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Thread: The Prison Industrial Complex

  1. #1

    The Prison Industrial Complex

    June 9, 2013 - Conspiracy, Featured, Main
    Tagged: cca, crony capitalism, government, journalism, police state, wall street - 3 comments
    Only the most vile, degenerate and immoral person could feel good about the practice of for profit institutionalized slavery which dominated the southern economy for 300 years. What is even more unacceptable is that people who knew better, presumably Christian people with a conscience did little or nothing while evil was triumphing.

    Today, America is witnessing the rebirth of institutionalized slavery within its borders and it is indeed a predominantly racist practice with Latinos and Blacks comprising the bulk of the new slaves. And we are also witnessing racist rates of incarceration within our juvenile justice system. This outrageous practice should be decried by every media outlet in the country, but this problem is all but ignored by the mainstream media (MSM). Why? Because the MSM is making money off of this unholy practice.

    A Growing Customer Base

    There are over two million inmates in American prisons, or one in 743 people. Communist China, which has five times the population of the United States, has 500,000 less inmates. The United States has only 5% of the world’s population, but has 25% of the world’s prison population.

    In 1972, the U.S. had less than 300,000 inmates. By 1990, the incarceration rate had skyrocketed to one million and by today, the rate has more than doubled again. Again, I ask why? Because there is very big monied interests behind the growth industry of privatized prisons.

    According to Charles Campbell, author of The Intolerable Hulks (2001), the privatization of the prisons movement has its origins in the Revolutionary War period. England began to put undesirables and prisoners in prison ships. The U.S. fully embraced the use of private prisons during the Reconstruction Period (1865-1876) in the south, following the Civil War. Plantation owners and business owners needed “free” replacements to compensate for the loss of their previous slave laborers. In 1868, convict leases were awarded to private business interests in order to bolster their labor workforce and the practice continued until the early 20th century.

    Today, this practice has been taken over by private corporate interests who are increasingly taking over our prison system and this unholy practice is no less exploitative than the slave labor abuses of the past and as in all forms of slavery, it is being fueled by profit.

    Prison for Profit
    The Corrections Corporation of America is the largest private prison operator in the United States. The CCA procured its first private prison in, ironically, 1984.

    Did you know that in many states, privatized prisons are guaranteed 90% occupancy rates by the government?

    According to the California Prison Focus “The private contracting of prisoners for work fosters incentives to lock people up. Prisons depend on this income. Corporate stockholders who make money off prisoners’ work lobby for longer sentences, in order to expand their workforce. The system feeds itself,” says a study by the Progressive Labor Party, which accuses the prison industry of being “an imitation of Nazi Germany with respect to forced slave labor and concentration camps.”

    The Impetus Behind the Prison Industrial Complex

    According to public analysis from the Security and Exchange Commission (SEC), the largest holder in Corrections Corporation of America is Vanguard Group Incorporated. Vanguard is a major player in controlling several media giants. Vanguard is the third largest holder in Viacom and AOL Time Warner. Vanguard is also the third largest holder in the GEO Group. The GEO group, second only in size to the CCA with regard to privatized prisons as it controls over 100 correctional facilities in the US, UK, Australia and South Africa. In addition to CCA’s unwarranted control over the media, the number-one holder of both Viacom and Time Warner is a company called Blackrock. Blackrock is the second largest holder in CCA, and the sixth largest holder in the GEO Group in this never-ending incestuous relationship.

    The conclusion is inescapable. The people who control privatized prisons in the United States are also heavily vested in the media. This is why you don’t hear about the Prison Industrial Complex in the media and the installation of institutionalized slavery in our privatized prisons goes largely unreported in the media.

    Vanguard Windsor II Investment Fund owns CCA. However, CCA is a minute part of the Vanguard Windsor II Funds. Vanguard Windsor is also invested in corporate giants like JP Morgan, IBM Pfizer and Conoco. This accounts for the Wall Street backing of privatized prisons and the subsequent lobbying for longer and stricter prison sentences which fuels this growth industry.

    This makes the privatized prison industry a Wall Street backed growth opportunity.

    The Prison Industrial Complex is an impressive growth industry which is fueled by its Wall Street investors and leads to greatly overcrowded and inhumane prisons.

    According to the Left Business Observer, the highly privatized federal prison industry produces “100% of all military helmets, ammunition belts, bullet-proof vests, ID tags, shirts, pants, tents, bags, and canteens. Thus, we see a partial marriage between private prisons and our government’s wars of occupation. Namely, prison slave labor is being used to produce the weapons and supplies of war.

    America has found and antidote to the loss of manufacturing through the various free trade agreements (i.e. NAFTA, CAFTA). Unfortunately, prison slave labor is the solution. The Left Business Observer identifies private corporate interests benefiting from prison slave labor which includes the manufacturing of “93% of all paints and paintbrushes; 92% of stove assembly; 46% of body armor; 36% of home appliances; 30% of headphones/microphones/speakers; and 21% of office furniture.”

    Go to School and End Up In Prison
    There are almost 75,000 juveniles in prison and the rates are skyrocketing because of a phenomenon that is now being referred to as the school to prison pipeline in which schools are increasingly refusing to deal with even minor discipline issues and are placing juveniles in police custody.

    In 2010, there were 5,574 school-based arrests of juveniles in the Chicago Public School. The juvenile arrests accounted for about one of every five juvenile arrests in the entire city of Chicago for all of 2010. The incarceration rates for Chicago’s juveniles are in line with most other metropolitan areas in the country. There is also a general trend of disproportionate rates of minority contact within the juvenile justice system, Black youth accounted for 74% of school-based arrests, and 22.5% of youth arrested were Latino. The enrollment of Chicago schools in was 45% Black and 41% Latino. These high arrest rates for so many of our minority youth, create potential slave laborers for the Prison Industrial Complex. Once a child is adjudicated in the justice system, society usually witnesses a straight line right to prison. These precious children are having their futures robbed from them before they can even get started. What are they being arrested for? The number one reason is fighting on school grounds.

    As a child, I had fights on school grounds, but nobody tried to send me to prison. The number two reason why children end up in the justice system is for possessing small amounts of marijuana.

    As a former mental health counselor, I am all too familiar with the devastation brought on by use of drugs. However, marijuana is not one of these drugs. If legalizing marijuana runs against everything you believe in, how about decriminalizing. In other words, we still make the drug illegal but nobody goes to prison for simple possession.

    The federal authorities, controlled by the corporations will never allow such a common sense, liberalized approach to drug enforcement. The feds even arrest medical marijuana dispensers and users. Why? Because Wall Street wants prisoners to fill its increasingly privatized and for-profit prison system. This is the major reason why America has 25% of the world’s prison population.

    Our minority youth, in the inner cities, are being conditioned by the system that going to prison is part of the life experience. And with extremely high recidivism rates, prison slave labor will never have any shortage of participants.

    The Prison Industrial Complex and their lobbyists are responsible for zero tolerance policies, mandatory sentencing and the three strikes life sentencing that is so prominent in many of our states and unless we identify these abuses and stop them, it is only going to get worse.

    These events are culminating to establish was has been dubbed as the School to Prison Pipeline

    Increasingly, the youth of America are the main participants and as a result slavery has reared its ugly head in the modern era and it is racist and exploits many of our youth for profit. And that is the topic of Part two of the Prison Industrial Complex.
    http://www.thecommonsenseshow.com/20...trial-complex/

  2. #2
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    Articles like this cheapen the definition of "slavery" and betray the people that had to endure such things. I think we should sentence murderers and rapists to hard labor. But I would not call what is detailed in this article "hard labor".

    As for the judicial system being racist I think that more crime occurs in the inner cities and police are sent to the areas where the crime rates are the highest. Just so happens that most of the inhabitants of the high-crime areas are minorities.

    The system is far from perfect. It is broken in some areas but it does not change the statistics. I do not think minorities are not being exploited to fuel our wars. IMO that is too big of a leap to make.

    As for the juveniles, I do think it is bad to send kids to jail for fighting. That needs to stop (unless we are talking gang fights). It is bad for kids and bad for taxpayers. However, the marijuana debate is a legitimate one b.c it is still against federal law. And the article fails to note the link between marijuana, gangs and guns.

    The biggest challenge minority children face is the overwhelming amount of them that come from single-parent households. This is especially true for blacks. The latest data I came across states that in Illinois (since the article used Chicago) a whopping 74% of African-American children come from single-parent homes. The national average is 67%.

    http://datacenter.kidscount.org/data...s.aspx?ind=107

  3. #3
    Legalize Pot.

    Decriminalize simpel drug possession (convert to medical issue).

    Throw the book at violent criminals of all kinds, gun wielding criminals especially, and gun wielding drug-related violent criminals most of all.

    And start demanding actual accountabillity from ALL communities instead of endless blame deflection and welfare handouts to perenial crim-infested communities.

    Prison problem solved.

  4. #4
    You mean to say that Wall Street profiting off of this is not criminal? The inmates make less than people that sneaker companies hire in other nations.

    It really is slavery

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Jetdawgg View Post
    You mean to say that Wall Street profiting off of this is not criminal? The inmates make less than people that sneaker companies hire in other nations.

    It really is slavery
    No, it's punishment for crimes committed.

    I simply prefer to see a more rational, reasonable group of perpetrators being punished, harder, for their crimes, and some not punished at all.

    Take that how you will.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Churchill View Post
    No, it's punishment for crimes committed.

    I simply prefer to see a more rational, reasonable group of perpetrators being punished, harder, for their crimes, and some not punished at all.

    Take that how you will.
    Yes. If anything they are earning their keep. How much does it cost to incarcerate these people? We are not talking about hard labor, which I would be in favor of for the more perverse criminals.

    But I do think the situation with juveniles needs to be looked into. If they are being jailed for simple scuffles then I think that is excessive. But I do know that violence is a major issue in Chicago school so maybe we are talking about something worse than a typical scuffle between two hormonal teens.

  7. #7
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    Even easier solution to the OPs dilemma is to eliminate the privatization of prisons. Of course, that would result in a whole other problem, one that likely lead to the discussion and subsequent privatization in the first place.

    As for those numbers, I'd really like some independent verification of them. I mean, 90%+ of paint brushes? Is Purdy or Wooster owned by one of those companies?

    Punishment, by its very definition, should be somewhat, for lack of a better word, cruel. It's the dosing of that with a level of civil rights where it gets to be tricky. Fact is, most inmates are happy to have a job whilst incarcerated, even for a few dollars a day. It keeps them out of trouble, out of the housing areas and gives the a semblance of freedom that they wouldn't experience otherwise in a dorm/cell.

  8. #8
    ummmmmm....these folks are criminals AMIRITE?

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by FF2® View Post
    ummmmmm....these folks are criminals AMIRITE?

    Could this be systemic?

    http://www.opposingviews.com/i/socie...on-being-built

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Churchill View Post
    Legalize Pot.

    Decriminalize simpel drug possession (convert to medical issue).

    Throw the book at violent criminals of all kinds, gun wielding criminals especially, and gun wielding drug-related violent criminals most of all.

    And start demanding actual accountabillity from ALL communities instead of endless blame deflection and welfare handouts to perenial crim-infested communities.

    Prison problem solved.
    +1

  11. #11
    I once sold a piece of machinery to a Texas prison system. The machine was 500 ton heating press designed to mold military helmets like the one in the OP's photo. I still have a few of the samples here in my office. I think it is wonderful that the Prison system has jobs for the inmates. It helps offset the cost of imprisoning them and also teaches them a trade they may use later in life.

    I think we can all come together in this forum and agree that the OP's gripes with giving prisoners jobs, and refering to it as modern slavery, is the stuff of kooks and loons. There is a point to be made however. As a country we need to increase incarceration times for violent criminals and decrease the prison time for non violent offenders. I don't want a spot in jail being taken up by a drug user when a rapist or armed robbery type gets out in a couple of years. In Vermont they refuse to imprison child rapists because the leftists there think it's not that big of a deal or its curable with therapy. In Connecticut two criminals with long rap sheets of armed robberies and assaaults get let out of jail after having their sentenced reduced and promptly enter a house, rape the mother and children and proceed to burn them alive. Repeat offenders are the main driver of crime in our country.

  12. #12
    Go to jail. Earn your keep.
    The question is: Does CCA run a prison more efficiently than the corresponding government entity? If so, good concept.
    BTW, CCA is a virtual non entity. They have annual revenue of about $1.8 bill. (Looked it up). There are numerous companies that do that every WEEK.
    Hardly a Wall Street bonanza.

  13. #13
    We have mandatory sentences for minor crimes that give prosecutors almost unlimited power. The largest prison population in the world and we even count the prisoners as voters who can't vote and give their jailors extra representation both locally and federally.

    The head of NSA lies to the Congressional intelligence committee and people are calling for the head of a whistle blower. No problem get naked and you have nothing to hide.

  14. #14
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    Here's a NY Times piece that at least outlines some of the reasons for the high rate of incarceration... it's not Wall Street...seems, as others have said, that we really need to examine what we put people in prison for and how long...

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/23/wo...anted=all&_r=0

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by chiefst2000 View Post
    In Vermont they refuse to imprison child rapists because the leftists there think it's not that big of a deal or its curable with therapy.
    Link?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by long island leprechaun View Post
    Here's a NY Times piece that at least outlines some of the reasons for the high rate of incarceration... it's not Wall Street...seems, as others have said, that we really need to examine what we put people in prison for and how long...

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/23/wo...anted=all&_r=0
    We probably have the most effective law enforcement in the world. We catch our criminals. That might be part of the reason why we have so many people behind bars. Also, in this country we are born with many freedoms. And bc of that people feel like they can get away with things. Human nature.

    As for sentences, that is a matter of opinion. Like the article states, most people are in favor of longer sentences for criminals.

    It is the drug war that needs to be fixed. I do not think legalization is the answer. Even though we will save some money, I think that will have a negative impact on society.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by FF2® View Post
    Link?
    here is one link I found doing a quick google search:

    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,181498,00.html

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by FF2® View Post
    Link?
    State Laws Are Strangely Soft When It Comes to Sex Offenders

    According to a report conducted by The Washington State Institute for Public Policy, “The average length of stay in prison is 60 months for offenders convicted of sex crimes against adults, 44 months for offenders convicted of sex crimes against children, and 33 months for all other sex offenders.” Offenders who committed sex crimes against children spent LESS time in jail? How is that possible?

    Washington isn’t the only state with light punishments for sex offences. The Cabin, an independent news source reported that last year, “Christopher Scott Barr, 33, of Vilonia stood before Judge David Reynolds last month after pleading guilty to sexual assault in the second degree and received 60 months of probation.” The hearing took place in the state of Arkansas, and as you can see, even though the sex offender plead guilty, he never had to serve any jail time. Barr isn’t the only sex offender avoiding the slammer, USA Today reported that Richard W. Thompson, a 50 year-old-sex offender was convicted of TWO felony sexual assault charges against a 12 year-old-girl and got off on probation! The reporter writes, “Though he could have been sentenced to 10 years behind bars, he ended up with 10 years of probation instead.”

    Lenient state laws frequently allow convicted sex offenders to walk on probation, or serve minimal jail time. This means that your neighborhood could literally be saturated with sex offenders, and you’d never even know it.



    http://blog.instantcheckmate.com/sex...ort-sentences/
    Last edited by chiefst2000; 06-11-2013 at 01:15 PM.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by chiefst2000 View Post
    State Laws Are Strangely Soft When It Comes to Sex Offenders

    According to a report conducted by The Washington State Institute for Public Policy, “The average length of stay in prison is 60 months for offenders convicted of sex crimes against adults, 44 months for offenders convicted of sex crimes against children, and 33 months for all other sex offenders.” Offenders who committed sex crimes against children spent LESS time in jail? How is that possible?

    Washington isn’t the only state with light punishments for sex offences. The Cabin, an independent news source reported that last year, “Christopher Scott Barr, 33, of Vilonia stood before Judge David Reynolds last month after pleading guilty to sexual assault in the second degree and received 60 months of probation.” The hearing took place in the state of Arkansas, and as you can see, even though the sex offender plead guilty, he never had to serve any jail time. Barr isn’t the only sex offender avoiding the slammer, USA Today reported that Richard W. Thompson, a 50 year-old-sex offender was convicted of TWO felony sexual assault charges against a 12 year-old-girl and got off on probation! The reporter writes, “Though he could have been sentenced to 10 years behind bars, he ended up with 10 years of probation instead.”

    Lenient state laws frequently allow convicted sex offenders to walk on probation, or serve minimal jail time. This means that your neighborhood could literally be saturated with sex offenders, and you’d never even know it.



    http://blog.instantcheckmate.com/sex...ort-sentences/
    Thats not even about Vermont.

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by chiefst2000 View Post
    here is one link I found doing a quick google search:

    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,181498,00.html
    You said "In Vermont they refuse to imprison child rapists"

    That's one story about ses offender who was imprisoned.

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