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Thread: Final Thoughts on The Jets Old Front Office

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    Final Thoughts on The Jets Old Front Office

    http://nyjetscap.com/2013_Articles/c...-thoughts.html

    Sar I, if you're listening you'll no doubt love the penultimate paragraph

    The Jets finished off the restructuring of the front office today when it became known that Assistant GM Scott Cohen and Director of Football Administrations Ari Nissim would not be retained moving forward. Along with former GM Mike Tannenbaum these three were likely the three most powerful men in the Jets organization and responsible for shaping the organization over the last few years. This pretty much finalizes the break from the last regime as the Jets move forward in a new front office and approach to the salary cap and the building of a team . With that in mind I wanted to go back and look over the run that this group has had.

    In many ways I’ll always feel a bit tied to this group. Tannenbaum was promoted to GM in 2006, Nissim was hired in 2007, and Cohen in 2008. 2008 was when I officially launched the nyjetscap website with planning beginning in 2007 so a lot of what I have discussed and learned about football has been observing and commenting on the decisions of these three. When I began the attempts to be an “amateur capologist” in 2007 I was pretty bad at it. If you go back and read some of my work from 2008 its really bad, but over time I got much better at the analytical side of it and really it was from getting a chance to watch from the outside as an organization was built from nothing into a contender before falling back down again.

    There was a time when Jets fans were hailing Tannenbaum as “the best GM in the NFL” as early as 2007 simply because the team shocked everyone by making the playoffs in 2006. Many of those same people are the ones who now say he didn’t belong running an NFL franchise. Whenever a group gets fired like this the immediate thoughts will always be failure because that is the most recent memory in everyone’s mind. But when you look back at the job that was done failure is not the word that comes to mind. Incomplete maybe, but not failure.

    I really thought the Jets turned a corner in 2010. I never bought into one title game making a difference (too many teams make 1 title game) but when they made it to a second one I felt the Jets had arrived. From a front office perspective the Jets, at that stage, were one of the best run organizations in football, in my opinion. They built the team the right way. There was never a quick fix that was going to occur so they turned to the draft in 2006 and 2007 to build a team with depth and what they felt were core building blocks of a team. The team carefully navigated the salary cap in 2007 planning for a run in 2008 when the young players were ready for the limelight and could see their performance improved with the addition of key veteran players. The Jets almost always moved on from players at the right time and brought in players when they could still contribute. It clearly worked as the Jets were arguably the best team in the NFL in 2008 before Brett Favre either got injured or stopped caring, and then in 2009 and 2010 the Jets were very close to making the Super Bowl. It was a good three year run.

    Were things perfect with the team? Obviously not. The Jets began to get a reputation for overpaying for free agent players, Alan Faneca and Bart Scott probably being the best two examples, but they mitigated those risks with contract structures. While the Jets ended up falling victim to the uncapped years accounting rules, they had brought Faneca in as a stabilizing presence between two young draft picks with every intention of walking away with minimal cap pain in 2010.

    Scott was brought in to change the culture of a team which he did before being one of the factors that saw it break apart. Twice the Jets re-worked Scott’s contract to be team friendly, once just months after he signed it and again in 2011 when they got Scott to agree to a paycut provided he received guaranteed salary. At the time most casual observers and statistical tracking sites claimed Scott was one of the best performing interior linebackers in the NFL. Nobody will give them credit for the move but that was as proactive a move as you could find.

    Some of the contracts that the Jets signed were very unique and in many cases team friendly. I was always so impressed with what the Jets did with Mark Sanchez in 2009. It was a contract designed to get all the pain out of the way early to the point where if he failed the cost to release him was minimal. Contrast that with the contract for Matt Stafford who is a cap killer for the Lions and even is he busted would have been impossible to move away from. The Jets didn’t fall into the trap of the 5th or 6th year “salary cap void” for their rookies opting instead for things like franchise tag provisions that gave the team more time to decide on their course of action with the player.

    The team negotiated their fair share of great contracts and took their chances on high upside low cost players via trades. D’Brickashaw Ferguson took a contract that was so low in real guarantees as well as dead money that it was arguably one of the best deals in the NFL for a high level player. The Jets made moves to bring in players like Santonio Holmes, Braylon Edwards, and Antonio Cromartie on low cost contracts where the expected performance was going to exceed the cap charges for the players. From a budgeting standpoint on a win now team it helped mask the failures of the 2008-2010 drafts in the short term.
    The Jets were, at times, tough negotiators. Clearly the drama with Darrelle Revis has been well documented since day 1. The Jets overpaid Revis as a rookie for the ability to have him at a reasonable rate in the 4th and 5th years of his rookie deal. Of course that led to a Revis holdout where the Jets wisely stood firm before the head coach forced their hand and led to a compromise of sorts. It still ended up being a good contract for the Jets despite the high payouts. Why would I say that? When you have big name media folks in both the NY market and nationally out there complaining that Revis is underpaid, you know those words are coming from inside Revis’ camp. If they are complaining just two years in it means the team got a good deal.

    Rightly or wrongly the Jets negotiated salaries downward for many mid tier starters such as Mike DeVito and Matt Slauson. This past year a similar strategy was used for Holmes. These are moves that are planned years in advance when signing players to contracts that contained escalator clauses which had no guarantees attached to them. It didn’t always work, players like Faneca and Thomas Jones resisted, but the Jets made sure to make it known that if you didn’t play ball you were not playing ball with the Jets. It’s a cold business but these are the moves that teams make thinking they can win a title.

    The front office was always big believers in building the team chemistry through the offseason programs and the Jets compensated their players with workout payments more than almost any other team in the NFL. It was a strategy that promoted incredibly high participation rates from their entire squad. In the later years the Jets began to build more holdout protection into their contracts by including reporting bonuses towards the end of the contract terms to ensure a player had a financial incentive to report to camp and not try to hold out.

    I’m sure that the guys would like to have a mulligan on a few moves. Speaking strictly from a contract standpoint the Jets probably went overboard on the guaranteed money. Would David Harris have really had options outside of the team at this kind of pay? Doubtful. Would Holmes have had those kind of guarantees from any other team? Doubtful.

    They also seemed to fall into the trap at the end of being a champion for an idea rather than objectively analyzing the idea. While they were forceful with players who were relatively under the radar guys like DeVito they did not take the same approach with players who were significantly worse such as Eric Smith and Wayne Hunter. Those were players who should have been on veteran minimum contracts in 2012 but the Jets refused to budge and I have to think that in part was from the excessive criticism those two players received for being on the wrong end of far too many SportsCenter highlights.

    Of course the biggest disaster was the extension of Sanchez, which undid almost all of the good they gained when they negotiated his rookie contract. In some ways I understand what they were doing. The Jets saw that there was a QB market growing at a ridiculous rate that was going to see Joe Flacco earn upwards of $20 million a season. To lock up your QB for under $14 million a season is smart cap management. The problem is that it was just misguided judgment as to what Sanchez was. Sanchez wasn’t Eli Manning. Sanchez was Joey Harrington. It was a terrible judgment call. Now its not Sanchez’ cap hits that have sunk the Jets but the dead money that hangs over their head if they cut him this year.

    I think one of the biggest misconceptions of the Tannenbaum era is going to be the thought that the Jets were in “cap hell” and that the salary cap destroyed the team. “Cap hell” is a situation where the cap dictates the moves that your franchise is forced to make. It’s a situation where you cant sign free agents because of the cap. It’s a situation where you are forced to cut productive players you want to keep because of the salary cap. In general you cant compete because of the salary cap.

    I think I can safely make the leap of faith that outside of those within the organization itself I probably have as deep an understanding of the Jets cap the last few years as anyone. I saw the phrase “cap hell” first pop up in 2007 which was part of the reason why I began the website as I wanted to see if things were really that bad with the team. It wasn’t the case then but it was being reported as such. Its one of the problems with people getting a cap sheet with no context to the cap sheet and just reporting a number. One of the goals of my websites is to explain what those cap sheets mean, even if my sources aren’t as good or the numbers not perfect.

    In 2009 Mike Lombardi, now General Manager of the Cleveland Browns, began a campaign over at National Football Post basically lambasting the Jets for being in such a bad cap situation, reporting that the team was $30 million over the cap due to the spending of the year before. In that case he didn’t even have the right numbers, but just the lack of context from someone who worked in a front office was pretty bad. This carried over to Pro Football Talk and the Jets cap became the talk of the town. The Jets were never in cap hell nor were they ever $30 million over the cap. The Jets had two high priced cap charges on the books that year, one was Kerry Rhodes and the other Calvin Pace, due to high roster bonuses that were designed to be converted to prorated bonuses. At the end of the day the Jets had enough money to make Bart Scott the highest paid ILB in the NFL and not cut anyone of merit.

    In 2012 we had the same talk about “cap hell” and how the cap was keeping the Jets from signing more players. It was never the case. The Jets flirted with Peyton Manning in the offseason. The cap was never an issue, it was the talent pool available for the team. This past season we have heard nothing but talk of cap hell and how it was the 2nd worst in the NFL (the Raiders being the worst). Why? Because Jason Smith had a huge cap hit with no dead money? Because Bart Scott had a high cap charge with minimal dead money? The fact was the Jets ended up around $17 million under the salary cap with almost no dead money on the books. It wasn’t painful. I outlined ways for the Jets to get to $30 million under the cap with no issues. They didn’t go there but they could have. Next year the team will likely end up with over $30 million in cap space.

    The fact is the Jets could have kept Revis and LaRon Landry and Dustin Keller if they wanted to. They chose not to. Since 2007 no matter how many times people have said the Jets lost a player due to cap I cant recall any player that was cut for anything besides play on the field. Most of the players the Jets lost this year cant find a job. That has been the case for years. The only player who the Jets downgraded via trade/cut was Rhodes, who simply did not get along with the head coach. For the most part the Jets effectively allocated their cap dollars among the team often using the renegotiation process to bring higher cap deals back down to levels that came closer to matching the on field production.

    Salary cap has never been a real problem for the Jets. Never have they fallen into the trap that the Cowboys fall into where they are loading deals with voidable years to keep a team together. Other than the Revis deal they have never gone that route and his situation was unique. They have never used exotic NLTBEs to avoid cap charges in the present and damage the future. The Jets have always kept the books flexible to work within the framework of the current contracts and not significantly damaging their future. In the 7 years since 2006 ended the Jets have been big spenders in 3 years and only in 3 years would I say the Jets held cautious on spending.
    What sunk the Jets was the poor drafting from 2008 thru 2010. For whatever reason that has often been overlooked this year in lieu of the salary cap discussions. If the Jets had found a way to move up in 2008 and grab Matt Ryan rather than standing firm and getting Vernon Gholston we wouldn’t even be talking about this today. Too many poor decisions which led to the Jets being too filled with downtrending veterans with nobody to pick up the slack. You can only mask the problems with free agency for so long and for the Jets the clock struck 12 somewhere halfway thru the 2011 season.

    Looking from the outside there were philosophical changes that seemed to begin in 2011 and really peaked in 2012. I tend to think that was tied to Rex Ryan’s upbeat personality taking the organization over but it was at that time where the Jets started to break away from what got them to the dance and instead chasing dreams and overguaranteeing dollars to players who may not have deserved it. They went from risk averse to very risky and in this case almost no risks worked out.

    But, at the end of the day, we got a competitive team that nearly made a Super Bowl and for a little while became the talk of the NFL world. They were always in a position to have money at their disposal and improve the team through a variety of means. Other than the bookend seasons of 2007 and 2012 there was never a time when this team was not competitive and they should have made the playoffs from 2008 thru 2011 if they were a mentally tougher team in December. Who know where we will be 5 or 6 years from now, but I do know if John Idzik, Rod Graves, and whomever else they bring in have the same success as Tannebaum, Cohen, and Nissim they will be hailed as the greatest thing since Joe Namath and as soon as it goes down will be vilified as they are shown the door.

  2. #2
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    Good article. Some red meat for everyone in there, especially those of us who like to bash the media. Although I would argue the "cap hell" situation. Maybe we weren't in "cap hell" but we were in a pretty bad spot. We haven't signed an upper-level FA in a few years and the cap was one of the issues in the Revis trade. So that is up for debate. Next year we will have plenty of flexibility so hopefully the draft picks pan out and we can sprinkle in some solid FAs.

    As for the penultimate paragraph, only an idiot would deny Rex's influence over the FO since he got here. Luckily, we have a new sheriff in town and he is now picking his own people
    Last edited by DDNYjets; 05-18-2013 at 08:16 AM.

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    I can't read something that long, but I read enough to agree with the 'not a failure' and 'incomplete' points.

    When they made it to the ACFCG I felt they could be a team to be reckoned with in the years to come. With a repeat appearance I was convinced.

    If the front office was responsible for putting a team together to achieve that, then failure is not the right word to quantify that regime.

    All my opinion of course.

    Good Job dude.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tedtedthefootballhead View Post
    I can't read something that long, but I read enough to agree with the 'not a failure' and 'incomplete' points.

    When they made it to the ACFCG I felt they could be a team to be reckoned with in the years to come. With a repeat appearance I was convinced.

    If the front office was responsible for putting a team together to achieve that, then failure is not the right word to quantify that regime.

    All my opinion of course.

    Good Job dude.
    Great read as always Jason.

    That's it in a nutshell Ted. They put together a good team that convinced almost all of us that we had arrived. The trouble was they didn't have a viable plan to maintain the high level that the team had reached.

    EDIT: An afterthought... Jason mentioned that the recent poor drafting played a large part in the fall of the Tanny FO. To take that a bit further, I (along with many others) have felt that Tanny was too quick to trade away draft choices. This was at least partially responsible for the lack of depth suffered by the team. Additionally, with fewer selections, it becomes imperative to hit on every one. With more picks you can afford to miss on a few, while the effect of draft misses are only multiplied by having fewer selections. That is what happened to the Jets.
    Last edited by Jet Blast; 05-18-2013 at 10:29 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Blast View Post
    Great read as always Jason.

    That's it in a nutshell Ted. They put together a good team that convinced almost all of us that we had arrived. The trouble was they didn't have a viable plan to maintain the high level that the team had reached.

    EDIT: An afterthought... Jason mentioned that the recent poor drafting played a large part in the fall of the Tanny FO. To take that a bit further, I (along with many others) have felt that Tanny was too quick to trade away draft choices. This was at least partially responsible for the lack of depth suffered by the team. Additionally, with fewer selections, it becomes imperative to hit on every one. With more picks you can afford to miss on a few, while the effect of draft misses are only multiplied by having fewer selections. That is what happened to the Jets.
    I think the argument against Tannenbaum an trading picks is overplayed.

    He made moves because he and the coaching staff thought the Jets were close with the roster and wanted talent over quantity.

    Remember, draft picks were used to get guys like Jenkins, Edwards, Holmes, Cromartie, moving up in the draft for Sanchez, Greene, Keller, all players that were added to be the key players/core of the team.

    The problem is, when a team uses draft picks, and they flourish, the players have to be paid. It's not so much that the Jets gave away draft picks and didn't replenish the depth on the team, there are plenty of ways to do that, it's that the Jets had to make decisions with players like Cotchery, B Smith, eventually Edwards. Players like Jenkins got hurt and the team was never able to get a full return on the investment they made on the player.

    I think in the last two years, with the Jets having to eventually pay back those draft picks, Tannenbaum shifted his approach, and avoided trading away picks, this past year was one of the first years in a while the Jets had all of its picks, and I believe the plan all along was to go for it last year, but then begin retooling through draft starting this year.

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    please re-edit the OP and have everyone click the link. Jason is probably the best Jets writer out there at least give him some traffic.

    Just my 2 cents.

    Carry on.

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    Amazeballz article - I love u Tanny!

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    Awesome read. Great post. My biggest beef with Tannenbaum was his philosophy of trading up and trading pics away. We have away many precious pics. The Sanchez extension sealed his fate.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

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    Tanny committed career suicide the minute he traded for Tebow. He lost the 2012 season and he lost all credibility he ever had.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Danza View Post
    please re-edit the OP and have everyone click the link. Jason is probably the best Jets writer out there at least give him some traffic.

    Just my 2 cents.

    Carry on.
    Hm. Damned if you do and damned if you don't

    I think I'll stand pat on this one. None the less you make an excellent point about Jason and his web site. There are any number of insightful articles posted there and anyone not familiar with the site should definitely have a look see.

    PS: his what if comment re moving up for Ryan instead of standing pat with Gholston actually sent a chill thru me....ah...if only.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by LIJetsFan View Post
    http://nyjetscap.com/2013_Articles/c...-thoughts.html

    Sar I,WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS

    This is how I saw the OP's post as. Almost put me to


    And I second the motion to just post the friggin' Link and have people click it instead of posting the entire article.

  12. #12
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    The 4 biggest things I belive led to Tanny's demise:

    1) Trading up was good and bad for the team. We got good players out of those trades normally, but at the price of being able to add suitable depth

    2) Sanchez extension - It just didn't make any sense. I do not know what Tanny was watching to be convinced that he needed to resign Sanchez after the 2011 season. I believe everything pointed to Sanchez turning out to be a terrible QB. He obviously felt quite differently

    3) Tim Tebow - it's the ultimate sin to have him as your backup QB. He provided absolutely NO competition for Sanchez and deprived us of a suitable "go to" option in the event that Sanchez needed to be replaced.

    4) Bad drafts - Like the OP states, 2008 through 2010 really killed this team. They had no suitable replacements for anyone leaving the team. Damien Woody was a very good player and we are still searching for guy even close to what Woody was. Faneca was cut and we had nobody that could provide the kind fo fire Faneca was capable of delivering when the playoffs began. LT and Tony Richardson retired and we were never proactive in attempting to regain the kind of talent we had in them. The only attempt I can see in all of those players was Vlad Ducasse to replace Woody at RT. Ducasse absolutely sucks. It was a bad idea for Tanny to gamble on a project in the 2nd round. As I recall, there were many more suitable players on the board that could have provided an immediate impact.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vin View Post
    This is how I saw the OP's post as. Almost put me to


    And I second the motion to just post the friggin' Link and have people click it instead of posting the entire article.
    If you can't read through an article this length that say more about you than anyone else really. Jason is one of the best writers to cover our team and for every one poster like you that says just put up a link, ten others would rip the OP if he DIDN'T post the article. Can't win.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vin View Post
    This is how I saw the OP's post as. Almost put me to


    And I second the motion to just post the friggin' Link and have people click it instead of posting the entire article.
    Pretty douchy comment.

    If you see a lot of words, or big words, you could just skip the thread.

    Better than clicking on a link and then when seeing, ugh words...without pictures, then getting your panties twisted.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Nut View Post
    Pretty douchy comment.

    If you see a lot of words, or big words, you could just skip the thread.

    Better than clicking on a link and then when seeing, ugh words...without pictures, then getting your panties twisted.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheMo View Post
    If you can't read through an article this length that say more about you than anyone else really. Jason is one of the best writers to cover our team and for every one poster like you that says just put up a link, ten others would rip the OP if he DIDN'T post the article. Can't win.
    I don't really care if he's the greatest writer in the whole friggin' world.

    Normally, when you post a link to an article, you would put down either an excerpt or SHORT summary of what is discussed. Then if others are interested enough, they can click on the link to read the entire article. It's that simple.

    However, what the OP is basically doing is shoving the article down our throats and not giving any choice of whether or not we want to read it. It's almost like a "look at me!"(or rather "look at my article") sort of thing.


    But I digress, since you two think I was being douchey about it, I will stop discussing it. Carry on.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vin View Post
    I don't really care if he's the greatest writer in the whole friggin' world.

    Normally, when you post a link to an article, you would put down either an excerpt or SHORT summary of what is discussed. Then if others are interested enough, they can click on the link to read the entire article. It's that simple.

    However, what the OP is basically doing is shoving the article down our throats and not giving any choice of whether or not we want to read it. It's almost like a "look at me!"(or rather "look at my article") sort of thing.


    But I digress, since you two think I was being douchey about it, I will stop discussing it. Carry on.....
    Hey, all I was doing was trying to breath some life back into the forum. For the past few days we've IMHO been stuck on some same old topics. I found the article a bit long but well worth the read. Sorry if you didn't.

    I guess I could have cropped it a bit. It really wasn't a hey look at me or look at my article so much as hey let's try to move on to something else.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LIJetsFan View Post
    Hey, all I was doing was trying to breath some life back into the forum. For the past few days we've IMHO been stuck on some same old topics. I found the article a bit long but well worth the read. Sorry if you didn't.

    I guess I could have cropped it a bit. It really wasn't a hey look at me or look at my article so much as hey let's try to move on to something else.
    No worries, man. Glad you explained your reasons as I now fully understand what you were trying to do.

    It has definitely been a bit slow around here with the only news being Goodson possibly FUBAR'ing.......

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vin View Post
    No worries, man. Glad you explained your reasons as I now fully understand what you were trying to do.

    It has definitely been a bit slow around here with the only news being Goodson possibly FUBAR'ing.......
    Good, now that we've got your blessings on the OP's posts, do you actually have something substantial to add? Or are these too many words for you as well? Some of us don't mind the reading, especially since it's voluntary...meaning there's no reason to post three times in a thread you don't appreciate.

    ======================================

    Awesome post by Jason as always, and great job by the OP for posting the full article.

    Tanny and Rex were my favorite parts of this organization at one point. As Jason said, there were great at structuring contracts, had some very good drafts, and made some great low-risk/high-reward trades. There were very few moves that I didn't understand, even if I disagreed with them. The Sanchez extension was a calculated risk which I can't blame Tanny for...it's not his fault Mark regressed so thoroughly...till that point, he had actually been progressing; however slowly, in his first three years in the league. However, his two biggest 'blemishes' (the only two moves I was completely mystified by) was when they let Braylon go and instead signed Santonio, and trading for Tebow. To me, that was enough to bring someone new in.

    It's not fair to place all of the blame of 2012 on Tanny and Co especially considering that from '08-'11, at one point or another, we were up there with some of the best in the league. However, a change needed to be made, if only because after so long, change can bring about progress.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by greenwichjetfan View Post
    Good, now that we've got your blessings on the OP's posts, do you actually have something substantial to add?
    yes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by greenwichjetfan View Post
    Good, now that we've got your blessings on the OP's posts, do you actually have something substantial to add? Or are these too many words for you as well? Some of us don't mind the reading, especially since it's voluntary...meaning there's no reason to post three times in a thread you don't appreciate.

    ======================================

    Awesome post by Jason as always, and great job by the OP for posting the full article.

    Tanny and Rex were my favorite parts of this organization at one point. As Jason said, there were great at structuring contracts, had some very good drafts, and made some great low-risk/high-reward trades. There were very few moves that I didn't understand, even if I disagreed with them. The Sanchez extension was a calculated risk which I can't blame Tanny for...it's not his fault Mark regressed so thoroughly...till that point, he had actually been progressing; however slowly, in his first three years in the league. However, his two biggest 'blemishes' (the only two moves I was completely mystified by) was when they let Braylon go and instead signed Santonio, and trading for Tebow. To me, that was enough to bring someone new in.

    It's not fair to place all of the blame of 2012 on Tanny and Co especially considering that from '08-'11, at one point or another, we were up there with some of the best in the league. However, a change needed to be made, if only because after so long, change can bring about progress.
    I recall having the exact opposite reaction to the extension. I think most posters on most forums I read did too. As I recall, MS screwed up the 2011 season when with 3 games to go and still in the playoff hunt, his wheels just fell off. Blame Holmes, blame Shotty, blame whoever, but MS imploded when everyone expected him to come through for us.

    I agree though, up to then, Tanny/Rex had been almost flawless. I'm amazed at how quickly TANNY lost his way.

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