wasn't a priority. But just imagine if ...

    8. Guinea pigs: The Jets are one of eight teams participating in an NFL pilot program that will allow doctors and trainers to access medical records on the sideline. If a player gets hurt, his entire history -- including baseline concussion tests -- will be available on an iPad. If the pilot program is deemed a success, it could be used by the entire league in 2014, according to USA Today. Players' records will follow them as they switch teams. One potential problem: Players may feel it could hurt their market value, with other teams having intimate knowledge of every bump and bruise.

    9. GMum: Idzik has been on the job for only six months, but we already know he's not a camera hog. He's anything but. Idzik, who last spoke to the media in mid-June at minicamp, declined interviews leading into training camp. The media (and, by extension, the fans) would like to hear his thoughts on the eve of his first camp, but the only sound coming from One Jets Drive is crickets. Evidently, Idzik is taking a speak-softly-but-carry-a-big-stick mentality into this gig. He's expected to address reporters on the first day of camp.

    10. Stating the obvious: So Ryan says the current quarterback situation is better than 2009, his first season as coach. It would've been real news if he said it wasn't

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york/jet...fensive-line-3

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    9. GMum: Idzik has been on the job for only six months, but we already know he's not a camera hog. He's anything but. Idzik, who last spoke to the media in mid-June at minicamp, declined interviews leading into training camp. The media (and, by extension, the fans) would like to hear his thoughts on the eve of his first camp, but the only sound coming from One Jets Drive is crickets. Evidently, Idzik is taking a speak-softly-but-carry-a-big-stick mentality into this gig. He's expected to address reporters on the first day of camp.
    Damned if they do, damned if they don't....Go to work Cimini, go back to making sh1t up

  9. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Nut View Post
    Damned if they do, damned if they don't....Go to work Cimini, go back to making sh1t up
    sooo..i guess cimini is NOT on the top of YOUR christmas list

  10. #90
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    Marty Mornhinweg is teaching the Jets lessons he learned from Bill Walsh and
    Mike Holmgren.Marty Mornhinweg swiveled in his office at the Jets’ facility recently and grabbed a green folder, about three inches thick, from inside the top drawer of his file cabinet.“When I need a couple hundred dollars, maybe I’ll take it to the pawnshop,” Mornhinweg said.Never would he do such a thing. In that folder are documents that seemed better off preserved behind glass, hermetically sealed for generations of football-loving historians to enjoy. They are notes gathered during two stints for the San Francisco 49ers under Bill Walsh, the offensive mastermind who developed the West Coast offense that Mornhinweg has taken to the Jets.There are diagrams and plays drawn by Walsh himself. There are annotations of Walsh’s training camp schedules. There are excerpts from speeches Walsh delivered to the team.

    “And that’s only the beginning,” Mornhinweg said.

    He adopted many of Walsh’s practices, and he adapted a few others at other jobs around the league. In Green Bay, where he tutored a young Brett Favre. In San Francisco, where he worked with Steve Young and Jeff Garcia. In Philadelphia, where he coached Donovan McNabb. At his latest stop, where he is tasked with resuscitating the career of Mark Sanchez while also developing Geno Smith, Mornhinweg again deftly links the past with the present.He fashions himself less a caretaker of one of the N.F.L.’s more revolutionary innovations than a teacher who strives to connect with his pupils. He mentions Young not to name-drop, but to explain why Young’s decision-making on a particular play in 1998, against a particular defense, was shrewd.“If we’re doing something similar to them, or something that we screwed up that they used to screw up, he’d say, ‘So-and-so used to do this a lot,’ ” Sanchez said of Mornhinweg in a recent interview. “It’s normal. Just work through it.”

    An entire bookcase in Mornhinweg’s office is loaded with binders, of old playbooks and packets he has accumulated over 25 years. When applicable, he uses them as teaching tools.“Red Right 22 Z In — I mean, Montana and Jerry Rice made that play famous,” said Sanchez, referring to 49ers quarterback Joe Montana. “That’s a West Coast staple.”Sanchez compared Mornhinweg to a college professor whose class he enjoyed, and referred to their sessions together as “going through a history book of the N.F.L.” That book has chapters on Paul Brown, Al Davis and Sid Gillman, all of whom influenced Walsh in ways large and small.In meetings with his quarterbacks, Mornhinweg has been known to mention Brown and Walsh, who as a Bengals assistant formulated the quick, precise passing system that spawned dozens of acolytes. Many of the base plays in the Jets’ offense hardly differ from those crafted by Walsh almost 50 years ago.“Much of what we do here, that’s who I learned from,” Mornhinweg said. “It’s very specific, very detailed. Not just the play and how you teach it, but how you go about your business.”

    Fortune smiled on Mornhinweg in 1986, a year after he went undrafted out of the University of Montana. He was a graduate student at Texas El-Paso, and San Francisco needed an extra quarterback after Montana had shoulder surgery. The 49ers’ quarterback coach at the time, Mike Holmgren, had coached Mornhinweg at Oak Grove High School in San Jose, Calif.“I went there and threw until my arm about fell off,” Mornhinweg said. “And then when seven-on-seven started, I was pretty much done until after practice. I was able to step back and just watch.”He viewed that time with San Francisco as an apprenticeship. When his helmet was off, Mornhinweg rarely went anywhere without a notepad. What he noticed then — and confirmed 13 years later, when he was the 49ers’ offensive coordinator and Walsh returned to their front office as the general manager — was Walsh’s attention to detail. Walsh learned the importance of an organizational blueprint from Brown, and about every other night, Mornhinweg said, he would speak to his players about finances, expectations, travel. Every second of training camp seemed planned far in advance, Mornhinweg said.

    “He didn’t miss anything,” he said of Walsh, “and he was brilliant at it.”

    On his second tour with the 49ers, Mornhinweg tried to spend time every day with Walsh, be it 15 minutes or 45. From Walsh and Holmgren, he learned to emphasize seven-on-seven passing drills, when the linemen are absent, because that is when quarterbacks grasp their progressions before throwing the ball. As Walsh and Holmgren did before him, Mornhinweg gives his players written tests every week to assess their mastery of the game plan and their concepts. He will do so again this season, on Wednesdays.Sometimes, even coaches need to review their subject matter. That is why Mornhinweg, during off-season planning, will often turn to that green folder. He will refresh himself, studying directly from the source.

    EXTRA POINTS

    General Manager John Idzik said Saturday that the winner of the quarterback competition between Mark Sanchez and Geno Smith would be determined by a “collaborative effort,” but declined to say if Coach Rex Ryan would have the final say in the decision.A version of this article appeared in print on July 28, 2013, on page SP9 of the New York edition with the headline: Masters Of Football At Coach’s Fingertips.

    > http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/28/sp...s&emc=rss&_r=0

  11. #91
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    Rex Ryan, not John Idzik, should decide whether Mark Sanchez or Geno Smith gets NY Jets starting QB job

    The first-time GM believes the decision will be a 'collaborative effort' among the front office, coaches and scouts. That's like polling your aunts, uncles and second cousins about what type of appliances and cabinetry you should buy for your kitchen remodel: It’s not a 10-person job.

    As head coach, Rex Ryan should have the final say on who starts at QB for the Jets.John Idzik bit his lower lip, raised his eyebrows, scrunched his face and bobbed his head in simulated fear as he mocked the notion that he appeared relaxed two days into his first training camp as the Jets’ general manager.

    He maintained that preparation always pushes pressure to the margin. So, why worry ?

    Idzik’s meticulousness is fast becoming the stuff of legend in the Jets universe these days, but he’s taking that mind-set too far when it comes to his place in the team’s quarterback decision between Mark Sanchez and Geno Smith.Idzik maintained on Saturday that he’ll have “a pretty big role” in who will be the Jets’ Week 1 starter, which (perhaps unwittingly) undercut Rex Ryan’s authority. Ryan has made it abundantly clear this offseason that he’ll make the final call on the Jets’ starting quarterback after consulting others.

    Now, Idzik needs to step aside and let Ryan make this decision.

    The first-time GM believes it will be a “collaborative effort” among the front office, coaches and scouts, which is like polling your aunts, uncles and second cousins about what type of appliances and cabinetry you should buy for your kitchen remodel: It’s not a 10-person job.Ryan should keep Idzik and owner Woody Johnson in the loop, but the nuts and bolts of the decision must lie with the head coach, offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach.

    Ryan spoke to others in the organization late last season before benching Sanchez in favor of Greg McElroy.

    “That is my decision and solely my decision,” Ryan said at the time.

    And it should be again.

    > http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/fo...ommentpostform

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    After the first day of training camp, Rex Ryan declared wide receiver Clyde Gates the MVP of the Jets offense. Caught after practice, Gates smiled slowly and said a lot of people played well.

    Yes, but MVP ?

    “It’s just one day,” Gates said.

    Clyde Gates is catching the attention of the coaches.Now starting his second season with the Jets, the publicly soft-spoken, privately funny Gates has filled a void as several of the team's free-agent receivers and running backs sit during team drills at training camp. Ryan again lauded Gates after Day 2, and offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg added his praise on Sunday.“You talk about Clyde Gates, most track guys are guys that are super fast, aren’t route runners,” Ryan said. “I think Clyde’s a route runner.”

    First of all, Clyde isn’t his real name. His full name is Edmond Darell Gates. "Clyde" is just a nickname that stuck. He grew up playing basketball, which you can see from the way he goes for the ball. The Miami Dolphins drafted him in 2011 and cut him in 2012. But he impressed enough that former offensive coordinator Tony Sparano brought him to the Jets soon after.Sparano is gone, but the 5-foot-11, 197-pound Gates is winning over the coaches with speed and acumen.“And with that speed he has, the number one thing -- well, you’re going to press him at the line,” Ryan said. “Well, if you miss him, you’re in trouble. The other thing is he’s able to get off the press and he does a great job even on the top of his route. So we’ll see. I think the big thing is availability in this league is probably as important as athletic ability and so proving that he can be durable and all that kind of stuff is going to be part of it as well.”

    Last season, Gates had a concussion that caused him to wear sunglasses indoors to reduce light exposure. He was the player quarterback Greg McElroy confided in on Christmas night before telling the team about his own concussion. Gates’ advice to McElroy was clear: "You can't go against a concussion injury.”

    In the spring, an injured hamstring kept him from practices. It was frustrating for him and the coaching staff, judging from Ryan’s durability comment.“That’s not rough, that’s part of the game,” Gates said.

    Yes, but the rehab part of the game was keeping him from getting to know his new coordinator.“I didn’t get to see much at all in the minicamps,” Mornhinweg said. “He was in the tub. ... The little I did get to see him, towards the end of minicamps, he flashed big.”Gates spent his weeks before camp in Texas with his 5-year-old son. Since then, he’s been snatching deep passes from Mark Sanchez and Geno Smith, and giving the diehard fans who have trekked to Cortland this year something to cheer about.“He’s hungry and he’s showing it,” Sanchez said, “Showing that he wants to be on the field. He’s making his presence known. He’s going up and getting the ball. He’s running great routes. You can tell he’s really worked in the offseason. I’m proud of him.”But just as Gates cautioned against too much optimism after one day, it’s hard to claim victory after a week.

    “Up to date, he’s done a heck of a job,” Mornhinweg said. “Up to date. Now his challenge is to continue to progress.”He will have competition as WR Braylon Edwards plays more and TE Kellen Winslow Jr. gets back on the field. At some point, WR Santonio Holmes could create more of a crowd. But Gates seems like he doesn’t quite trust that this streak of good practices will hold out, and knows what to do if it doesn’t.

    “There’s going to be bumps in the road,” Gates said. “And it’s up to you either you’re going to lay down or you’re going to bounce back.

    “And I’m going to bounce back regardless.”

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york/jet...he-right-route

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    Try as it did, rain and lightning could keep the Green & White off the practice field for only so long. The Jets were noticeably excited for their first day of practice in full pads and after several hours of delay the team shifted to the turf practice field in Cortland Stadium in an abbreviated afternoon practice.

    Fourth-year TE Jeff Cumberland took the majority of first-team snaps at his position, with veteran Kellen Winslow sidelined with a minor leg injury. Cumberland was targeted several times by both Mark Sanchez and Geno Smith. Early in team drills, he stretched all of his 6’4” frame to make an impressive catch of a Smith pass over the middle of the field.Cumberland, who last season had career highs with 32 receptions for 397 yards and three touchdowns, has had to adjust to this summer's rotating signalcallers and build a connection with both quarterbacks.

    “I’ve been here with Mark for a while," he said. "Geno is just now starting to get into it. I don’t know who is going to be the QB. I just know I’m here to play. I know whoever is throwing the ball, plays need to be made and I’m here to do that.”Cumberland has also had to adjust to the West Coast offense instituted by new coordinator Marty Mornhinweg, the Jets' third OC in as many seasons. The departure of TE Dustin Keller to Miami this offseason has opened the door for Cumberland and the aforementioned Winslow to take on a larger role in an offense that promises to utilize their position more in the passing game.

    “Coach brought in the West Coast offense and that’s very tight-end-oriented,” he said. “Tight ends are used a lot both for blocking and in the passing game, so with my ability and my skillset, I feel pretty comfortable in it.”Despite today's schedule adjustment, Cumberland was excited about how his team looked in its first practice with full pads. He was asked how he felt after leaving the practice field late this afternoon.

    “The first day felt really good. I feel like I came into camp in good shape,” he said, adding, “With the rain that we had this morning and then coming back out, I feel like we did pretty well.”

    > http://www.newyorkjets.com/news/arti...e-b64716667035

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    After watching the Jets’ offensive line underachieve last season, coach Rex Ryan admits they had gotten away from dominating the point of attack and the physical style he loves. And Willie Colon — one of their new guards brought in to change that — said improvement isn’t just a goal, but a necessity.“This line has to be better. Not if we can, we have to be better than last year,’’ said Colon, 30, a New Yorker making a homecoming with Gang Green. “We’ve got to be more efficient, if it’s Mark [Sanchez] or Geno [Smith] out there we’ve got to protect him, got to keep him upright and we’ve got to give them a chance to do their job.’’

    The line didn’t do its job last year, as the Jets were next-to-last in the NFL in sacks allowed per pass play and 23rd in average yards per carry. Enter new general manager John Idzik, who added Bronx native and Hofstra product Colon from the Steelers, Stephen Peterman from the Lions and Brian Winters from the draft to give Ryan the type of linemen he wants.“They’re all the same kind of mentality — tough, road grader-type guys,” said Ryan, who had Peterman working at left guard and Colon at right guard, next to right tackle Austin Howard. “That also says something about your team. You bring in those guys because that’s what you want on your team. I like the way those guys are built.

    “The guys that jumped out at me were Willie Colon and Austin Howard. You saw the whole [defensive] line cave back about 8 yards. I might have been able to run behind that. Those big powerful guys, that’s what you need.“We want to run behind Willie Colon and Austin Howard third-and-1, and you know it’s coming, we have to be able to get it. We had that in the past ... I think we’ll have that kind of ability.’’

    Colon is considered the more consistent of the veteran guards, although Peterman’s power somewhat offsets his pedestrian speed. For Colon, the issue is staying healthy as opposed to being on injured reserve, where his last three seasons ended.If Colon, an eight-year NFL veteran, can stay on the field, the Jets could have a steal, an experienced vet with a Super Bowl ring, making a modest $1.2 million salary with the added incentive of coming home.“That’s one of the main reasons I signed with the Jets,” said Colon, who tore his Achilles in 2010, his triceps in 2011 and suffered a knee injury last year. “I’m not getting any younger. I felt like I could contribute and make a difference. I’m happy to be here.”

    “I just try bring my ruggedness, my spark, try to be the bell cow, so to speak, and hopefully add to the chemistry and we put it all together.’’

    > http://www.nypost.com/p/sports/jets/...m_content=Jets

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    Quick takeaways on the Jets' running back competition :

    Who is involved: The better question might be, who isn't involved? The Jets have five backs vying for playing time: Chris Ivory, Bilal Powell, Joe McKnight, John Griffin and Mike Goodson, who didn't report to camp for an undisclosed reason. The team won't say when or if he will return, but that is the hope.

    Chris Ivory joined the Jets after three seasons with the Saints.
    What are the stakes: Let's be honest, the Jets don't have a true No. 1 back. Not one running back has a 1,000-yard season on his career résumé, and that hasn't happened to the Jets since 1994. In all likelihood, it will be backfield-by-committee. That could change if someone separates from the pack, but don't bet on it. Privately, the staff is hoping that Ivory, acquired in an offseason trade with the Saints, can be a 15-carry-a-game runner. But he has never played a full season, so it's a bold projection.

    How the job will be won: It might not be "won," per se, but roles will be defined. Chances are, Ivory will emerge as the lead back. The Jets want to have a physical running game, and Ivory is a big, physical back with the ability to make yards after contact. The Jets say he has natural hands, but he has no track record as a pass-catcher, meaning he's not an every-down back. Goodson has the skill set to be the third-down back -- he's the most explosive of the group -- but his mysterious absence is hurting his chances.

    Powell has value because he can play on any down. McKnight remains an enigma, physically talented but inconsistent. Griffin, taking advantage of increased reps, has opened eyes with his vision and cutback ability. He's on the bubble.

    Projected winner: If healthy, Ivory will be the lead back. Powell will be the No. 2, spelling Ivory in the base offense. Powell also is the leading candidate to be the third-down back until Goodson returns -- if he returns.

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/afceast/post...s-running-back

  16. #96
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    1. Game on : I don't know if Geno Smith is the real deal -- too early to say -- but I know this: This is a real competition. If Mark Sanchez doesn't get his act together, he'll be an $8.25 million backup.

    2. Watch your words : Braylon Edwards was considerably less forthcoming with his opinions on the quarterback competition than he was on Day 1. You remember that, don't you? Edwards made headlines by comparing Smith to Russell Wilson, adding that Sanchez could be in trouble if he makes the same mistakes he has in the past. Evidently, the Thought Police got to Edwards, who noted that he could get in trouble for saying too much. I appreciate Edwards' candor. I think his opinions matter because he's been around the league for a decade. His watered-down comments tell us the higher-ups are trying to manage a potentially explosive QB situation.

    3. Ah, so this is an offense : Maybe it's just me, but the offensive operation looks a whole lot more organized than last year. The drills run smoothly and there are fewer mistakes in practice than last year, as far as I can tell. I think the Marty Mornhinweg-David Lee combination will help a lot; they're proven coaches. Does that mean the offense will finish better than 30th, last year's embarrassing ranking? Impossible to tell at this point, but at least it'll have a plan.

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york/jet...arned-on-day-7

  17. #97
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    Desperation Means Experimentation in New York

    The Jets are willing to try anything—and we mean anything—to spark an offense that was moribund and ridiculed in 2012

    For the price of free admission, on a wide-open practice field at the state university here, more than 1,000 fans watched yesterday morning as the Jets worked on becoming a certain kind of offense.

    What kind of offense ?

    Well, personnel deployment, and formations, and offensive schemes are forbidden from being reported—a policy most NFL teams share during training camp, despite the fact that anyone could grab a ticket and watch every installation from the grandstand.But we can say this: The Jets are open to exploring all kinds of ways to move the ball and score some points, two things they were among the worst in the league at doing in 2012.“It’s either that, or you better be really good,” coach Rex Ryan says. “And if that’s the case, then why create something?”Ryan’s point, there are a few paths to take when designing an offense in the NFL. Some teams keep it simple because they have a really good traditional passer. Some teams scheme for the unique dual-threat quarterbacks rising from the college ranks.

    The Jets are in another category: They don’t know yet who their starting quarterback will be. Mark Sanchez has four seasons of experience, but yesterday’s practice displayed his limitations: Of his nine passes in team drills, he completed just three, with one interception. Second-round pick Geno Smith’s throws stand out for their strength and smoothness, but he is untested against NFL defenses, which showed on a play yesterday when he held onto the ball too long then unwisely fired into double coverage.The Jets do know, though, that they can’t afford to be the third-worst offense in the league again—not if they want to finish better than 6-10—so they’re practicing with an open mind. New offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg is installing a West Coast offense that was extremely productive during most of his seven years with the Eagles, but the boundaries of his system are not the boundaries of the Jets offense.

    On the Road

    The last time Rex Ryan signed a traveling media bus, in Aug, 2010, he wrote, “Soon to be champs.” Three years later, times have changed. The Jets coach inscribed only his John Hancock on The MMQB RV yesterday, when he joined us for a quick interview (see bottom of the story) after the team’s morning practice.We hit the road right after Mark Sanchez’s press conference, bound for Ohio. Our drive took us around Seneca Lake, past a sandwich shop called “King’s Market” and over to Jamestown, N.Y., where we watched five (scoreless) innings of the minor league Jammers. Can’t say enough about the good people of Jamestown, whose warm welcome went above and beyond giving us directions to Ashtabula.

    Today, we’re spending the day with the Browns in Berea. NFL commissioner Roger Goodell will also be in town, announcing a partnership with Pop Warner to endorse USA Football’s Heads Up Football program, as part of a push to make the game safer from youth football up.“You’ve got newer-school players who are used to stretching the field,” receiver Jeremy Kerley says, “so he’s open to all kinds of ideas. He’s not just set in his ways.”Ryan drew some eye rolls in the public when he said yesterday that the Wildcat would be “part of what we do.” Go ahead: Is this 2009? Moreover: Is this 2012? Haven’t the Jets been here before, with a guy named Tim Tebow? There’s no way of knowing how much the Jets will actually use the Wildcat or, probably more accurately, a wider package of read-option-type plays, during the regular season. But Ryan’s commitment to this being a part of his team’s repertoire goes back to the notion of “creating something.”

    Ryan views the game with a defensive mind, so he uses an example from his days as the Ravens defensive coordinator, when a depleted lineup pushed him to use Adalius Thomas, all 270 pounds or so of hulking linebacker, at safety. “You better come up with something,” Ryan says. Essentially: Where you don’t have an advantage, you’ve got to scheme one up.Both the Wildcat and the read-option help an offense do that, because when the player taking a snap is a threat to run, it takes away the defense’s man advantage and creates 11-on-11 football. Back to the earlier point: Didn’t the Jets promise this last season, with Tebow? The hype a year ago—stoked by moves like practicing the Wildcat in camp practices closed to the public and partially shielded from the media—never came close to being matched.

    With former offensive coordinator Tony Sparano at the helm, Tebow only played 77 offensive snaps and averaged just two carries per game. This summer, though, people around the team say there seems to be more of a commitment to actually running these packages. The new quarterbacks coach, David Lee, spearheaded the Wildcat’s graduation to the NFL with the Dolphins in 2009. And Kerley, who has run the Wildcat for the Jets in the past, said one difference is that instead of having a so-called designated Wildcat quarterback, the Jets are rotating about three players.Then, there’s this: Ryan likes the advantage “even better” when a quarterback, rather than a receiver or running back, is at the helm. Does that open the door for Smith to see more playing time, or earn the starting job?While Smith was used as a traditional pocket passer at West Virginia, the Jets can see him in that role, a player with a strong arm who can also run. “I see Geno as an athlete,” Kerley says. “If you’ve got a guy that can really do that, and who can do it well, he’s going to be a factor.”

    One week into training camp, Smith has been holding his own on the practice field. Ryan gushed about Smith’s “96 mile-per-hour fastball,” before quickly adding that Sanchez has “a good enough arm” to start in the NFL. One practice doesn’t tell the whole story, but the feeling around the team is that while Sanchez had the early advantage, the quarterback competition is about even right now—and if it stays even, that bodes well for Smith.

    So would helping the offense be able to create something, in whatever way that comes.

    > http://mmqb.si.com/2013/08/01/geno-s...mp/?xid=si_nfl

  18. #98
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    That was quite a roller coaster the Jets forced Jeff Cumberland to ride this offseason.

    The former undrafted free agent thought he had been handed the starting job at tight end when the team allowed Dustin Keller to leave in free agency, but the good feelings for Cumberland only lasted until Kellen Winslow Jr. was signed in June.Cumberland was listed as the starter on the first depth chart the Jets released this week, but he said yesterday the Winslow move did exactly what new general manager John Idzik no doubt wanted.“It let me know that these guys [Idzik and Rex Ryan] weren’t playing around, and that I needed to get going and work harder and never let myself think I could ever take a day off on the field or in workouts,” Cumberland said after a training-camp practice at SUNY Cortland.

    Suitably motivated (he even changed his jersey number to 87 from 86 to signify a fresh start), Cumberland dropped 10 pounds, threw himself into learning new coordinator Marty Mornhinweg’s West Coast offense and reported to camp in what he describes as the best football shape of his life.The 6-foot-4, 260-pound Cumberland’s goal is not only to stave off Winslow and four other contenders for the job at tight end, but to keep all of them on the bench.“I know in my heart that I’m capable of staying on the field,” the soft-spoken Cumberland said. “I can be the guy to go out there and make plays as well as block and be a three-down tight end instead of just a receiving tight end.”

    Competition wasn’t the only thing that changed Cumberland’s approach. He tore his Achilles’ tendon in September 2011, an injury that the former Illinois standout admits put a crimp in the 4.4-second speed that had attracted the Jets to him in the first place.It was during the rehab from that injury Cumberland realized that being a one-trick pony — a vertical receiving threat — wasn’t going to keep him on the field.That point was driven home last season, when Cumberland took advantage of Keller’s injury woes by catching 29 passes for 359 yards (a solid 12.4-yard average) and three touchdowns yet still couldn’t seem to earn Ryan’s full confidence.As a result, Cumberland attacked this offseason with what he described as a strong sense of determination — a drive that wasn’t impacted at all by the former first-rounder Winslow’s late signing.

    “I can honestly say I’ve worked harder this offseason than I have any offseason before,” Cumberland said.

    Ryan said last week Cumberland’s work is paying off so far.“I see Cumberland kind of gaining his speed back,” the Jets’ coach said. “I told him, I said, ‘You look faster in [jersey No.] 87.’ I don’t know if that’s true or not, but he looked faster to me. I like the way he’s catching the football, too.”

    Cumberland said he knows he has skeptics but is convinced the best is still ahead.“I do feel like I can surprise a lot of people,” he said. “Some people know who I am, but a lot of people don’t and a lot of people have their doubts. I plan on going out there and changing their minds.”

    > http://www.nypost.com/p/sports/jets/...m_content=Jets

  19. #99
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    Transcript of offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg's news conference following the Jets' Tuesday morning training camp practice at SUNY Cortland:
    We’re in the middle of training camp. The fellas are working hard both on and off the field. We’ve got more than a handful of guys pushing through some little nicks. We’ve got a handful of guys that are unavailable right now. So it’s a great opportunity for some of these young players that are getting quite a few reps. We’ll open it up to questions.
    On if it is frustrating to be without Chris Ivory and Mike Goodson…
    Well, no. We don’t get frustrated because that’s part of the game. I am just a touch concerned about the amount of reps going into the season with them. However, like we just talked about, it certainly is a good thing for some of the young guys. We just acquired some fellas and they’re getting an awful lot of reps because of injuries. That’s pretty typical of a training camp. Bilal [Powell], just a little bit concerned on the number of reps he’s getting. We’ve discussed that over the last couple days. We certainly don’t want to overwork Bilal. I will tell you, he’s one of several that have had a terrific training camp. He’s shown up.
    On his assessment of the quarterbacks…
    Well, all four of our quarterbacks have done an outstanding job with their preparation as well as on the field. Now, I suppose you’re asking specifically about Mark [Sanchez] and Geno [Smith]. Mark’s had an outstanding camp. There’s been about a day and a half where he took a little dip. Early in the Green & White it was a little rough for him but I was proud of him because things didn’t go just the way that we wanted them to and then he hung in there and hung in there and then made a heck of a play right at the end there.
    Geno’s been similar. He’s had a terrific start of the camp. He did some very good things in the Green & White as well. And then he’s dipped just a little bit so he’s got to recover. I think he threw his first interception, two of them. Was it yesterday? I’m getting the days mixed up a little bit. We’ll see how he rebounds. Today was a little bit better than yesterday.
    On how the reps will be split between the quarterbacks in the first preseason game…
    We have discussed it. We have a plan that is not stamped, and we will continue to discuss that right up until we travel and we know who’s available. So the plan is still just a little bit rough there. We’re going to do some extensive work on that tonight for exactly, we have a pretty good sketch-up, but exactly the play time for each individual player as well. So when you talk about ones, well some of the ones might play a little bit longer because we need some reps and those type of things. Mark will, this is his game, he’ll start and go with the ones. Then we would certainly like to get Geno in just a little bit with the ones, then he will take the twos and we will progress from there.
    On if starting Sanchez is because of the rotation…
    Well, there’s a couple of things there, yeah. That’s a good point. First thing is, he’s earned it. He’s had an outstanding training camp, so that’s the first thing. The second thing is, he’s been the starter here. The first game would typically be his, but he’s earned it as well, so those two things kind of go together.
    On how the decision was made…
    Well, I’m not going to get into details on that. However, we certainly discuss every position, virtually every day. Certainly, the quarterback position is, in some cases, more than once a day at exactly how they’re doing, so it’s been a whole training camp type of thought process there.
    On Smith’s play lately…
    I expected it earlier and really, he did a fantastic job. He’s got to power through it, it’s just that simple. There’s an awful lot of installations. I believe we’re through number 10 right now and if you add it all up, it’s quite extensive. So he’s done an outstanding job to date and he was a little bit better today than he was yesterday, so I think he’s back on the rise.
    On what he has seen Sanchez improve on…
    Well, his consistency, his accuracy, his footwork. I will tell you, David Lee has worked his rear end off with the quarterbacks, exactly how we want this thing done. Mark has done even more than we’ve asked that way, both on and off the field. So they’re working diligently on basic fundamentals and technique, how we want it done here with the New York Jets. He’s done very well pushing the ball down the field. His numbers are up just a little bit, as far as his accuracy and his completion percentage throughout the camp from past history, at least the recent past history from the numbers that I have.
    On what he is looking for in a third quarterback…
    I suppose you are talking about the third quarterback position. There are several different ways you can go, there are even more than several, there’s a host of different ways you can go there. Typically I’ve looked for a player there that you have an inkling that could develop into a fine, fine quarterback one of these days. So that’s what we’re looking for there. Both of those young men are competing and it’s probably not talked about quite as much as Mark and Geno. That’s quite a competition there. They’re both doing an excellent job. Greg looks like he’s a gamer, did a heck of a job in the Green & White game. I believe he was 5-for-5 with two touchdowns. Am I right there?
    On if Santonio Holmes will be able to play in Week 1…
    We’ll see on that. John [Mellody, head athletic trainer] and his staff, best in the league, man alive, with that training staff, are working diligently with Santonio. Santonio’s in the right frame of mind. He’s getting it all done and we’ll see, we’ll see. It’s too early to tell. He’s progressing through the program that they have planned for him. The key is to get him healthy to rock and roll. I’d like to have him for a period of time because of the precision that we will need in the passing game.
    On if Smith’s running ability gives him an edge in the quarterback competition…
    We’ve talked about that in previous, I believe. Here is what we have with the New York Jets: We have a man that has led this team to two AFC Championship Games. He’s taken a little bit of a dip. He’s got a host of experience that goes a long way. He’s shown that he can play at a high level and his challenge is to play at that high level on a real consistent basis.
    And then on the other hand, you have a man that’s right out of college. He’s certainly ultra-talented. He’s done an excellent job to date with his preparation off the field and the production on the field. He’s done an excellent job that way, quite a little bit more dynamic that way.
    Those are two players that you have and it is a battle. Certainly your point is well taken that an active quarterback, more than occasionally, can pick you up a first down or two a game on third down, which extend drives, which equal field position and in many cases points.
    On anything to be gained seeing a rookie quarterback on the field the first game…
    I do think Mark’s progressing at a high rate. He’s done a fine, fine job. So your question is, Geno and the first game…
    On figuring out Smith’s capability…
    Well, we think we know. But you never really know until you get into really late games. Preseason is different than late games and certainly playoff games are different than late games. Did I explain that right? But anyway, it’s going to be exciting for all four quarterbacks. I’m excited to see all four quarterbacks play and move and groove a little bit and run the offense.
    On what he sees in the young receivers…
    [Ryan] Spadola has had a pretty good camp and he’s pushing through a couple nicks as well. He’s shown up out of Lehigh. He’s done a good job. He’s got a real chance. Now for most of those guys one of the keys will be special teams. There’s going to be a couple of fellas who make this football team with their special teams and then you become a good special teams player, not all but most of those players become really good position players for you at some point, and so that special teams is a key for those young guys at all positions but certainly that receiver spot.
    On if he will discuss roster cuts with special teams coordinator Ben Kotwica…
    Oh, yeah. I don’t want to get into too many details but this is a whole organization type of deal. Certainly Rex [Ryan] and John [Idzik] lead that thing and make those final choices. But yeah, we have to have input from every angle on each player to put us in the best position. We want the best football players that can help this football team.

    > http://www.newyorkjets.com/news/arti...e-20fbc2704da7

  20. #100
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    ~ ~ 3. Climbing the Hill top: It's still early, but WR Stephen Hill is the most improved player on the team. The former second-round pick has impressed with his improved mechanics and route running, so much so that receivers coach Sanjay Lal highlighted a particular play in Wednesday's receivers meeting. Hill could be the No. 1 receiver, because it doesn't appear that Santonio Holmes will be ready for Week 1.

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york/jet...rned-on-day-14

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