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Thread: Patriots* Aaron Hernandez questioned then charged with murder. MERGED

  1. #441
    Quote Originally Posted by Tucker134 View Post
    Agreed. From a news perspective, this is a tragedy- a 27yr old man was murdered, and the focus should be on catching the perps.

    As a football story, this hurts the Patriots, and that's a good thing. Just being honest...and I'm sure I am not the only one who feels this way here.
    I think it's two separate stories. They're connected, but separate. I'm sure friends and family of the victim don't care about football. Well, friends besides Hernandez and the other two guys.

    One thing I'm curious about, if Hernandez is NOT considered a suspect as in many of these reports, who is?

  2. #442
    Looks like the Pat's need another tight end, probably never going to see Hernandez in a Pat's uniform ever again.The thug didn't want to leave the hood behind him and now he is going to pay a price for wanting to play in two different worlds. Too bad, he was a talented player, but clearly he is a POS and always will be.

  3. #443
    So now you see EVERYTHING has come full circle.

    He lawyered up because he was GUILTY of something and he knew it.

    Once again, for the cheap seats to hear...

    People who lawyer up only INVITE more scrutiny by the cops. If he had just told them what they wanted to know, and if he was in fact NOT GUILTY, the truth would have come out and everything would have been over by now.

    But instead, just like all you f*cking legal scholars, he lawyered up. All that did was make the cops KNOW they were on the right track.

    But go ahead and live in you dumb a$$ world of paranoia, and think that everyone is out to get you.

    But I've got news for you. If you are innocent and you stay away from trouble? NO ONE, including the cops would ever think you are important enough to go after.

  4. #444
    Quote Originally Posted by Fishooked View Post
    Confirms my suspicions when the story first broke the other night. No way would the police search is home without a warrant. With Hernandez involved, this case instantly becomes very high profile (remember the mistakes made during other high profile cases that led to acquittals). Could explain why SI continues to say he is not a suspect despite law enforcement's actions centering around Hernandez.

  5. #445
    Quote Originally Posted by ARodFLKeysJetsFan View Post
    Even though he is not officially named as a suspect yet, obviously the police know Hernandez is involved - otherwise, they would not have obtained a search warrant to search his house.

    I think it's only a matter of time before Hernandez is charged. What he is actually going to be charged with remains to be seen.
    Exactly, I was being facetious. I want to know, if he's not considered a suspect, then who is? All these media folks who initially insisted Hernandez was having a "bad" day never stopped to think or ask WHO is a suspect if not Hernandez.

    At this point, he's in a really bad spot, whether he did it or not.

  6. #446
    One could surmise at this point that they need to figure WHO actually committed the murder. Just because Hernandez was driving does not make him the guy that killed Lloyd. Further forensic testing I'm sure will expose each and every persons role in that car.

    I believe that is the hold up. That is why Hernandez has not been charged as of yet. The cops want to get their ducks in a row before apprehending Hernandez.

  7. #447
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    Not sure if this has been posted but I found this piece about the victim. RIP



    http://sports.yahoo.com/news/nfl--od...012700036.html

    Odin Lloyd, victim in murder probe involving Aaron Hernandez, paid his way to play football

    Odin Lloyd lived on the opposite end of the football world. Aaron Hernandez, the New England Patriots tight end who was questioned after Lloyd's death near his home in Massachusetts, knew the bright lights and big money of the NFL. Lloyd was a semi-pro linebacker who paid for the right to tackle.

    "It's a tremendous cross-section of people," says Tom Torrisi, the CEO of the 20-year-old New England Football League where Lloyd played. "Firefighters, dentists, accountants. These guys play for the love of the game and for the actual physical contact."

    Lloyd, who was 27, joined the Boston Bandits with a group of friends from the John O'Bryant School of Math and Science in Roxbury in 2007, and together they formed the spine of the team. A former O'Bryant coach also works as an assistant for the Bandits.

    "He was a very personable player, always in a good mood," says Olivier Bustin, the team's head coach. "Never had a problem with him. Liked by teammates. A very good athlete."

    Bustin said he got no sense of anything amiss when he last saw Lloyd, at a scrimmage on Saturday. He said Lloyd played "great" that day, though he left his helmet behind. The last correspondence from the man they called ‘O' was about the forgotten helmet, which Lloyd had to buy himself.
    On Tuesday, Bustin got a text from another coach: "Did you hear what happened to Odin?"

    Lloyd was found dead in North Attleborough, a mile from the upscale neighborhood where Hernandez lives. Police came to Hernandez's house on Tuesday and left with a box, but it's not known if the NFL star was in any way involved in Lloyd's death. A report out of WBZ-TV in Boston indicated that Lloyd was dating the sister of Hernandez's girlfriend. Lloyd lived in his uncle's home in Dorchester, which is roughly 35 miles from where his body was found.

    The state medical examiner has ruled Lloyd's death a homicide, according to the Associated Press.

    The Bandits went ahead with their practice on Tuesday.
    "Some of the guys didn't know [what happened to Lloyd]," said Bustin. "We tried to get everybody on the same page. Odin played football and that's what we're going to do. Odin wouldn't want us not to practice. So we had our regular practice."

    The league is close-knit, with about 2,000 players ranging in age from 22 to 36. Some are hoping for a chance to catch on in the Arena Football League, but most play for the camaraderie and exercise. Although the Bandits are considered "semi-pro," players pay $100 or more for equipment, which is sometimes defrayed by sponsorships from local businesses. The teams play mostly on high school fields from July until September.

    "Things are hunky dory, well and good, and this ruins everything," says Torrisi. "The sting is devastating. This isn't the NFL; we're not equipped for this."

    The Bandits have been hit by an inordinate amount of tragedy for a tiny team, according to its website. Derrick Rucker died in an electrical fire in 2002 and left behind a young daughter. Four years later, a Bandits rookie named Jeff Ibenewenka was murdered in Hyde Park, also leaving a daughter. Lineman Jason Mitchell died in 2008, two years after retiring from the Bandits. BJ Smith died in his sleep in 2009 at age 34, leaving behind a wife and two children. Cedric Warren was killed in a car accident last year. He also had a daughter.

    Lloyd's team will play its season opener next week against Brockton, and it plans to honor the late linebacker.

  8. #448
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainejet View Post
    So now you see EVERYTHING has come full circle.

    He lawyered up because he was GUILTY of something and he knew it.

    Once again, for the cheap seats to hear...

    People who lawyer up only INVITE more scrutiny by the cops. If he had just told them what they wanted to know, and if he was in fact NOT GUILTY, the truth would have come out and everything would have been over by now.

    But instead, just like all you f*cking legal scholars, he lawyered up. All that did was make the cops KNOW they were on the right track.

    But go ahead and live in you dumb a$$ world of paranoia, and think that everyone is out to get you.

    But I've got news for you. If you are innocent and you stay away from trouble? NO ONE, including the cops would ever think you are important enough to go after.
    First of all, I think that it is likely he was "involved" in the crime. Does that mean that he shot the guy? Did one of his friends shoot the guy and did Hernandez help cover up the crime?

    Second, getting lawyered up does not mean anyone is guilty. While cops are generally honest, they do make mistakes from time to time.
    - Richard Jewell was a hero, but the FBI got it in their head that he was the Olympic Park Bomber. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Jewell
    - Because of good lawyering, Dallas Cowboys players Michael Irvin and Erik Williams were able to establish that a rape alllegation against them was false.
    http://lubbockonline.com/news/011597/polic1e.htm

    Bottom Line: if you are the target of a police investigation, you should lawyer up even if you are innocent. If you are guilty, you really need to lawyer up.

  9. #449
    Quote Originally Posted by Digetydog View Post
    First of all, I think that it is likely he was "involved" in the crime. Does that mean that he shot the guy? Did one of his friends shoot the guy and did Hernandez help cover up the crime?

    Second, getting lawyered up does not mean anyone is guilty. While cops are generally honest, they do make mistakes from time to time.
    - Richard Jewell was a hero, but the FBI got it in their head that he was the Olympic Park Bomber. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Jewell
    - Because of good lawyering, Dallas Cowboys players Michael Irvin and Erik Williams were able to establish that a rape alllegation against them was false.
    http://lubbockonline.com/news/011597/polic1e.htm

    Bottom Line: if you are the target of a police investigation, you should lawyer up even if you are innocent. If you are guilty, you really need to lawyer up.
    And were ANY of these people CHARGED with a crime, tried for the crime? let alone convicted of the crime.

    WTF do you get this sense that LAWYERS got these people off? Please show where it says that.

    You advocate lawyering up because you want attention. Maybe you in some strange way, actually enjoys attention whether it be good or bad?

    Once again, my statement holds true..

    INNOCENT PEOPLE HAVE NOTHING TO HIDE

  10. #450
    Quote Originally Posted by Mainejet View Post
    And were ANY of these people CHARGED with a crime, tried for the crime? let alone convicted of the crime.

    WTF do you get this sense that LAWYERS got these people off? Please show where it says that.

    You advocate lawyering up because you want attention. Maybe you in some strange way, actually enjoys attention whether it be good or bad?

    Once again, my statement holds true..

    INNOCENT PEOPLE HAVE NOTHING TO HIDE
    You're right, Maine, innocent people have nothing to hide, but to be honest - having an attorney to consult isn't a bad idea. The legal system is not cut and dry, and if someone is close to a crime, but innocent, it's in that person's best interest to seek counsel in order to protect himself.

    I'm not saying that I believe Hernandez is in the clear, I'm just saying it's not a bad idea to consult with your attorney. If the police knocked on my door and asked me about a murder a mile away about someone that I have never met or known or heard of, and I had nothing to do with it - well, yes, I'm not speaking with my attorney. If I knew the guy, he was in my house the night before, I drove him around, and I hung around with 2 other people and the four of us went out and 3 of us came back, and I had nothing to do with it......well.....in that improbable instance I'd lawyer up.

    Hernandez has a world of legal trouble ahead of him. He may know, but not be involved. If that's true, at the very least he can get hit with obstruction at this point.

  11. #451
    As the saying goes, "he who represents himself has a fool for a client."

    Any individual who tries to discharge a legal matter on their own is just, let me be candid, STUPID!!

    I am a lawyer in a global law firm -- government regulatory practice. For example, If, god forbid, I was alleged to commit a DWI I certainly would not represent myself as that is not my specialty. Laws change from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Furthermore, since I do not specialize in criminal law, I would be an idiot to try and defend myself. As the saying goes, "a lawyer who represents himself has a fool for a client."

  12. #452
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainejet View Post


    INNOCENT PEOPLE HAVE NOTHING TO HIDE
    An extremely popular position in just about every totalitarian regime in the world, past or present.

    The Gestapo, NKVD, KGB, Stasi and all of such like thinkers loved it.

    Thankfully, we have this Constitution thing to protect citizens from their Government. It applies in all 50 states, even Maine and even protects those evil democrats and lawyers you so obviously despise.

  13. #453
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    Quote Originally Posted by brady's a catcher View Post
    You can take the punk outta the hood....
    Prior to the 2010 NFL draft, it was widely known that Aaron Hernandez had failed drug tests while at the University of Florida. That was apparently not the only reason the Patriots tight end fell to the fourth round. Some of Hernandez’s associates in his hometown of Bristol, Conn., were involved in gang activity, according to Sports Illustrated. Multiple NFL personnel sources and a law enforcement official told SI about the off-field concerns. Hernandez was removed from “a lot” of teams’ draft boards prior to being selected in the fourth round by New England, according to the SI report. Multiple former and current teammates vouched for Hernandez to SI, though, saying he has some minor maturity issues on the field, but that he is “a great kid at heart.” A former and current teammate told SI that Hernandez was “having some trouble with his past associates and was seeking distance from them.”

    too late

  14. #454
    Quote Originally Posted by Timmy® View Post
    Prior to the 2010 NFL draft, it was widely known that Aaron Hernandez had failed drug tests while at the University of Florida. That was apparently not the only reason the Patriots tight end fell to the fourth round. Some of Hernandez’s associates in his hometown of Bristol, Conn., were involved in gang activity, according to Sports Illustrated. Multiple NFL personnel sources and a law enforcement official told SI about the off-field concerns. Hernandez was removed from “a lot” of teams’ draft boards prior to being selected in the fourth round by New England, according to the SI report. Multiple former and current teammates vouched for Hernandez to SI, though, saying he has some minor maturity issues on the field, but that he is “a great kid at heart.” A former and current teammate told SI that Hernandez was “having some trouble with his past associates and was seeking distance from them.”

    too late
    Everyone is a great guy.

    Until they're not.

  15. #455
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainejet View Post
    So now you see EVERYTHING has come full circle.

    He lawyered up because he was GUILTY of something and he knew it.

    Once again, for the cheap seats to hear...

    People who lawyer up only INVITE more scrutiny by the cops. If he had just told them what they wanted to know, and if he was in fact NOT GUILTY, the truth would have come out and everything would have been over by now.

    But instead, just like all you f*cking legal scholars, he lawyered up. All that did was make the cops KNOW they were on the right track.

    But go ahead and live in you dumb a$$ world of paranoia, and think that everyone is out to get you.

    But I've got news for you. If you are innocent and you stay away from trouble? NO ONE, including the cops would ever think you are important enough to go after.
    This is astonishingly wrong that it completely takes my breath away. I mean props for sticking to your guns but not much beyond that.

    32 nailed it earlier in the thread and he is a retired cop. The police do not always have your best interests at heart and the wrong cop on the wrong day is not above trying to make a bogus charge stick if they have a mind to do that. This is an ex-cop that is saying this. Wake up and smell the coffee. It is OK to back off from a position once in a while. It shows you are open to an alternative point of view and the possibility of being persuaded.

  16. #456
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timmy® View Post
    Prior to the 2010 NFL draft, it was widely known that Aaron Hernandez had failed drug tests while at the University of Florida. That was apparently not the only reason the Patriots tight end fell to the fourth round. Some of Hernandez’s associates in his hometown of Bristol, Conn., were involved in gang activity, according to Sports Illustrated. Multiple NFL personnel sources and a law enforcement official told SI about the off-field concerns. Hernandez was removed from “a lot” of teams’ draft boards prior to being selected in the fourth round by New England, according to the SI report. Multiple former and current teammates vouched for Hernandez to SI, though, saying he has some minor maturity issues on the field, but that he is “a great kid at heart.” A former and current teammate told SI that Hernandez was “having some trouble with his past associates and was seeking distance from them.”

    too late
    Well he went from associating with known criminals back in the hood to working for known criminal enterprise in the NFL hood. What part of any of this is surprising?

    Love that "high character" Patriots philosophy. Are they still trying to sell that one or is the summertime stench too rancid right now?

  17. #457
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainejet View Post
    So now you see EVERYTHING has come full circle.

    He lawyered up because he was GUILTY of something and he knew it.

    Once again, for the cheap seats to hear...

    People who lawyer up only INVITE more scrutiny by the cops. If he had just told them what they wanted to know, and if he was in fact NOT GUILTY, the truth would have come out and everything would have been over by now.

    But instead, just like all you f*cking legal scholars, he lawyered up. All that did was make the cops KNOW they were on the right track.

    But go ahead and live in you dumb a$$ world of paranoia, and think that everyone is out to get you.

    But I've got news for you. If you are innocent and you stay away from trouble? NO ONE, including the cops would ever think you are important enough to go after.
    I'm with ya Maine....I get what you are saying!

  18. #458
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    Quote Originally Posted by John_0515 View Post
    You're right, Maine, innocent people have nothing to hide, but to be honest - having an attorney to consult isn't a bad idea. The legal system is not cut and dry, and if someone is close to a crime, but innocent, it's in that person's best interest to seek counsel in order to protect himself.

    I'm not saying that I believe Hernandez is in the clear, I'm just saying it's not a bad idea to consult with your attorney. If the police knocked on my door and asked me about a murder a mile away about someone that I have never met or known or heard of, and I had nothing to do with it - well, yes, I'm not speaking with my attorney. If I knew the guy, he was in my house the night before, I drove him around, and I hung around with 2 other people and the four of us went out and 3 of us came back, and I had nothing to do with it......well.....in that improbable instance I'd lawyer up.

    Hernandez has a world of legal trouble ahead of him. He may know, but not be involved. If that's true, at the very least he can get hit with obstruction at this point.
    This is what Maine has been saying all along....IF you are not involved, in any way shape or form, talk to the police, let them look, and they move on.
    But obviously, in AH's case, you MIGHT want a lawyer present, given the guy was murdered inches from your house, a vehicle in your name was present at the scene, you were seen with the deceased earlier blah blah blah.

  19. #459
    Yup, no need for lawyers. No one's ever been convicted falsely and then exonerated by DNA evidence for instance. Witnesses don't lie. Police don't get things wrong. Everything is hunky dorey.



    McCarthy and Hoover would be proud.

  20. #460
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    Quote Originally Posted by EM31 View Post
    This is astonishingly wrong that it completely takes my breath away. I mean props for sticking to your guns but not much beyond that.

    32 nailed it earlier in the thread and he is a retired cop. The police do not always have your best interests at heart and the wrong cop on the wrong day is not above trying to make a bogus charge stick if they have a mind to do that. This is an ex-cop that is saying this. Wake up and smell the coffee. It is OK to back off from a position once in a while. It shows you are open to an alternative point of view and the possibility of being persuaded.
    Sure...it happens. So lets just get completely paranoid and think that rogue cop is out to get us. The same could be said about your point of view (about POSSIBLY being persuaded).

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