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Thread: O dept. : Marty Ball ! !

  1. #161
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    In an era in which highly-drafted rookie quarterbacks are getting the clipboard-and-ballcap treatment far less often, it's not shocking that Geno Smith is getting the opening day start for the New York Jets on Sunday. The man he's replacing, a banged-up Mark Sanchez, did the same thing four years ago after the Jets picked him in the first round. The only quarterback taken higher than Smith this past April, E.J. Manuel, is also slated to start on Sunday just 400 miles away in Buffalo.

    The kicker is, Smith and Manuel are coming in a year after one of the most incredible seasons by a group of rookie quarterbacks in NFL history. Washington's Robert Griffin III, Indianapolis' Andrew Luck and Seattle's Russell Wilson all led their teams to the playoffs, while Ryan Tannehill and Brandon Weeden claimed starting jobs and showed significant signs of promise in Miami and Cleveland, respectively. Ryan Lindley (Arizona), Nick Foles (Philadelphia) and Kirk Cousins (Washington, backing up Griffin) didn't win permanent starting gigs but also got playing time in 2012.

    After watching all of those gifted rookies shine – and, in several cases, lead their teams to quick turnarounds in the standings – Jets fans can't be blamed if they hope for a dose of the same medicine. Smith could provide it after an extremely prolific collegiate career at West Virginia that included nearly 12,000 passing yards and 98 touchdown tosses, but he's not specifically trying to follow in the footsteps of Luck, Wilson or any of last year's rookie stars.

    “Every situation is different and I’m pretty sure those guys wanted to do well just as I want to do well," he said, four days before his first NFL start. "They’ve all been faced with challenges and I expect the same. I’m just going to go out there and play football. I’m not worried about what anyone else did. I just take it play by play, day by day, and that’s kind of my motto. It’s something that I want to do and try to do every single time.”

    Smith was the 39th pick in the 2013 NFL Draft, somewhat surprisingly dropping to the second round, where he became too good for the Jets to pass up. New York had gone deep into the playoffs in each of Sanchez's first two seasons but had slipped to 8-8 in 2011 and 6-10 last year, with Sanchez seeing his passer rating drop to 66.9 in 2012. The two appeared to be in a fairly even battle for the starting job this summer, but the Jets hand may have been forced by a shoulder injury suffered by Sanchez late in the third preseason game. Either way, the job belongs to Smith now and he's pleased to have achieved that first important goal in his NFL career.

    “I’m extremely proud, but, at the same time, it’s something I’ve been working at – just preparing myself for this week," he said. "Got a big test coming up, a long season ahead of us, and I just want to continue to stay prepared. [It is] something I’ve been working extremely hard at. Still growing, still progressing as a player, and I want to get out there with a victory come Sunday.”

    To get that victory he'll have to overcome the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, who are visiting MetLife Stadium on Sunday. The Buccaneers faced two of last year's rookie passers, Griffin and Foles, and lost to both of them, but they are opening 2013 with a significantly revamped defense. After finishing the 2012 season first against the run but last against the pass, the Buccaneers signed All-Pro safety Dashon Goldson, traded for All-Pro cornerback Darrelle Revis and used their highest draft pick on award-winning cornerback Johnthan Banks. Smith has been studying the Bucs' defense and he knows some of the specific challenges it will present him in his first NFL start.

    “They’re stout against the run," he said. "They’ve improved their secondary from last year with the acquiring of Darrelle and the safety, Goldson, two of the best players at their positions in the NFL. But we've got to go out there and play ball. They have a very fast, undersized linebacking corps; they run sideline to sideline, they were number one against the rush last year. But none of that stuff takes us away from what we want to do here and that’s go out there and execute."

    Revis, of course, came to the Buccaneers from those very Jets, which means Smith has to face the player widely considered to be the NFL's best cornerback rather than have him at his back. Smith's coach, Rex Ryan, says the Jets still have their "Revis Rules" in place, and the rookie quarterback intends to keep them in mind.

    "We don’t like to pay attention to jersey numbers or who a guy is, but, at the same time, you've got to be mindful of it," said Smith. "So I’ll be watching for number 24 out there, Darrelle, [and] I’ll be watching for the safety. That’s something we do every single week, so it’s not like anything is changing, but you still have to mindful of those players because they are great players.

    “I’ve watched football and I know what [Revis] can do. He’s not a guy that you want to test. Plays are tight because he can make plays on the ball that your average DB can’t. He’s not a guy that you would really want to test, but, like I said, if a [receiver] is behind him or if he gets beat, then you got to deliver the ball no matter who it is. But I wouldn’t expect that from him because he’s such a great player.”

    It remains to be seen how much improved the Buccaneer defense will be with Revis, Goldson and some other new parts in place. Still, no matter who the Jets drew for their season opener, the rookie Smith was going to be facing a new level of competition as he makes the jump from the NCAA to the NFL. So far, he believes that transition has gone smoothly.

    “I wouldn’t say it was too difficult," said Smith. "There is a challenge there, but every single challenge that I’m faced with I’ll just take head on. That’s what I’ve tried to do with this thing. So far it’s been good to me. Like I said, I’ve been progressing, I’ve been steadily getting better, and I’m going to continue to grow and get better as a player. But to finally be named the starter – it means a lot to me to be a part of this organization, having teammates and coaches who have faith in me, and it also means that I got to go out there and produce and live up to what everyone expects of me. I look forward to it.”

    > http://www.buccaneers.com/news/artic...9-ac32fb1c66db

  2. #162
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    Running back Bilal Powell played sparingly as a fourth-round rookie out of Louisville two years ago before rushing for 437 yards on 110 carries (4.0 avg.) in 14 games last season.

    Now he’s entering the season as the No. 1 tailback on the team’s depth chart, and entering his third season as a pro, the 24-year-old could be ready to make the leap into one of the league’s top backs.“Bilal Powell has earned the right to start,” head coach Rex Ryan said Wednesday. “He did a tremendous job for us throughout training camp and in preseason games as well.”

    “I was just going with the ones and I guess somebody announced it and I never knew about it,” Powell said of being named the starter, “but it’s an honor. It’s always been a dream, but my biggest thing is just being able to go out and help this team win games and eventually get into the playoffs.”Marty Mornhinweg and the offense have a tough decision to make for this week’s game plan: run the ball against the best rush defense in the NFL, or pass the ball with a rookie QB against Darrelle Revis and a revamped Buccaneers secondary.

    Tampa Bay’s D held opponents to a league-low 3.5 yards per carry, so the top priority in Sunday’s game for Powell, Chris Ivory and Alex Green might not be running the ball but rather blocking for rookie quarterback Geno Smith in his first career NFL game and start.“I think the biggest thing is giving him time to go through his reads and make his throws,” Powell said of what he can do to help the second-round pick out of West Virginia. “He’s done a good job up to this point and we just want to protect him and take more pressure off him, allowing him to play loose.”

    In addition to blocking for Geno, Powell and his fellow backs might also help the QB out with their receiving skills out of the backfield. “It allows us to just give the quarterback another target out there,” Bilal said, who caught the ball 17 times for 140 yards (8.2 avg.) last season.Rex described this morning’s practice as “fast-paced,” which could prove to be very helpful in preparing for what Powell says is “a very fast defense.”

    “Our main goal is to stick to our game plan and go out and execute like we’ve been doing throughout practice,” No. 29 said. “Coach Mornhinweg and the offensive staff have done a tremendous job up to this point with the game plan. We feel very comfortable about it and we look forward to seeing it Sunday.”

    > http://www.newyorkjets.com/news/arti...9-debbe0a6ff67

  3. #163
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  4. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelly View Post
    Best against the run and last against the pass. I guess we are forced to pass. Geno will score a few TDs passing and maybe a few INT deep in their territory that doen't hurt us; just no pick 6s.

  5. #165
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    Truth & Rumors > NFL

    Jets to give Chris Ivory all goal line touches

    The New York Jets still aren't quite sure sure how they will use their running backs. Running backs coach Anthony Lynn said he wasn't sure what the breakdown of touches would be like, Lynn prefers to go with the hot hand. Ivory was considered the favorite to start but Bilal Powell won the job. However, fantasy owners need to be thrilled that Ivory will get the key touches inside the ten.

    > http://www.fannation.com/truth_and_r...ches?eref=sihp

  6. #166
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    It sounded like a plea from Marty Mornhinweg. A plea to the rest of the Jets to do their best to ease Geno Smith's transition to the NFL.

    "The other 10 players, as well as the special teams and defense, kick it up a notch," the Jets offensive coordinator said Thursday. "Really, that's an important part of the thing for a young quarterback that's inexperienced. It's just that simple. . The rest of the players jacking it up a notch is key."

    Certainly the rookie from West Virginia won't be asked to go it alone when he makes his first NFL start in the Jets' season opener against visiting Tampa Bay today. Still, the onus will fall squarely on Smith, who must take care of the ball and make sound decisions if the offense is to

    Mornhinweg said that in his experience, he has noticed there are two major philosophies in terms of defenses dealing with a rookie quarterback.

    Some defenses blitz often, or as Smith put it Wednesday, "try to rattle my cage."

    Others, as Mornhinweg noted, play soft, figuring an inexperienced signal-caller won't be able to string together enough positive plays to sustain a drive.

    "I would expect a little bit from each of those philosophies," Mornhinweg said, "but certainly it's in their system to blitz. Many of them are run-type blitzes, but still effective against pass protections as well. So [it's] a great opportunity [and] a challenge for our offensive line. And certainly [for] the tight ends and backs, even the receivers. [But] ultimately the quarterback is responsible for the blitz."

    Smith has seen plenty of extra pressure in practice, considering coach Rex Ryan is known for his myriad of blitz packages, and the frequency with which he uses them. Smith struggled at times with the pressure during practice, holding the ball too long. And one of his three interceptions against the Giants came when he was facing a fierce rush.

    So even though the Jets won't admit it for obvious reasons, they likely will simplify the game plan for Smith.

    "Certainly, schematically [with] the things going into the game plan," Mornhinweg said, "I may cross out a whole host of things as we get to Friday and Saturday depending on our conversations, what the film looks like, how Friday's practice looks and those sort of things."

    Mornhinweg expects Smith to play well.

    "The expectations are very high for that position, here," the coordinator said. "And so [Smith] knows what the expectations are. He expects himself to play well and certainly we do too. There's no question that we'll go through some ups and downs at that position, as we go here. One of the keys is, it's pretty easy when things are going pretty good, when you hit a dip, pounding through those hard times, is going to be just key."

    Mornhinweg was noncommittal about whether Smith and the offense might test ex-Jet superstar Darrelle Revis, who is coming off a devastating knee injury. But coach Rex Ryan was much more forthcoming.

    "I don't think that's going to be our philosophy," said Ryan, who praised Revis repeatedly during his tenure with the Jets, when he was a four-time Pro Bowler. "I can't even lie and say, 'Oh yeah, no, absolutely, we're attacking him, yeah.' I don't see that happening, but again, we'll see. Obviously, we know the kind of talent he is. All Jet fans know the kind of talent that he has."

    If Smith does throw the ball in Revis' direction, he'll have to pick his spots.

    "Most of these games are about yourself rather than the opponent," Mornhinweg said.

    And after this one, the Jets and Smith should know a lot more about themselves.

    BRIEFS: WR Santonio Holmes (foot) sat out practice Thursday, but Ryan said it was not a "setback," only a scheduled rest day. It still is unclear if he will play Sunday. . TE Kellen Winslow, battling chronic knee problems, returned to practice on a limited basis after resting Wednesday. . Revis has practiced fully for the Buccaneers each of the past two days.

    > http://www.mcall.com/sports/football...#ixzz2eIbRQae6

  7. #167
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    Arrow

    NY Jets Offense: Expect Lots Of Passes To RBs

    What should we expect to see on Sundays this year with new offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg calling the plays? One thing Marty's offenses have nearly always featured is a boatload of passes to the running backs. In the 13 seasons Marty Mornhinweg has served as a head coach or offensive coordinator in the NFL, his offenses have consistently favored the passing attack over running the ball. And when he has passed the ball, nearly every year a large number of those passes targeted running backs. Here are the numbers for Mornhinweg offenses through the years:

    Year

    RB Receptions

    RB % of Total Receptions

    San Francisco (OC)

    1997

    92

    33%

    1998

    92

    27%

    1999

    114

    35%

    2000

    106

    29%

    Detroit (HC)

    2001

    131

    38%

    2002

    107

    39%

    Philadelphia (OC)

    2006

    122

    38%

    2007

    110

    31%

    2008

    92

    25%

    2009

    80

    24%

    2010

    109

    31%

    2011

    55

    17%

    2012

    101

    28%

    Note that in only one year, 2011, did backs fail to catch at least 80 passes, and in 8 of the 13 years, backs caught more than 100 passes. These offenses featured great QBs (S. Young), good QBs (D. McNabb), OK QBs (J. Garcia) and terrible QBs (J. Harrington). They featured great WRs (J. Rice, T. Owens) and no name WRs. They featured great backs (B. Westbrook, L. McCoy) and no name backs. But the one constant has virtually always been that the backs catch a ton of footballs. The high point in this trend came in 2001 and 2002, when, not coincidentally, the Lions had a mediocre QB (Charlie Batch) and a terrible rookie QB (Joey Harrington) calling signals. With the rookie Harrington under center, running backs reached their high point in terms of % of the passing game flowing through them, as the Lions' backs accounted for a whopping 39% of all Detroit receptions in 2002.

    This suggests the Jets are likely to do something similar with rookie Geno Smith under center. This may be the main reason Bilal Powell is currently the first string RB, as Chris Ivory has no history of catching the ball and was injured so much of the preseason that he had little opportunity to prove to the coaches he was up to the task. It also suggests another reason why Geno Smith is far more suited for the starting job than Mark Sanchez, as Sanchez has proven to be possibly the worst QB in NFL history in throwing to his backs. So as you settle in for a new season of Jets football, expect to see a steady diet of throws to running backs this year. And when Mike Goodson arrives and works his way into shape, don't be surprised if he ends up seizing the first string RB job from Powell. Goodson is the Jets back best suited to the passing game, and if Mornhinweg's history is any indication, this may be a deciding factor in who sees the playing field the most. The last time Jets backs collectively caught as many as 90 passes was in the early years of Chad Pennington's career, in 2002, 2003 and 2004. Given Mornhinweg's history, it's likely we will be dusting off those RB pass plays more than at any time since those early Pennington years. The Jets passing game is about to take a short route, to the backs

    > http://www.ganggreennation.com/2013/...-passes-to-rbs

  8. #168
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    Stephen Hill Says Jets Receivers ‘Sent a Message’

    It’s fairly common to find head coach Rex Ryan in the national spotlight for his choice of words. Prior to Sunday’s season opener, however, he spoke loudly through his actions when he named wide receivers Santonio Holmes, Jeremy Kerley, Stephen Hill, Clyde Gates and Ryan Spadola, along with tight end Kellen Winslow, as our gameday captains against the Buccaneers.

    The decision to name these six men as his representatives in the opener was no coincidence.“The writers said that they were going to cancel Tone [Santonio Holmes] out and the receivers weren’t going to be a factor,” Hill said. “That’s the reason why. It meant a lot saying that he believes in his receivers, saying that you all are going to be the captains today, and you all are going to go out there and do your thing to help us get this win.”

    “Rex was just pretty much supporting us,” Spadola said, “and saying that if the media wants to go out and talk trash on our receivers and stuff, we want you guys going out there representing us today.”The receivers helped lead the way in our 18-17 victory over the Bucs. Hill caught a career-high six receptions, while Winslow, facing one of his former teams, hauled in seven passes for 79 yards and a touchdown.

    “It motivates me when guys think they’re better than me,” Winslow said about playing with a chip on his shoulder.Hill wasn’t angry when he heard some of the storylines circulating in media about QB Geno Smith’s lack of weapons, but he did feel disrespected.“I mean, we’re not just in the league for nothing,” Hill said. “We can make plays, we can do certain things, we play ball the same way as everybody else, so we just took it and moved on with it.”

    Being named captain came as a welcomed surprise for both Hill and Spadola, who just 11 days ago was not even sure if he would make the team as an undrafted rookie free agent.“Just to come out of the tunnel on Sunday afternoon and be among 53 guys who made the Jets team and to run onto the field in front of the best fans in the country is remarkable enough," the Howell, N.J., native said. "Then to be named a captain along with the other receivers and Kellen, it’s pretty indescribable, but a great feeling.”

    Spadola knows what it’s like to have the odds stacked against you, but the Lehigh product surprised many when he earned his roster spot this preseason, and he believes this group of receivers has what it takes to raise a few eyebrows of their own.“We know we’re a bunch of guys who are going to go out and probably shock the league this year,” he said.

    “I don’t want to say we got the laugh,” Hill said. “I want to talk about that after the season, when we’re probably one of those contenders to be in the playoffs. But we definitely sent a message. We sent a message to say we’re actually here, the receivers are here, this is a receiver offense, and we will make plays. Rex believes in us and we believe in him, so that’s a great thing.”

    > http://www.newyorkjets.com/news/arti...e-3d1cd5e4a3ed

  9. #169
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    A little more than a year ago, Kellen Winslow walked away from the Patriots, deciding a backup role with the squad didn't merit the strenuous work he put his body through.

    "It was just wrong timing. For me, it's a lot of hard work because of my knee. It wasn't worth it with me sitting," Winslow said about asking for his release from the Patriots last September. "So it was better for me to just chill out for a year, soak it in, and come back next year. I knew I'd be here." Kellen Winslow had seven catches for 79 yards for the Jets in Week 1.

    This Thursday, Winslow returns to Gillette Stadium, but he'll be wearing opponents' colors as he and the Jets face the Patriots. Winslow had an impressive debut with the Jets as he had a team-best seven catches for 79 yards and a touchdown in their 18-17 win over the Buccaneers last Sunday.

    "I really haven't done anything yet," Winslow said. "It's one game, and I have a long way to go."

    Winslow joined the Patriots after the Seahawks cut him for financial reasons at the end of the preseason last year, a move he's still upset with.

    "That's just the way they do things over there, I guess," Winslow said of the Seahawks. "I'm happy to be back."

    Winslow played in one game with the Patriots last season,catching one pass for 12 yards,butasked for his release due to theteam's massive array of offensive weapons. The 30-year-old, who battles with chronic pain in his surgically repaired right knee, didn't latch on with another team the rest of the year. The veteran said he has no regrets about leaving the Patriots, even though he'd likely be their starting tight end at the moment with starter Rob Gronkowski injured. He complimented the Patriots organization, calling them one of the smartest teams in the NFL.

    The Jets took a shot on Winslow by giving him a mini-camp tryout, and they saw enough to sign him to a deal. Sunday, the Jets received immediate dividends as Winslow played a huge role in helping the Jets win, as he had a critical 25-yard grab on the game-winning drive to go along with his touchdown.

    "Is he as good as he once was? Maybe not," Jets head coach Rex Ryan. "But he's still pretty darn good."

    Winslow was quick to downplay his strong effort in his first game, but he could be a nice security blanket for rookie Geno Smith. After last year proved to be a trying year, Winslow still believes he has plenty of good football ahead of him."It's expected from me. I just expect that from myself," Winslow said. "When it's clutch time and time to make a play that's what I live for. That's what it's all about. I don't want to let these guys down, and vice versa. That's what it's all about."

    CUMBERLAND UPDATE: Fellow tight end Jeff Cumberland (chin) said he's felling "pretty good" and will play Thursday. Cumberland said he cut his chin during the game when his teeth bit through his lip. He had to leave the game after receiving a big hit from Dashon Goldson, but returned.

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york/jet...ming-with-pats

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    – Santonio Holmes isn't known as a locker-room sage, but he dispensed sound advice Tuesday to Geno Smith over lunch in the team cafeteria.

    Discussing Thursday night's showdown against the New England Patriots, Holmes told the rookie quarterback to manage the game, use the clock wisely, and don't put the defense in bad situations.

    What Holmes was really saying was this: Don't be Mark Sanchez.

    For the first time since Nov. 13, 2008, when Brett Favre was at his gunslinging best and stole a game from Bill Belichick, the New York Jets will face the Patriots with a quarterback not named Sanchez. The Jets were 3-6 against their AFC East nemesis in the Sanchez era, with his turnovers looming large in many of those defeats.

    Now it's another fresh start, another quarterback to face Tom Brady. They've gone from Vinny Testaverde to Chad Pennington to Kellen Clemens to Favre to Sanchez to Smith, and Brady is still standing, flicking away the challengers.

    There's absolutely no way of knowing if Smith will have more staying power than his predecessors, but this game will be a fantastic test. He gets to face a Belichick-coached defense ... on the road ... in the Patriots' home opener ... in a short week. In terms of degree of difficulty, this is about as tough as it gets for an inexperienced quarterback.

    Last Sunday was a warm-up act. The kid held up reasonably well against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, benefiting from Lavonte David's greatest shove of all, a personal foul in the final seconds. Now it gets serious for Smith, who ventures into a stadium where Sanchez delivered one shining moment (the 2010 divisional playoffs) and a whole lot of heartbreak.

    "I embrace the challenge," Smith said. "I know Coach Belichick is one of the masterminds in this league. [I have] a ton of respect for him and his team. I expect everything, every single look. I'll appreciate it because it'll help me out in the future. ... I'm going to prepare myself for pretty much anything because that's what you can expect coming from that team."

    This is a house-money game for the Jets and, even though this may sound like heresy, it's possible to have a "good" loss if Smith plays well. This season is all about finding out if he's The Future, and it would be a tremendous step if he responds to the moment.

    Smith's fellow rookie, Buffalo Bills quarterback EJ Manuel, didn't implode against the Patriots. But he had the benefit of playing at home after a full week of preparation -- longer, really. Smith had one full practice, and that's a critical factor.

    Practice reps are huge for a young quarterback because he needs to be exposed to the defensive looks he's likely to see in the game. Smith said he went home after Sunday's win and immediately started studying tape of the Patriots. That's fine, but it can't replace actual field work.

    "This is the schedule we were handed," Smith said.

    His No. 1 priority is to protect the football, something the Jets rarely do when facing the Patriots. In the last four meetings -- all losses -- the Jets' turnover margin is minus-9, including the infamous Butt Fumble. The Patriots, frankly, don't scare anyone with their defensive prowess, but they have an uncanny ability to force turnovers -- a streak of 28 consecutive games with a takeaway.

    [+] EnlargeMark Sanchez and Geno Smith
    Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images
    Mark Sanchez was on the sideline while Geno Smith pulled out a Week 1 victory for the Jets.
    The Patriots aren't a heavy blitzing team -- Manuel was under pressure only six times -- but they can rattle a quarterback with clever pass coverages. In last season's Thanksgiving debacle, they baited Sanchez with a "trap" coverage, resulting in an interception. It wasn't entirely Sanchez's fault; there are plenty of seasoned quarterbacks who would've made the same throw.

    Belichick may decide to test Smith's patience, deploying a bend-but-don't-break defense -- figuring the rookie will end up breaking. The Patriots often took that approach with Sanchez. As a former Patriots assistant once said, "If he has the ball in his hands long enough, he's bound to screw up."

    Smith committed two turnovers against the Bucs, both his fault. You can beat an undisciplined team like the Bucs with two turnovers, but it would be hard to take down the Patriots on the road.

    "He ran well, he threw well, he made good decisions, moved the team at critical points in the game," Belichick said of Smith's NFL debut. "That's the most important thing -- he made the plays he needed to make to win."

    The Patriots have to be concerned with Smith's ability to improvise outside the pocket. He's no Colin Kaepernick, but he can escape the pocket if it breaks down, as he did on the game-deciding play against the Bucs.

    "He can create some plays on his own," Patriots defensive coordinator Matt Patricia said, "That adds an extra element to their system."

    Smith was 11 years old when Brady won his first Super Bowl, in February 2002, and grew up watching Brady, among others, wondering what it would be like to face him one day. That day is here. If Smith gets caught up in the hype, he'll fall apart on a national stage.

    Memo to Smith: Listen to Holmes. Don't be Tone deaf.

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york/jet...ez-vs-patriots

  11. #171
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    Takeaways on the news that New York Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez has a labral tear in his throwing shoulder and likely will have surgery at some point, as reported by ESPN senior NFL analyst Chris Mortensen :

    1. Turn out the lights: Sanchez's once-promising career with the Jets is effectively over. Even if he doesn't opt for immediate surgery, he'd be a candidate for injured reserve. He probably would have been released after the season anyway, but the injury all but cements it. He's signed through 2016, thanks to the three-year contract extension he received in March 2012; however, there's no guaranteed money left in the deal. New York can cut or trade him after the season with a minimal impact on the salary cap. He's due to count $13.1 million against the 2014 cap, but the Jets can reduce that figure by $8.3 million by unloading him before June 1. He's due to receive a $2 million roster bonus next offseason -- $2 million he'll never see.

    2. Shaky QB situation: Now we know why the Jets signed journeyman Brady Quinn. Even though they called it a day-to-day issue, the Jets absolutely knew Sanchez had suffered a significant injury. The organization's credibility takes a hit here. In terms of the actual impact on the team, the Jets will play the season with rookie Geno Smith, Matt Simms and Quinn. They have a combined total of five career wins as starting quarterbacks. Clearly, the Jets are building for the future, not 2013. They're committed to Smith for the season. Even if Sanchez returns, he'll ride the bench.

    3. What a shame: The organization should be embarrassed by the way it has treated Sanchez in recent weeks. Coach Rex Ryan made the irresponsible decision to insert Sanchez in the fourth quarter of a preseason game -- behind a bunch of scrubs on the offensive line. At that point, Sanchez was to be the opening-day starter. Ryan tried to rationalize the decision, saying he wanted to beat the Giants -- lame. To make it worse, owner Woody Johnson suggested recently that Sanchez should have protected himself on the play during which he was injured, intimating that the signal-caller was partially to blame. That's not how you treat players, especially a quarterback you're paying $8.25 million this season.

    4. Star-crossed career: Early in his career, Sanchez had it all. He was known as "Sanchize," a handsome young quarterback in New York with a bright future. He won four postseason games in his first two years, and there were more big wins on the way. The Jets' 30-year search for the next Joe Namath appeared to be over, but the good times faded quickly. The front office did a poor job of maintaining Sanchez's supporting cast, and his performance in 2011 and 2012 regressed significantly. The low point came last Thanksgiving, with the infamous "Butt Fumble." As Mortensen reported, Sanchez conceivably could try to rehabilitate the injury in hopes of returning this season, but for what? At this point, he needs to think of his career, not the franchise that will surely discard him after the season.

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york/jet...ny-appear-over

  12. #172
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    Our leading pass catcher in Sunday's season-opening victory was not a wide receiver. TE Kellen Winslow led the team with 79 yards through the air on seven receptions, including our first and only touchdown against Tampa Bay.
    During Tuesday midday’s practice, Winslow showed off his cat-like reflexes and unworldly athleticism when Smith threw a ball his way with some zip, several feet to Kellen’s left and just about a foot off the ground. Winslow immediately made a break, left his feet, dived full extension, and kept the ball from hitting the Atlantic Health Training Center’s grass.
    At 30 years old, the son of a Hall of Famer and the sixth-overall pick of the 2004 draft “still has great receiving skills,” head coach Rex Ryan said.
    “Is he as good as he once was? Maybe not,” Ryan said, recalling the nightmares he had as the Ravens defensive coordinator in trying to come up with an effective defensive scheme during Winslow’s years with the Browns. “But he’s pretty darn good.”
    For the second time in as many weeks, Kellen Winslow will go up against one of his former teams. Week 1 was the Buccaneers, for whom he had 12 receiving TDs in three seasons from 2009-11. Week 2 will be the New England Patriots, his team for one game last season before he asked to be released.
    He was stuck behind tight ends Rob Gronkowski and Aaron Hernandez on the depth chart, as well as losing targets to WR Wes Welker.
    “It was real good there, just wrong timing,” Winslow said of his short stay with Bill Belichick and Tom Brady. As a veteran who was rehabbing a knee injury in order to sit the bench, he felt it was better “to just chill out for a year, soak it in, and just come back next year.”
    While the Pats may have been the right team at the wrong time, the Jets appear to be the right team at the right time. Winslow's 47 offensive snaps were tied for the second-most among Green & White skill position players and his three receiving first downs led the Jets during Sunday’s season opener, and he displayed strong chemistry with his rookie quarterback.
    Kellen Winslow may not be the elite tight end that he used to be, but he showed Sunday that he can still be counted on to help lead the way when the game’s on the line.
    “When it’s clutch time and it’s time to make a play, that’s what I live for, man. That’s what it’s all about," he said. "I don’t want to let these guys down and vice versa.
    "I’m just being myself and trying to help the team. I’m just a piece to the puzzle.”
    Folk Earns League Award
    Nick Folk, who hit two go-ahead field goals in the final 5:05, including the 48-yarder for the win with 2 seconds to go, has been named this week's AFC Special Teams Player of the Week. Folk also had two touchbacks and two more kicks into the end zone on his four kickoffs before the game-ending squib kick.
    This is Folk's second AFC POW honor as a Jet. His first came after our Week 5 Monday night win over the Vikings in 2010, when he went 5-for-5 in his FG tries, one of them a 53-yarder.

    > http://www.newyorkjets.com/news/arti...d-26bcba2d0267

  13. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelly View Post
    Our leading pass catcher in Sunday's season-opening victory was not a wide receiver. TE Kellen Winslow led the team with 79 yards through the air on seven receptions, including our first and only touchdown against Tampa Bay.
    During Tuesday midday’s practice, Winslow showed off his cat-like reflexes and unworldly athleticism when Smith threw a ball his way with some zip, several feet to Kellen’s left and just about a foot off the ground. Winslow immediately made a break, left his feet, dived full extension, and kept the ball from hitting the Atlantic Health Training Center’s grass.
    At 30 years old, the son of a Hall of Famer and the sixth-overall pick of the 2004 draft “still has great receiving skills,” head coach Rex Ryan said.
    “Is he as good as he once was? Maybe not,” Ryan said, recalling the nightmares he had as the Ravens defensive coordinator in trying to come up with an effective defensive scheme during Winslow’s years with the Browns. “But he’s pretty darn good.”
    For the second time in as many weeks, Kellen Winslow will go up against one of his former teams. Week 1 was the Buccaneers, for whom he had 12 receiving TDs in three seasons from 2009-11. Week 2 will be the New England Patriots, his team for one game last season before he asked to be released.
    He was stuck behind tight ends Rob Gronkowski and Aaron Hernandez on the depth chart, as well as losing targets to WR Wes Welker.
    “It was real good there, just wrong timing,” Winslow said of his short stay with Bill Belichick and Tom Brady. As a veteran who was rehabbing a knee injury in order to sit the bench, he felt it was better “to just chill out for a year, soak it in, and just come back next year.”
    While the Pats may have been the right team at the wrong time, the Jets appear to be the right team at the right time. Winslow's 47 offensive snaps were tied for the second-most among Green & White skill position players and his three receiving first downs led the Jets during Sunday’s season opener, and he displayed strong chemistry with his rookie quarterback.
    Kellen Winslow may not be the elite tight end that he used to be, but he showed Sunday that he can still be counted on to help lead the way when the game’s on the line.
    “When it’s clutch time and it’s time to make a play, that’s what I live for, man. That’s what it’s all about," he said. "I don’t want to let these guys down and vice versa.
    "I’m just being myself and trying to help the team. I’m just a piece to the puzzle.”
    Folk Earns League Award

    Nick Folk, who hit two go-ahead field goals in the final 5:05, including the 48-yarder for the win with 2 seconds to go, has been named this week's AFC Special Teams Player of the Week. Folk also had two touchbacks and two more kicks into the end zone on his four kickoffs before the game-ending squib kick.
    This is Folk's second AFC POW honor as a Jet. His first came after our Week 5 Monday night win over the Vikings in 2010, when he went 5-for-5 in his FG tries, one of them a 53-yarder.

    > http://www.newyorkjets.com/news/arti...d-26bcba2d0267
    Geno should be able to build on that first game. I would get the ball early to Kellen Winslow and drive the Pats Defense crazy. I expect to see Geno spread the ball around like he did in game 1.

  14. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMJK View Post
    Geno should be able to build on that first game. I would get the ball early to Kellen Winslow and drive the Pats Defense crazy. I expect to see Geno spread the ball around like he did in game 1.
    so far...geno looks like a " keeper "

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    How Geno Smith Can Improve

    video -
    > http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=9668378

  16. #176
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    Another strong defensive effort was something for the Jets to hold onto Thursday night. The football was not. Inability to catch the ball — and it was dry the entire first half — is not something to let drop.

    The Patriots' offense is struggling. Unreasonable as it seemed to be able to beat Bill Belichick at Foxboro in a rookie quarterback’s second start, the game lay there for 60 minutes and the Jets repeatedly missed opportunities to seize it. It only would have taken 14 points to win the game.

    OFFENSE

    The Foot Fumble: As Aqib Talib wrestled Stephen Hill to the ground following a first-quarter catch, the defensive back’s foot flew up and dislodged the ball, which the Pats recovered. Not exactly what we usually are talking about when the kicking game makes a difference.

    Best Individual Effort: On third-and-short, Jets fullback Tommy Bohanon didn’t have it the first time, made it on a determined second push.

    Best Play: Geno Smith was on the money to Clyde Gates down the sideline in the third quarter for 34 yards to the New England 39. The drive fizzled, but Robert Malone’s punt to the 4 set up field position the Jets cashed for their touchdown on the following possession.

    Best Throw: Even with the above work of beauty, it probably was the one where Smith, on the run, came across his body low and away to Clyde Gates in the end zone. It was a throw impossible to cover, but replay determined the receiver didn’t control the ball all the way to the ground.

    Worst Throw: Smith underthrew Stephen Hill by 4 yards on Talib’s sealing reception.

    Second-Worst Decision: Nick Mangold hit Talib out of bounds on the runback — well, actually, it was kind of an extended celebration — and started a melee from which Willie Colon and D’Brickashaw Ferguson were thrown out of the game. The contest was over, sure, but this was unnecessary and dangerous.

    Worst Decision: On third-and-5 at the New England 27 early in the fourth quarter — and just after finding Hill for 37 — Smith threw a little behind Santonio Holmes into double coverage. The pass was tipped by Kyle Arrington and picked by Talib. Had the quarterback thrown it away, the Jets were in tying field goal range.

    Third-Worst Decision: Hill was wide open for a sure touchdown over the middle when Smith unsuccessfully went to the sideline and Santonio Holmes.

    When to Hold ‘Em, When to Fold ‘Em: Decisions by Smith were as much the story of the night as anything. Can’t just blame receivers inability to get open for four sacks — all apparently of the coverage variety. The kid has to learn to get rid of the ball.

    As Promising as It Gets When You Score Just 10 points, Drop the Ball All Night and Turn It Over Four Times: Vladimir Ducasse did a remarkable job on Vince Wilfork, including a burial on Bilal Powell’s touchdown run.

    Not a Good Mornhinweg: Powell scored easily, Chris Ivory spun for some tough yards, and the Jets averaged four yards per carry. So why didn’t they run more often?

    > http://www.newyorkjets.com/news/arti...1-5c0504a553b2

  17. #177
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    Case of the Fridays : Marty must adapt to help Geno

    Geno Smith needs to be better and the Jets need to find ways to make that happen, starting with offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg.

    Thursday night’s game was there for the taking. Between the Jets’ defense and the Pats’ offense, there were plenty of opportunities for Smith to lead the offense to a game-tying — if not game-winning — score.

    Instead, Smith saw his night end with a pair of interceptions and the Jets trekked back to New York without a win they could’ve had.

    Five days ago, Mornhinweg’s plan appeared deliberate and thought-out, mostly abandoning the run against a defense that swallowed running backs at the line of scrimmage. Thursday night, Mornhinweg had a running game that averaged 3.9 yards per carry and a quarterback that completed 48 percent of his passes. Yet he ran the ball 29 times and threw it 35.

    The Jets had a chance Thursday in part because Geno made plays that Mark Sanchez could not. He flashed the arm talent that had Smith atop draft boards last fall, particularly on deep throws to Stephen Hill and Clyde Gates. But that arm talent and those plays were overshadowed by a pass-heavy gameplan that begged for a Patriots interception. They got three.

    Geno was asked to throw his way to a win — on the road, against one of the league’s best opportunistic defenses, in the middle of a downpour. His wide receivers did him no favors, either. The Jets’ youth-filled, unproven bunch dropped catchable balls in key situations. I’m looking at you, David Gates. Or is it Clyde Clowney?

    Give Geno credit. He owned the mistakes in the postgame presser. He didn’t pass blame or use “we” in place of “I.” It didn’t sound like Sanchez’s classic “Yeah, I can’t do that there. I need to be better.” excuse train. Geno came across as a young quarterback taking responsibility for three drive-killing interceptions against a rival.

    “In this league … it’s about the turnover battle and I cost us the game,” Smith said.

    It’s hard to argue with him, but it could have been avoided. Chris Ivory showed life for the first time since arriving in New York and Bilal Powell was effective, if unspectacular. The run game wasn’t producing 25-yard jaunts, but it was effectively moving the ball and wearing down the Pats’ front seven.

    Despite this, it took Mornhinweg until the third quarter to make the run game a focal point, but even that barely lasted. He returned to his pass-happy ways with the Jets playing on a slick track and trailing by just three points in the fourth quarter. He can get away with this against the Bucs, a team far worse off than the Jets. Against the Patriots, and the upcoming October and early November slate, Mornhinweg needs a plan that limits Geno’s opportunities for mistakes but still gives him the chance to use his natural gifts.

    He also has to do this with a receiver corps unequipped for primetime. Hill, for one, is blessed with ability but cursed by inconsistency and even a dash of delusion. When asked about his multi-drop performance, Hill said “I thought I played a good game.” (Actual quote.)

    Those watching the game disagree, Stephen.

    It’s tough to blame Hill for his fumble, which came when an errant foot knocked the ball out, but Hill’s inability to secure the football won’t help Geno convert third downs or sustain drives through the season.

    Mornhinweg and Rex Ryan said before the regular season that Geno wouldn’t operate from a pared down playbook, but it’s time to revisit that idea.

    The Jets need to cut down the amount of reads Geno has to make on a given play. Implement more plays with three-step drops. Call for plays that get the ball out immediately instead of asking Geno to sit back in the pocket and find the open receiver. Smith has been sacked nine times through two games – a 72-sack pace over the season. That would be 21 more sacks than last year’s leader, Aaron Rodgers, and the most since David Carr was running for his life in Houston. As is the case with all rookies not named Andrew Luck, Geno needs to make quicker decisions.

    The Jets can scheme it so that he isn’t being asked to scan the entire field, which appears to take him roughly five to seven seconds – an impossible internal clock in the NFL.

    Mornhinweg also needs to commit to the run game or, at the very least, read the tea leaves better during the course of a game. Here’s a clue: If your big, bruising back is averaging 4.3 yards per carry in a one-score game, he should get the rock more than 12 times. In addition to wearing down the run stuffers, the Ivory-Powell combo can keep pass-rushers like Chandler Jones and Rob Ninkovich from teeing off as soon as the ball is snapped.

    This is not an unsolvable situation, nor is it as dire as some will paint it in the next 10 days. Rex’s defense is good enough to keep the Jets within reach in almost any game and the Mornhinweg-Geno combination is light years better than whichever quarterback was running Tony Sparano’s offense last season.But the Jets are also a Lavonte David brain lapse away from being 0-2 and they benefited from a Patriots offense that could barely run a preseason offensive scheme Thursday night. If the Jets want to remain competitive while continuing to develop Geno’s obvious strengths and weaknesses, Mornhinweg must adapt to make life easier for his quarterback.

    There is hope. The Jets just need to give it an opportunity to grow.

    > http://thejetsblog.com/nyjets/case-o...-to-help-geno/

  18. #178
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    There is plenty of simplicity in this O, RB will be crucial. Keep Geno healthy, no SB this year.

  19. #179
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    Quote Originally Posted by Apache 51 View Post
    There is plenty of simplicity in this O, RB will be crucial. Keep Geno healthy, no SB this year.
    agreed...it'll be at least 3 seasons before we even come close to a sb

  20. #180
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    Geno Smith held onto the ball way too long against the Pats.

    Some observations after reviewing the Jets' loss to the Patriots :

    Geno's hat trick: Rough night for Geno Smith, obviously. Let's take the interceptions one by one:

    1. This was the costliest interception because it came at the Patriots' 27; the Jets already were in range for a potential game-tying field goal. A few things went wrong. DE Chandler Jones beat LT D'Brickashaw Ferguson with an outside rush. Jones was behind Smith, still not close enough to sack him, but his presence influenced Smith, who escaped the pocket. This was a case of happy feet, as Smith still had time. Once flushed, he should've kept the ball; he could've beat DT Vince Wilfork to the corner. Smith spotted Santonio Holmes, who was open for a split-second. Smith tried to thread it through a few defenders, but the ball was behind Holmes and picked off by Aqib Talib. Bad decision, bad throw.

    2. Smith stared down Clyde Gates the entire play -- a rookie mistake. Gates had a step on his man, CB Alfonzo Dennard. Against a single-high safety, there was a window for Smith, but he telegraphed it and threw a split-second too late. Dennard made a nice play, jumping the route.

    3. This ended the game and precipitated the melee along the Patriots' sideline. Smith called this a "terrible" play on his part, but there may have been a miscommunication with WR Stephen Hill. Hill ran a 20-yard route and Smith threw it at 18 yards. This was a good play to run against a double-high safety look, but Smith and Hill didn't seem to be on the same page. Game over.
    Geno Smith

    2013 STATS
    Att73
    Comp39
    Yds470
    TD1
    Int4
    Rat55.2
    Four sacks allowed: Offensive linemen always get the blame for sacks, but sometimes it's not their fault. (Man, I sound like our old friend, Coach "Guge.") You could make a case that all four sacks allowed by the Jets fall into that category. Smith continued his tendency to hold the ball too long. The receivers also had trouble getting open against the Patriots' press coverage. Consider:

    1. Ferguson was beat on a wide rush by DE Michael Buchanan, but the play took 5.1 seconds, according to my stopwatch -- too long for a quarterback to hold the ball.

    2. LG Vladimir Ducasse was beat by Jones on a play that took 3.5 seconds. Hill beat his man on a slant, but the quarterback failed to pull the trigger.

    3. Jones was chipped by Holmes and beat Ferguson for the sack, but a lack of pocket presence was a contributing factor. Smith was all over the pocket and didn't see an open Holmes in the left flat. He held the ball for 4.1 seconds.

    4. RT Austin Howard got beat by an outside rush from DT Tommy Kelly (it's never good when a tackle lets a 310-pounder out-quick him), but Howard didn't get much help from Smith. RB Chris Ivory was open to the right, waving his arm, but Smith never saw him.

    A freebie for Brady: The Patriots' only touchdown came on a blown coverage. The Jets appeared confused by the Patriots' personnel package. On a third-and-2, they used three wide receivers and one tight end -- and the tight end was LT Nate Solder, who was identified as an eligible receiver. Tom Brady, perhaps sensing the Jets weren't lined up properly, took a quick snap and ran a hard play-action fake that sucked the defense to the line of scrimmage. WR Aaron Dobson, lined up in a tight wing, was uncovered for a 39-yard touchdown reception.It's possible that rookie CB Dee Milliner, who was lined up on the weak side, was supposed to be on the strong side, covering Dobson. Milliner didn't cover anyone and reacted quickly as soon as he saw Dobson with the ball, one of those "uh-oh, that's my man" reactions. If it was Milliner's mistake, it was one of several in the first half, resulting in his benching in the second half.Heating up Brady: Aside from the busted coverage, it's hard to quibble with the Jets' defensive performance. They frustrated Brady like we've never seen him. At one point, he was screaming at teammates on the sideline. Brady and his patchwork receiving corps were completely out of sync, but they managed to avoid interceptions. I'm surprised Rex Ryan didn't blitz more often, trying to pressure Brady into bad decisions. By my count, he sent more than four rushers on only 12 of 40 dropbacks.Ryan has shown in the past he can contain Brady with an emphasis on coverage, not pressure, but I thought he'd change it up because of the Patriots' lack of weapons. Again, the defense was fantastic, but it didn't create any game-changing plays. Considering the state of the offense, the Jets need their defense to create turnovers, shortening the field.

    Clearly, it was a late hit by C Nick Mangold, who could get fined, but it looked worse than it should've been because Talib was showboating and made like a ballet dancer, trying a spin as he went out of bounds. Patriots coach Bill Belichick was one of the instigators, as he got into Mangold's face. Ferguson received a mini-push from behind by Wilfork, and that set him off. Two officials tried to pull Ferguson away, and one -- head linesman Kent Payne -- lost his balance and fell on his rear end. Ferguson took a swing at Dennard, who was on the ground in the scrum. Ferguson was ejected for throwing a punch.LG Willie Colon, arriving on the scene, shoved referee Carl Cheffers, who lost his balance and nearly went down. You can't make contact with an official; that's a big no-no. He immediately threw his flag, resulting in Colon's ejection. A few seconds later, Colon did it again. He was being pushed away from the scene by back judge Todd Prukop and side judge Laird Hayes. Colon threw his arms up, making additional contact.Naturally, the league is reviewing the matter. Colon and Ferguson figure to be fined, and there could be suspensions as well. Colon would appear to be in the most danger of being suspended; it would be crushing for the Jets if Colon and Ferguson are suspended. An ejection doesn't automatically mean a suspension.

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york/jet...genos-mistakes

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