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Thread: Patriots* Aaron Hernandez questioned then charged with murder. MERGED

  1. #2921
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottyM View Post
    Are you (and others) seriously trying to imply there could or should be a federal and/or congressional investigation into the Patriots? You are a lawyer right? Legally, what duty do the Patriots owe, civilly or criminally, to Lloyd or any member of the general public for an act of their employee outside the scope of their employment. This is law 101 and you sound like a complete and utter fool.
    I just hope he's not one of my lawyers.

    It has to either be an act or he's not really a lawyer.

  2. #2922
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottyM View Post
    Well unfortunately, you used the word "liability" again. As a lawyer, I'm sure you are fully aware that in order for someone or something to be "liable" there needs to be a duty, and furthermore, the breach of that duty directly caused the harm that occurred. In so far as there is clearly no duty, and you have conceded this, there is ZERO grounds for any federal agency or member of congress to stick its nose where it doesn't belong.

    You are correct that the NFL has antitrust immunity, unfortunately, and get this as it's a real mind blower, congressional authority to get involved in the NFL's business would be limited to alleged consumer protection or public interest based antitrust law violations.
    He's an idiot.

    But he's having fun. I might put him on ignore but he makes me laugh.

  3. #2923
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottyM View Post
    Well unfortunately, you used the word "liability" again. As a lawyer, I'm sure you are fully aware that in order for someone or something to be "liable" there needs to be a duty, and furthermore, the breach of that duty directly caused the harm that occurred. In so far as there is clearly no duty, and you have conceded this, there is ZERO grounds for any federal agency or member of congress to stick its nose where it doesn't belong.

    You are correct that the NFL has antitrust immunity, unfortunately, and get this as it's a real mind blower, congressional authority to get involved in the NFL's business would be limited to alleged consumer protection based antitrust law violations.
    A clear display of your ignorance. Just as your trolling colleague from 2 weeks ago who dismissed the initial reports when many of us said this was serious and AH was is serious trouble.

    Once again, I am not attributing Lloyd's murder to the Pats. Never did I say that in ANY post. No one knows that yet as the investigations just commenced. If you told me AH was an alleged serial killer two weeks ago, I would've said you are crazy. See how that works. The facts/evidence determines the eventual outcome, not a fan's hope and desire.

    Congressional authority to get into the NFL's business is limited to consumer protection? Ok. Another ignorant post by a troll who doesn't know what he is talking about. Congress can investigate any matter pertaining to the NFL it desires. Once again, antitrust immunity for the NFL is not limited only to consumer protections (I assume you mean the broadcast transmission disputes between the NFL and cable/satellite providers that has impacted fans across the country or blackouts in markets on gameday). The Congress is currently investigating player concussions....that is not a "consumer protection" issue.

    The standard for a congressional investigation will be "the public's interests" and making sure that the NFL and its Members are living up to that standard given that it has antitrust immunity and is tax exempt. As for the DOJ, like the Congress, the Justice Department has broad powers to investigate any alleged crimes. Given that this story is still developing and receiving tremendous public attention, don't for one minute fool yourself into thinking that any/if not all of the USA in the respective jurisdictions will not look into this matter.

  4. #2924
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    HERNANDEZ IZ INNOCENT GUYZ!!!

    NOBODY SAW HIM PULL THE TRIGGER!

    Except Lloyd... but he's DEAD, so there's NO PROOF!!!

    YAAAAAAAYYY!!! When he gets released Kraft and BB can sign him to a smaller contract!

    No big deal guys!!!!

  5. #2925
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    Quote Originally Posted by batman10023 View Post
    He's an idiot.

    But he's having fun. I might put him on ignore but he makes me laugh.
    No ahole, you are the idiot. I dare you to dispute one thing I said that is not correct. If not STFU, troll and go back to your cave.

  6. #2926
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    batman10023 is not a troll, jetsjumets

    he's a good jet fan

  7. #2927
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    Yup, Congress does not have the power to investigate the NFL? Only, according to the NE troll, if it pertains to "consumer protections."

    Exhibit A:


    Senate will investigate NFL over 'bounties' for injured players

    ← return to Inside Politics




    By Stephen Dinan - The Washington Times


    March 22, 2012, 03:02PM


    Sen. Richard J. Durbin announced Thursday he will hold hearings looking into the recent revelation that the New Orleans Saints paid players bounties for injuring other teams’ players.

    Mr. Durbin, Illinois Democrat and a member of the Judiciary Committee, also said he’ll look at whether it’s feasible to expand bribery laws to cover the practice.

    “When an injury is by design and is paid for, we’ve moved beyond any definition of sport,” Mr. Durbin said.

    He said he’ll ask for testimony from representatives of the major pro football, hockey, basketball and baseball leagues, as well as the NCAA, which governs major college sports.

    The NFL this week suspended several Saints coaches and docked the team some draft picks as a punishment.


    Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/blog/...unties-injured

  8. #2928
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    Quote Originally Posted by sg3 View Post
    batman10023 is not a troll, jetsjumets

    he's a good jet fan
    Thanks sg3.

    Even if he's a good jet fan, based off of his posts in this thread, I think he's an idiot.

  9. #2929
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    Exhibit B:

    NFL Disability Plan Draws Congressional Attention

    By Les Carpenter
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Tuesday, June 26, 2007


    For a quarter of a century John Hogan has burrowed through the pages of disability plans, looking for traps, digging for loopholes. His practice as a disability and Social Security lawyer in the Atlanta suburb of Sugar Hill, Ga., pits him against faceless bureaucracies of America's insurance industry almost every day, leaving him to wade through its muck of paperwork and regulations.

    Yet asked what organization is the worst at providing disability benefits to its employees, he doesn't hesitate.

    The NFL.

    "Not that insurance companies are easy," he said one recent morning from a downtown Atlanta conference room. "But insurance companies follow [government] timelines. They are supposed to rule 45 days after a claim is made. The NFL plan completely ignores it."

    Today, after months of complaints from retired players, the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Commercial and Administrative Law will hold a hearing to look into the league's pension and disability plans and the way they have been managed. Among those testifying will be former Minnesota Vikings guard Brent Boyd, who was turned down countless times despite a head injury that has left him unable to work, and Cyril Smith, the Baltimore lawyer who helped represent Hall of Fame center Mike Webster's family in a protracted battle against the plan that they finally won in 2005, three years after Webster's death.

    But perhaps more significant to the retirees will be Congress's interest in their own union, the NFL Players Association, which -- as a part manager of the plan -- they believe is to blame for their ordeals.

    "The way I see it, they're all tied in together," said Hart Lee Dykes, a former New England Patriots wide receiver and Hogan client who has been turned down four times despite being sent to eight doctors, three of whom declared him disabled. "The players association is supposed to be for the players, right? The players are suffering. What is the point?"

    Players and their attorneys complain that claims are not only drawn out but they are often turned down with little or no explanation. This, along with the extended time for ruling on benefits requests, could be considered violations of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, the guidelines used in most retirement and disability programs.

    Hogan and Smith both say this is highly unusual for disability plans. Normally, when dealing with insurance companies or big corporations, the notice of denial will include a list of missing documents the applicant needs to be reconsidered; for instance, an MRI exam of the spine for claims of a significant back injury. The applicant would then go get the MRI and either reapply or appeal.

    They point the finger for this confusion at the NFLPA in part because the players association has one representative on a two-person panel that makes the initial determination of disability. The union also chooses three members for the six-member board that decides on the fates of the players who have made it past the first panel.

    "It's typical in collective bargaining for a corporation to take its cue from the union," Smith said. "When you have [NFLPA executive director Gene] Upshaw say he is going to break [former player Joe] DeLamielleure's neck, that shows his interest in the issue since DeLamielleure was a critic of the disability process and Upshaw picks the guys on the board."

    Upshaw was quoted in a Philadelphia Daily News story as saying he would break DeLamielleure's neck as a response to the criticism. The union has said the comment was taken out of context.

    Hogan, who has taken Dykes's case to U.S. District Court in Atlanta to get degenerative disability benefits, successfully obtained disability benefits for another player a few years ago after filing a lawsuit on the player's behalf. The player has said he does not want to be identified or details of his case to be divulged. But in his battles with the disability plan, Hogan said he is shocked that the union does not provide legal advice to the players who are trying to get benefits and wonders why the players don't have a shop steward.

    The NFLPA bristles at the implication it doesn't support its members. Union spokesman Carl Francis said that any player looking for help in getting disability payments would be directed to the benefits department and would be given the proper forms to fill out. They would also be told how to file the application.

    "It's ridiculous to think we are denying disability claims to our players," Francis said.

    But Dykes, 40, has been fighting for disability pay for nearly a decade. He left football after his second NFL season with a broken kneecap. But as time went on, other ailments surfaced. His hips began to ache with the pain moving to his back. In the late 1990s he went to see a doctor near his Texas home who had treated him before. The doctor ruled him disabled based on his damaged knees.

    When he applied for disability, he was told to see a doctor in Chicago who declared him fit to work without even asking him to take off his pants. Another doctor told him he had a stress fracture in his back but said he could do sedentary work. A physician in Seattle also said he could do sedentary work but could not say what kind of work that would be or how many hours a week he could do that work.

    "Every time a doctor approves me I get denied and when I get turned down by a doctor I get denied," Dykes said in exasperation.

    Finally last year he applied again after the original doctor who examined him said his back was too bad to allow him to work. The plan sent him to a neutral physician they provided. That doctor also said he was disabled. But the claim was still denied -- his fourth denial -- and after the retirement board did not provide a detailed explanation, Hogan sued.

    Dykes and his attorney have been told that the claims committee is deadlocked on the issue of his disability and a member of the committee has found the medical evidence inconsistent.

    "Hart was not asking for retroactive benefits and they gave him a functional capacity test where the report indicated he couldn't even do sedentary work on a daily basis," Hogan said. The fact that they were not looking for retroactive benefits should have removed all previous examinations from consideration, Hogan said, leaving two doctors both concluding on his most recent application that he is disabled.

    The NFLPA concedes there are problems with the disability process. It rejects the demands of retired players who want the football pension to match baseball's, which is significantly higher. But the union's executives say disability must be improved.

    Last week, the NFL and the NFLPA quietly agreed to use Social Security guidelines to determine eligibility for the NFL's disability plan. The reason, the union explained, is to streamline the process, making it simpler for a player to get his payments. If a player has been awarded Social Security disability benefits he can apply to the NFL's retirement plan and get a disability benefit.

    The biggest advantage for players is that Social Security heavily relies on an applicant's primary physician in determining eligibility. This would seem to eliminate the need for players to travel around the country to be examined.

    But the agreement is short on details. For instance, would all Social Security rules apply? If so, the plan and the lawyer it shares with the players association, the Groom Law Group, could be bogged down in mountains of paperwork. Also, in order to be eligible for Social Security an employee usually has to file within five years of leaving the job. Most NFL players who file often don't do so until they have been out of the league closer to 10 years, when old injuries begin to manifest themselves.

    Dykes, for instance, would not have qualified for the Social Security disability benefit because he didn't apply until five years after he retired.

    Even worse, Social Security has a backlog of cases. Many are taking two to three years to get through the system. The wait with Social Security might even be longer.

    "Perhaps [Commissioner Roger] Goodell and Mr. Upshaw are unaware of this fact," Hogan wrote in a letter to the House committee. "As the NFLPA has long taken a stance that Social Security standards should not be applied to their plan, I am all the more skeptical that this may be some sort of ruse to take the heat off of them."

  10. #2930
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    Exhibit C:


    House steroid panel sets new target: NFL / NBA, NCAA and others also likely to be scrutinized



    Lance Williams, Mark Fainaru-Wada, Chronicle Staff Writers

    Published 4:00 am, Friday, April 1, 2005


    The congressional committee that conducted last month's high-profile hearings on steroid abuse in Major League Baseball now wants to look at the National Football League.

    The House Committee on Government Reform yesterday asked NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue to turn over documents regarding the league's 15-year-old steroids testing program -- including summaries of how many players have been caught using banned drugs and the details on the specific drugs they used.

    The committee wants the information as part of its "ongoing investigation into steroid policies for professional and amateur sports," according to a letter signed by committee chair Rep. Thomas Davis, R-Va., and Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Los Angeles, ranking minority member.

    A government source said that as soon as Monday, the committee would also ask for detailed information regarding drug-testing programs and policies in the National Basketball Association, the National Hockey League, Major League Soccer, the National Collegiate Athletic Association and USA Track & Field.

    The committee is investigating performance-enhancing drugs in American sports, "taking them in the order of what seems to be their state of crisis," said the source who asked not to be quoted by name. "Baseball was the most clearly in crisis."

    The panel is exploring the prospect of forcing all sports, amateur and professional, to adhere to one strict policy regarding performance-enhancing drugs.

    In its NFL probe, the committee will not seek the names of players who have tested positive for banned drugs, said Rob White, Davis' spokesman. He said the committee had not yet decided whether there would be an NFL version of the nationally televised hearings on steroids in baseball, which riveted attention on the problem of sports doping in America.

    Davis "has always said there would be more hearings, but the parameters haven't been worked out yet," the spokesman said.

    The NFL has boasted that it is far more serious about controlling performance-enhancing drugs than other professional sports. Over the years, 44 players have been suspended for using performance-enhancing substances, the NFL says. In 2003, four members of the Oakland Raiders tested positive for THG, the then-undetectable steroid at the center of the BALCO sports doping scandal.

    And in recent weeks, the State newspaper in Columbia, S.C., and the CBS program "60 Minutes Wednesday" have reported that a South Carolina doctor is under investigation for allegedly prescribing steroids to members of the NFL's Carolina Panthers during the 2003 season.

    In a statement, Waxman suggested that the Panthers case had caught the committee's attention.

    "New information has called into question the effectiveness of the NFL drug policy," he said. In a letter to the committee, Tagliabue said the league would comply with the request.

    The president of one NFL team who asked not to be quoted by name said he was uncertain about whether the NFL had a steroid problem.

    "I would say no, but maybe there's this secret society I have no idea about," the team president said. "I don't see much evidence of it in the classic sense of what you would look for. But who knows?" Prior to the reports regarding the Panthers and steroids, some lawmakers had regarded the NFL steroid policy as a model program that was far superior to the baseball program, which was widely regarded as weak.

    At a hearing before the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee last month, Adolpho Birch, the league's drug czar, testified that the NFL's steroid policy was "the most effective in professional sports. It calls for testing both during and after the NFL season, and a graduating scale ranging from a four-game suspension for a first offense to one year for a third-time offender.

    Some steroids experts have criticized the NFL's policy as too weak, questioning why there were so few positive drug tests over the years in a sport where steroid use has been presumed high.

    Other sports said they hadn't yet heard from the committee.

    "To my knowledge, we have not received a letter from Congress," said NBA spokesman Tim Frank. "When and if we do, obviously, we would cooperate fully."

    The NBA's policy requires first-year players to be tested once during training camp and up to three times during the season, while veterans are tested only at camp unless there is probable cause for additional testing. Penalties include a five-game suspension for a first positive steroid test, 10 games for a second and 25 for subsequent offenses.

    Since the NBA began testing for steroids in 1998, three players are known to have tested positive.

    At a press conference in St. Louis, NCAA president Myles Brand said he was confident college sports would avoid a baseball-like scandal because of its strong anti-drug policies.

    A college athlete caught using illegal or performance-enhancing drugs is suspended from competition for one year, Brand said. A second offense results in the revocation of a scholarship.

    Major League Soccer's top executives were not available for comment Thursday, but that league's drug-testing policy is one of the toughest in sports. The league's commissioner, Don Garber, can nullify a contract if a player tests positive for a performance-enhancing drug. Players also are subject to random testing for steroids and recreational drugs, in or out of season.

    USA Track & Field CEO Craig Masback said, "We support what Congress is doing to try to fight the battle against drugs, but it would be impossible to comment without seeing the letter."

    The NHL doesn't test players for steroids.

  11. #2931
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    Exhibit D, sure to get the NE trolls blood boiling on this "consumer issue."

    Friday, February 1, 2008
    Updated: February 2, 4:25 PM ET
    Senator wants to know why NFL destroyed Patriots spy tapes

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ESPN.com news services

    WASHINGTON -- With the Super Bowl fast approaching, a senior Republican senator says he wants the NFL to explain why it destroyed evidence from the New England Patriots cheating scandal.


    "I am very concerned about the underlying facts on the taping, the reasons for the judgment on the limited penalties and, most of all, on the inexplicable destruction of the tapes," Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., wrote Thursday in a letter to NFL commissioner Roger Goodell.


    The story was first reported by The New York Times.

    Specter, the top Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee, said the matter could put the league's antitrust exemption at risk. In a telephone interview with the Times on Thursday, he said the committee at some point will call Goodell to address the antitrust exemption as well as the destruction of the tapes.


    "Their antitrust exemption has been on my mind for a long time," he said in a Capitol Hill news conference Friday.


    Goodell, in his previously scheduled news conference Friday in Phoenix, said, "I am more than willing to speak with the senator. There are very good explanations why the tapes were destroyed by our staff -- there was no purpose for them."



    There were six tapes, according to Goodell -- some from the 2007 preseason, and the rest from 2006. He also said they were destroyed in order to prevent leaks to the media, as one tape was leaked to the media just after the Patriots-New York Jets game in September 2007, when NFL security confiscated a video camera and tape from a Patriots video assistant during New England's 38-14 victory over New York at Giants Stadium.

    "We wanted to take and destroy that information," Goodell said. "They may have collected it within the rules, but we couldn't determine that. So we felt that it should be destroyed."


    The matter might not compare to the CIA's destruction of interrogation tapes, Specter said Friday, but he added, "I do believe that it is a matter of importance. It's not going to displace the stimulus package or the Iraq war, but I think the integrity of football is very important, and I think the National Football League has a special duty to the American people -- and further the Congress -- because they have an antitrust exemption."


    "It's a league matter," Patriots coach Bill Belichick said Friday during his news conference. "I don't know anything about it."


    Fish on Walsh
    ESPN.com senior writer Mike Fish talks with ESPNews anchor Fred Hickman with insight on Matt Walsh and his potential role in the Patriots spy situation. Fish


    Matt Walsh, a former Patriots video assistant who now is a golf pro at the Ka'anapli Golf Resort in Lahaina, Hawaii, has suggested to ESPN that he has information that could have exposed the Patriots prior to the situation at the Jets game, which ended with record fines.

    "If I had a reason to want to go public or tell a story, I could have done it before it even broke," he told ESPN.com's Mike Fish. "I could have said everything rather than having [Jets coach Eric] Mangini be the one to bring it out."

    Walsh, who worked for the Patriots from 1996 until the winter of 2002-03, when he was fired, also has suggested to ESPN that he has information that could be embarrassing for the NFL and the Patriots. He has not been contacted by the league.

    "If they're doing a thorough investigation … they didn't contact me, so draw your own conclusions," Walsh told Fish.

    Walsh said he hasn't made a decision on whether he will talk to Congress if asked, although he is considering it. He also was quoted in the Times' story Friday.

    The Patriots play Sunday in the Super Bowl against the New York Giants.

    The controversy started when a Patriots video assistant was accused of aiming his camera at the Jets' defensive coaches as they signaled to players on the field.


    After the league investigation, Goodell fined Belichick $500,000, the maximum amount, and docked the team $250,000 and a first-round draft pick. It was the biggest fine for a coach and the first time in NFL history a first-round draft pick was confiscated as a penalty.


    I do believe that it is a matter of importance. It's not going to displace the stimulus package or the Iraq war, but I think the integrity of football is very important, and I think the National Football League has a special duty to the American people -- and further the Congress -- because they have an antitrust exemption.
    --Sen. Arlen Specter



    After its investigation, the NFL said it destroyed all materials, including the six tapes it received from the Patriots.

    Goodell said the tapes showed coaches making signals and showed indications of down and distances. According to the commissioner, one of the tapes showed an opposing coach waving to the cameraman as if he knew he was being taped.

    "I think it probably had a limited effect -- if any -- on the outcome of any game," Goodell said.

    He added: "I don't think it taints their accomplishments. I think the action that we took was decisive, and it was unprecedented and it sent a loud message not only to the Patriots but to every NFL team that you should follow the rules and you better follow the rules.

    "I think what they did this season was certainly done within the rules and on a level playing field. And I think their record is extraordinary. We know it's never been done before at 18-0, and I think they should be congratulated on that."


    In a Jan. 31 letter to Specter, which the senator released Friday, Goodell said the tapes and notes on the investigation were destroyed to ensure that the Patriots "would not secure any possible competitive advantage as a result of the misconduct."


    Specter said the explanation "absolutely makes no sense at all" and blasted the commissioner for failing to respond to his inquiries into the matter for more than two months. His initial letter to the league was dated Nov. 15, 2007; the follow-up letter was dated Dec. 19. Goodell said in his letter to Specter that he just became aware of Specter's questions Thursday.

    "There's a credibility issue here," Specter said.


    Specter, a lifelong Philadelphia Eagles fan who still calls sports radio stations on Monday mornings, said he was concerned about the integrity of the sport.


    "I don't think you have to have a law broken to have a legitimate interest by the Congress on the integrity of the game. … What if there was something on the tapes we might want to be subpoenaed, for example? You can't destroy it. That would be obstruction of justice," Specter said to The Times.


    There is no timetable for when the committee would call upon Goodell.


    The possibility exists that Patriots employees or other NFL personnel would have to testify before the committee.


    "It's premature to say whom we're going to call or when," Specter said. "It starts with the commissioner. He had the tapes, and he made the decision as to what the punishment could be. He made the decision to destroy them."


    Specter stopped short of alleging a cover-up, but he warned that the judiciary panel might want to probe the matter.


    In the meantime, Specter said he might miss Sunday's game.


    "I may play squash while it's on," Specter said.

    Information from ESPN senior writer Mike Fish, ESPN producer Ben Houser and The Associated Press is included in this report.

  12. #2932
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    Exhibit E:


    http://www.nydailynews.com/blogs/ite...th-hormone-use



    April 3, 2013 10:27 PM

    Politicians turn up the heat on NFL about testifying on human growth hormone use

    BY Christian Red


    Two months after he and his colleague, Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), threatened to bring National Football League players to Capitol Hill to testify before Congress on the issue of testing for human growth hormone, Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.) turned up the verbal heat Wednesday.



    "It's either put up or shut up," Cummings told USA Today Sports. "They'll have to explain to the American public, why there's no testing (for HGH). I don't think that it would be a pretty picture."



    Although the league and its players' union agreed in principle to implement HGH testing when they signed a new collective bargaining agreement in the summer of 2011, there is still no testing of the drug to date. Major League Baseball announced in January that it would test players for HGH starting this season.



    Cummings and Issa, who are members of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform, raised their concerns about the stalemate on the HGH testing issue between the NFL and the union in late January, writing a letter to NFL union boss DeMaurice Smith. But Wednesday, Cummings hinted a hearing on the issue, where players would be called to testify, could come as early as July.



    "They are pushing our committee into a corner," Cummings told USA Today, "where we won't have any choice but for them to come to Washington."

    But Cummings added that the threat of a congressional hearing might be enough alone to have the two sides resolve the manner.


    "I don't believe the players will let it get that far," Cummings said of holding a hearing.

  13. #2933
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    Exhibit F. Of course, this is another example of a consumer issue. This is a perfect illustration of the "broad powers" Congress has to look into any matter pertaining to the NFL -- the team's nickname for a NFL Member.



    Tuesday, May 28, 2013
    Updated: May 30, 1:50 PM ET
    U.S. reps urge end to 'Redskins'

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Associated Press


    The controversy surrounding the Redskins' name has come up often in the past month, with even members of Congress weighing in. Is it time for the team to change its name.


    WASHINGTON -- Ten members of Congress are urging the Washington Redskins to change their name because it is offensive to many Native Americans.

    The representatives said Tuesday that they've sent letters to Redskins owner Dan Snyder, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, Redskins sponsor FedEx, and the other 31 NFL franchises.

    The letter to Snyder says that "Native Americans throughout the country consider the 'R-word' a racial, derogatory slur akin to the 'N-word' among African Americans or the 'W-word' among Latinos."


    Congress Wants Change

    Ten members of Congress have sent a letter to Redskins owner Daniel Snyder urging the team to change their name because it's offensive to Native Americans. PDF


    Among the group sending the letters are the leaders of the Congressional Native American Caucus, Tom Cole, R-Okla., and Betty McCollum, D-Minn.

    The nickname is the subject of a long-running legal challenge from a group seeking to have the team lose its trademark protection.

    Snyder has vowed that he will never change the name.

  14. #2934
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    Exhibit G.


    NFL tries to avoid Hill hearings
    By: Byron Tau
    June 1, 2013 04:10 PM EDT

    Are you ready for some … hearings? The National Football League isn’t.

    The league is doing all the blocking and tackling it can to avoid a full-scale congressional investigation and the televised spectacle of star players testifying under oath.

    Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle are taking aim at the use of human growth hormone, the NFL’s unique status as a nonprofit, the special antitrust exemption granted to professional football, and a number of other player health, safety and labor issues.

    (PHOTOS: Political football)

    A key congressman has given the NFL and the players union a July deadline — the opening of NFL training camps — to resolve the ongoing fight over HGH testing or face hearings. The league and the NFL Players Association agreed two years ago to mandatory HGH tests but no tests have yet taken place.

    The congressional interest in HGH resembles the scrutiny of steroid use by Major League Baseball players in recent years, and the NFL has only to look there for a cautionary tale. Mark McGwire’s refusal to answer questions at a famed 2005 hearing on steroid use; a 2008 follow-up hearing led to perjury charges for Roger Clemens. (He was found not guilty last year.).

    “There’s nothing good for the NFL to come out of hearings like this,” said former Rep. Tom Davis (R-Va.), who chaired the 2005 House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing. “It just exposes their dirty underwear.”

    Baseball was slow to resolve its drug issue, Davis said, so Congress and federal investigators stepped in.

    (PHOTOS: Fifth Amendment use on the Hill)

    “We shone a light on something that wasn’t very pretty, and it got cleaned up,” Davis said about the baseball hearings. “But it’s a lot harder and the risks are higher now” for the NFL.

    Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.), the ranking member of the House oversight committee, said in April that he wanted a resolution to the HGH issue by July — or his committee would start calling players to testify under oath. Oversight Chairman Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) and Cummings wrote the union in January to demand answers on the HGH use.

    According to a spokesperson for the oversight committee, the players union provided the requested documents and information. The committee declined to share them with POLITICO, citing privacy.

    “Our position has been that we want the NFL players to do what they’ve already agreed to do,” Cummings told POLITICO. “They agreed in their contracts almost two years ago that they would take the test.

    “It sends a strong message to children that they’re willing to subject themselves to these tests,” he added.

    The league has primarily been trying to use its clout on Capitol Hill to push for a resolution of the drug issue without congressional interference. The NFL’s lobbying campaign mostly used their outside firms for quiet, targeted outreach to the offices that care most about the issue: Issa; Cummings; Rep. Henry Waxman, the top Energy and Commerce Committee Democrat; and Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.).


    “We have been clear in our belief that HGH testing is necessary — we’ve been clear about that for several years,” said Adolpho Birch, the NFL’s senior vice president of labor policy and government affairs.

    “We understand that the committee has an interest and we are making every effort to cooperate with them,” he added. But “hearings are not something that should be taken lightly by anyone.”

    George Atallah, the NFLPA’s assistant executive director of external affairs, said the union doesn’t mind Congress’s interest or oversight.

    “From our perspective, we’re more than happy to have Congress involved on the broader health and safety topics,” Atallah said, adding the union will wait as long as it takes to get a fair testing protocol in place for its players.

    “We have never put a timetable on getting a testing protocol that is fair and just,” Atallah said.

    The ongoing Internal Revenue Service scandal involving scrutiny of conservative nonprofit groups isn’t helping the league avoid the congressional spotlight. NFL franchises pay taxes, but the league itself — along with the National Hockey League and the Professional Golfers Association — is classified a nonprofit trade association.

    Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) introduced an amendment to the Internet sales tax bill in April that would have stripped sports leagues of their tax-exempt status. Members of Congress in the past have also used the nonprofit issue as a way to poke the NFL.

    Coburn has vowed to try again — perhaps as part of a broader tax reform package.

    “It’s an issue he’s going to continue to push and advocate for,” said Coburn spokesman John Hart. “What he’s trying to do is raise the issue and frankly educate the public about the ridiculousness of the Tax Code.”

    The NFL is the hub of America’s most popular sport with TV contracts worth billions of dollars, teams valued at hundreds of millions of dollars and players making millions of dollars.

    So like any other big business that faces the possibility of congressional scrutiny, both the league and the players union have powerful K Street firms at work on Capitol Hill: The league has spent over $1 million per year on lobbying and has almost two dozen people on retainer at big-time firms including Covington & Burling, Elmendorf Ryan, Gephardt Government Affairs and John Dudinsky & Associates.

    The NFLPA has lobbying powerhouse Patton Boggs on retainer — and its current executive director, DeMaurice

    Smith, was a longtime attorney for Patton.

    Happy Carlock contributed to this report.

    © 2013 POLITICO LLC

  15. #2935
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    My point is made. Now the 3 idiots Batman, Scotty and Bob, Grickhead, Gronk/Vinny can provide us their uninformed opinions once again.

  16. #2936
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetssjumets View Post
    My point is made. Now the 3 idiots Batman, Scotty and Bob, Grickhead, Gronk/Vinny can provide us their uninformed opinions once again.
    Waste of goverment time.

    Am I happy that AH isn't paying for the pats. U bet
    Do I think the pats should get salary cap relief. Nope
    Do I think there needs to be a congressional investigation. Heck no.

    They took a gamble and lost. Plain and simple.

    This season stop by the west clubs and we can discuss this further over some beers

  17. #2937
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    Quote Originally Posted by sg3 View Post
    batman10023 is not a troll, jetsjumets

    he's a good jet fan
    Thanks sg3.

    Looking forward to a good season, I think we do better with lower expectations

  18. #2938
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetssjumets View Post
    A clear display of your ignorance. Just as your trolling colleague from 2 weeks ago who dismissed the initial reports when many of us said this was serious and AH was is serious trouble.

    Once again, I am not attributing Lloyd's murder to the Pats. Never did I say that in ANY post. No one knows that yet as the investigations just commenced. If you told me AH was an alleged serial killer two weeks ago, I would've said you are crazy. See how that works. The facts/evidence determines the eventual outcome, not a fan's hope and desire.

    Congressional authority to get into the NFL's business is limited to consumer protection? Ok. Another ignorant post by a troll who doesn't know what he is talking about. Congress can investigate any matter pertaining to the NFL it desires. Once again, antitrust immunity for the NFL is not limited only to consumer protections (I assume you mean the broadcast transmission disputes between the NFL and cable/satellite providers that has impacted fans across the country or blackouts in markets on gameday). The Congress is currently investigating player concussions....that is not a "consumer protection" issue.

    The standard for a congressional investigation will be "the public's interests" and making sure that the NFL and its Members are living up to that standard given that it has antitrust immunity and is tax exempt. As for the DOJ, like the Congress, the Justice Department has broad powers to investigate any alleged crimes. Given that this story is still developing and receiving tremendous public attention, don't for one minute fool yourself into thinking that any/if not all of the USA in the respective jurisdictions will not look into this matter.
    What do you think anti-trust law is? In so far as the NFL has the exemption, Congress can regulate and get involved in matters that pertain to how the NFL conducts itself as a business (in a non-competitive industry)- including player benefits, player safety, and consumer protection with regard to the product that is put on the field (which was the attempted argument by Arlen Specter with Spygate). These are issues that affect the business of the NFL and I certainly don't see how a murder investigation fits in.

    THe only reason federal agency might get involved is the alleged intra-state nature of what occurred. However, there is zero to support the proposition that the Patriots would be involved in any way outside of your laughable theories such as "Hernandez was storing weapons at Gillete"

  19. #2939
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    Quote Originally Posted by batman10023 View Post
    Waste of goverment time.

    Am I happy that AH isn't paying for the pats. U bet
    Do I think the pats should get salary cap relief. Nope
    Do I think there needs to be a congressional investigation. Heck no.

    They took a gamble and lost. Plain and simple.

    This season stop by the west clubs and we can discuss this further over some beers
    Sg3 says you are a Jets fan. Great. I am not here to get into a pissing battle with you. Nor am I trying to be like SAR and make this about me or what I do for a living. I am here to discuss football.

    However, I don't take kindly to you calling me an "idiot" especially when I know what I am talking about. As I posted previously, I work for an international law firm in the DC office -- government/regulatory practice. Some of these NE trolls are nothing but a bunch of fools who believe that NE is great and that the laws do not apply to them. I cannot think of one other professional sports team that has had as many issues as NE the past several years.

    As for what you or I may think, in all due respects, it doesn't matter. It's what Congress thinks -- jjust look at the few examples I posted. And notice, the NFL does not want congressional hearings. My point is very simple, Congress has broad powers to investigate the NFL given the special exemptions the NFL enjoys. Whether we like it or not, approve or disapprove, doesn't matter. The same holds true for DOJ as it pertains to alleged criminal activity or competitive issues.

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