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Thread: Tesla Aims To Avoid Traditional Car Dealerships, but The Govt. Won't Let Them

  1. #1

    Tesla Aims To Avoid Traditional Car Dealerships, but The Govt. Won't Let Them

    http://money.cnn.com/2013/05/20/auto...html?hpt=hp_t3

    On this issue, I side with Tesla 100%. A perfect example of the Government getting in the way in order to prop up special interests and politically influential contributing friends.

  2. #2
    A company should be able to sell and distribute as it sees fit.
    As long as service and repair centers are available, I think Tesla is fine.
    The only drawback is if they go under. So it's a buyer beware. But then again, Suzuki just withdrew from the US. Who handles Yugos? Renault. Citroen?
    Direct sales to the consumer are fine. Avon. Tupperware. A myriad of products.

  3. #3
    Jets Insider VIP
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    yet another segment of the economy pops up to demand protectionism and its stranglehold on the consumer.

  4. #4
    STATE RIGHTS STATE RIGHTS!!!!!

  5. #5
    Free market Republicans in North Carolina seem to be leading the fight to restrict competition. You can't buy one in Texas, Republican Texas.

    Dam what happened to the Republican party. Who would have thought they would be for restricting markets and Union style protection.

    Next thing you know they're going to want a luxury tax on Tesla and tax free status for Chevy and Ford.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Winstonbiggs View Post
    Free market Republicans in North Carolina seem to be leading the fight to restrict competition. You can't buy one in Texas, Republican Texas.

    Dam what happened to the Republican party. Who would have thought they would be for restricting markets and Union style protection.

    Next thing you know they're going to want a luxury tax on Tesla and tax free status for Chevy and Ford.
    And it says that where in the article?

    What happened to you? You used to have reasoned arguments; now you sound like busterbot, craphead, or one of the new leftist loons on here.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by quantum View Post
    And it says that where in the article?

    What happened to you? You used to have reasoned arguments; now you sound like busterbot, craphead, or one of the new leftist loons on here.
    You're serious? Read all of the current articles about this subject.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Winstonbiggs View Post
    Free market Republicans in North Carolina seem to be leading the fight to restrict competition. You can't buy one in Texas, Republican Texas.

    Dam what happened to the Republican party. Who would have thought they would be for restricting markets and Union style protection.

    Next thing you know they're going to want a luxury tax on Tesla and tax free status for Chevy and Ford.
    Wow, I missed the part in the article where the free market Republicans were leading any fights. As I read in the North Carolina Auto Dealers Association were trying to block them. Do you have information that the NCADA is a Republican free market group?

    I for one side with Tesla on this one. They should be allowed to sell their product however they see fit.

  9. #9
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    Ridiculous.

    Not to stray too far, but have you guys noticed what Tesla's stock has done this year? Staggering. Hope you got in

  10. #10
    While i believe Tesla should be able to sell it's cars directly to the consumer, i do not believe they should be allowed to monopolize the repairs.

    This isn't just a Tesla thing, but an issue with licensing with all auto brands. It's currently considered an infringement of copy-write to type the password into your automobiles internal computer unless you've been authorized by the manufacturer.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by JetPotato View Post
    Ridiculous.

    Not to stray too far, but have you guys noticed what Tesla's stock has done this year? Staggering. Hope you got in
    Unreal.

    Bubble?

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by chiefst2000 View Post
    Wow, I missed the part in the article where the free market Republicans were leading any fights. As I read in the North Carolina Auto Dealers Association were trying to block them. Do you have information that the NCADA is a Republican free market group?

    I for one side with Tesla on this one. They should be allowed to sell their product however they see fit.
    The bill was introduced in the NC Senate by North Carolina Republican Tom Apodaca and passed the Senate. The Senate is about 66% Republican. The Auto Dealers can't get legislation onto the docket without Republicans supporting it.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Winstonbiggs View Post
    The bill was introduced in the NC Senate by North Carolina Republican Tom Apodaca and passed the Senate. The Senate is about 66% Republican. The Auto Dealers can't get legislation onto the docket without Republicans supporting it.
    It sucks but local politicians will always support local associations over outside influences because of the votes and cash those associations deliver. Dirty side of politics. Still this is far from a small government free market position. The TEA Party there should take up the issue and try to influence the local Pols to block that legislation.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Axil View Post
    While i believe Tesla should be able to sell it's cars directly to the consumer, i do not believe they should be allowed to monopolize the repairs.

    This isn't just a Tesla thing, but an issue with licensing with all auto brands. It's currently considered an infringement of copy-write to type the password into your automobiles internal computer unless you've been authorized by the manufacturer.
    1) The term is copyright

    2) No, no it isn't. A password is not copyrightable. It may be unauthorized access to a protected computer under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, but I doubt that would stand, either.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by doggin94it View Post
    1) The term is copyright

    2) No, no it isn't. A password is not copyrightable. It may be unauthorized access to a protected computer under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, but I doubt that would stand, either.
    True but a manufacturer can void a warranty based on screwing with the computer system. Can't make it illegal but they can punish you for doing it.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by chiefst2000 View Post
    It sucks but local politicians will always support local associations over outside influences because of the votes and cash those associations deliver. Dirty side of politics. Still this is far from a small government free market position. The TEA Party there should take up the issue and try to influence the local Pols to block that legislation.
    The vote was 100% so even though the bill was introduced and passed by Republicans apparently the Dems who are in the legislature were just as easy to purchase.

    It does suck. These artificial barriers to entering markets is one of the biggest reasons corporations have a huge incentive to donate money to established politicians at both the State and Federal level.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by doggin94it View Post
    1) The term is copyright

    2) No, no it isn't. A password is not copyrightable. It may be unauthorized access to a protected computer under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, but I doubt that would stand, either.
    1.) of course you are correct.

    2.) These are my sources:

    (a) http://www.wired.com/opinion/2013/03...-or-your-cars/
    (b)http://www.thevoicereport.com/2008-01-03/BlackBox

    *edit* Looks like the second link is for a telecom company. I believe i came across a simaler issue regarding passwords to automobile internal computers somewhere in my travels. I'll post that one as well if i come across it again.
    Last edited by Axil; 05-21-2013 at 01:41 PM.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Axil View Post
    1.) of course you are correct.

    2.) These are my sources:

    (a) http://www.wired.com/opinion/2013/03...-or-your-cars/
    (b)http://www.thevoicereport.com/2008-01-03/BlackBox

    *edit* Looks like the second link is for a telecom company. I believe i came across a simaler issue regarding passwords to automobile internal computers somewhere in my travels. I'll post that one as well if i come across it again.
    Both are about cell phones. In any event, take it from a copyright lawyer - it's not a copyright violation. It may be an issue of circumventing an access control, but not from the copyright statute, not for cars (that's certain), since a car's engine cannot be copyrighted.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by doggin94it View Post
    ....since a car's engine cannot be copyrighted.
    It can be patented.

    And as Chief pointed out, whilst the manufacturer cannot limit people from fiddling with it's product post-sale, it most certainly can void any and all warranties if the buyer chooses to do so.

    The legal question of interest is the requirement to provide the owner with the passwords/access codes to his own vehicle post-purchase.

    As I see it, when you own the asset, you own all of it, including it's computers. Access codes should be provided. It's a nasty legal loophole that allows sales of an asset, but not the power to actually operate/utilize that asset without even further required spending (not just in the auto industry either).

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