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Thread: BR: Root Cause of Geno Dropping and QBs

  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by sg3 View Post
    Any team that valued Alex Smith or Kevin Kolb orMatt Flynn ahead of Smith (or Manuel or even Glennon) needs better personnel evaluators
    I, in a way, atleast understand the Alex Smith one. Mainly, because that's a team that has the possibility of a quick turn around. They have other pieces in order there. With a new coaching staff that wants to make an instant impact, I can see why they went with Smith (who at the time was perceived to be of lesser cost than acquiring Geno) over Geno. They had no way of knowing Geno would fall past their second pick, so at the time of their decision, they probably evaluated it as Geno plus whoever with our second pick isn't as good as Eric Fisher and Alex Smith. I think if given the choice of Eric Fisher and Geno/Alex Smith, they might have thought differently. While I don't agree with it, there is a tangible line of thought there.

    Kolb wasn't really valued over Smith, just that Manuel was valued over Smith by Buffalo. I'm guessing Manuel won them over with his personality and upside, sort of how we got stuck with Sanchez.

    I have absolutely no idea what the Raiders were doing with Flynn. That is not a win now team. They could've afforded to let Geno develop or any other QB and gone from there. That move makes very little sense to me.

    Quote Originally Posted by JamesR View Post
    When I read this I wondered - who would a league average QB equate to? So i had a look on NFL.com at passing stats, and having tried to filter out "gimmick" ratings for guys that threw one pass and such like, a league average QB (based on passer rating) comes out as Joe Flacco, Andy Dalton, Eli Manning. Cam Newton. If you do the same based on completion % you get Kaepernick, Dalton again, Ponder and Palmer. Lastly, if you go by TD's, you get Flacco, Palmer, Schaub and Bradford.

    So yes, I would agree that average play at QB would be huge for us.
    There was a stat the other day, about Sanchez being like the worst QB over the 4 years in league overall. He's so bad, that it really is comical at this point. I sometimes like to go back and read 2009 scouting reports just for a laugh, especially the one by Walter Football, that said his ability to read defenses and limit mistakes as his best ability.

    It's not even that he doesn't have the arm talent. He has an ok to good arm, but his mental game is just shot. Part of that might be because he played with such good talent around him in college and his first two years here, that he can't adjust to mediocre talent. A lot of times, he seems to just throw it up, assuming his guy is just going to be physically better than the defender and use that ability to catch the ball. It worked in USC, but not in the NFL.


    Quote Originally Posted by DDNYjets View Post
    You can't just look at the stats. Mark was responsible for 32 TDs in 2011 which is pretty decent but does anybody think he had a good year? No b.c he turned the ball over 28 times. Part of being an "average" QB is making good decisions, holding onto the ball with two hands and not fumbling, not throwing INTs to DL. The stats only tell us so much.

    With average QB play we make the playoffs in 2011 and probably win 9 games in 2012. Houston, Tennessee and San Diego are all games that we likely win with better QB play.
    Yeah, ties into the earlier part of my post here, he just doesn't have the mental capacity to limit mistakes. It's almost as if he knows a limited amount of plays, and if those plays aren't working or are being covered, he just throws it up with a prayer.

    I also don't think I've seen a QB this horrible at leading his WRs. We're dead last year, and it wasn't even close. The second worst team, had like 200 more YAC yards than we did. Almost all our catches have the WR either stopping, jumping, diving, turning around, and going out of bounds.

    Quote Originally Posted by lamont_jordan_rules View Post
    Figure this is as good a place to add this info as any ...

    I have been doing everything possible to find any "hard" details about our QB situation that I can ... I was able to hear the following ... Thought it may be worth passing along to you guys:

    Sirius radio interviewed Rex Ryan

    Amongst other thing Jim Miller discussed with him Geno Smith

    Afterwards, here is the breakdown of Rexís answers that Jim believes.

    1. Geno has mechanical issues at this time

    Jim says that he feels Geno doesnít open up his left shoulder enough when rolling out to his left.

    2. Needs work getting snaps from Center

    Not able to go shotgun like he did in college.
    Needs to perfect getting the ball from center.
    Has footwork issues need to be tweaked.
    Dropping back from center there is timing with certain routes based on how many steps the dropback is (3 Ė 5- 7) Geno needs to know these

    Jim says that Geno is going to get snaps with the 1ís. He needs to show improvement with the mechanical issues & snap under center issues ... And most important needs to show it consistently.

    Jimís bottom line option is at this point Geno is not ready
    Geno definitely has some things to work out. Besides the drop backs, he needs to get adjusted to the speed of the game. The defensive players are faster in the NFL, so he needs to adjust his anticipation and throwing velocity to match it. Even Andrew Luck or Russel Wilson, started out slow last year in their adjustments.

    In Luck's case, he's such a good passer that he can over-come a dead roster and adjust on the run. What we'd more likely be hoping for is the Wilson case, where if Geno is starting, we can surround him with a good OL, decent RB, and a good defense to take the pressure off. If you remember last year, Wilson didn't have much of a receiving core either, but as he got adjusted to the league, their offense became much more dangerous. If Geno were to start, he would have an adjustment period as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dreamers View Post
    The thing your not getting is this may be his only shot. We drafted him to play this year. Next year if we arent sold on him someone else will be brought in. Your thinking this team has a long term commitment to him. That is not the case. He is a low risk high reward gamble. Either he looks like the future this year or he will just be our BU competing with someone else next year. Your not going to see that if he is sitting on the bench. Sitting him if he is the better QB doesnt help him or the team really. He is not going to be behind a horrid OL and he has the weapons to make plays. The only reason not to start him is if he just isnt any good at all. I'd say a majority of the starters in the NFL where day one not ready guys. Will we be saying Washington ruined RG3 starting him early in the future? Maybe but it was a gamble they had to make. For that matter was it a bad move for Seattle to go Wilson or Carolina to throw Cam Newton to the wolves? Maybe. You can in hind site all you want but teams that dont make the best move for the team right now seldom win. I could care less about next year or the year after. Geno gives us the best chance to win right now. If not ho well not many are expecting him to succeed. That just gives him more motivation IMO. If we had a viable option to groom him maybe Id argee but we just dont. There is no Kerry Collins or Chad Pennington on the roster right now. He doesnt have very big shoes to fill so for him succeeding just means NOT being one of the 2 worst starters in the league 4 years in a row.
    It's a catch 22 though. If throwing Geno out there gives us the best shot to win, we also could be limiting his upside by not letting him develop properly. I'd rather see him beat out Mark for sure, before handing him the job. If he can't beat out Sanchez, he needs to sit and learn.

  2. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by Win4ever View Post
    I, in a way, atleast understand the Alex Smith one. Mainly, because that's a team that has the possibility of a quick turn around. They have other pieces in order there. With a new coaching staff that wants to make an instant impact, I can see why they went with Smith (who at the time was perceived to be of lesser cost than acquiring Geno) over Geno. They had no way of knowing Geno would fall past their second pick, so at the time of their decision, they probably evaluated it as Geno plus whoever with our second pick isn't as good as Eric Fisher and Alex Smith. I think if given the choice of Eric Fisher and Geno/Alex Smith, they might have thought differently. While I don't agree with it, there is a tangible line of thought there.

    Kolb wasn't really valued over Smith, just that Manuel was valued over Smith by Buffalo. I'm guessing Manuel won them over with his personality and upside, sort of how we got stuck with Sanchez.

    I have absolutely no idea what the Raiders were doing with Flynn. That is not a win now team. They could've afforded to let Geno develop or any other QB and gone from there. That move makes very little sense to me.



    There was a stat the other day, about Sanchez being like the worst QB over the 4 years in league overall. He's so bad, that it really is comical at this point. I sometimes like to go back and read 2009 scouting reports just for a laugh, especially the one by Walter Football, that said his ability to read defenses and limit mistakes as his best ability.

    It's not even that he doesn't have the arm talent. He has an ok to good arm, but his mental game is just shot. Part of that might be because he played with such good talent around him in college and his first two years here, that he can't adjust to mediocre talent. A lot of times, he seems to just throw it up, assuming his guy is just going to be physically better than the defender and use that ability to catch the ball. It worked in USC, but not in the NFL.




    Yeah, ties into the earlier part of my post here, he just doesn't have the mental capacity to limit mistakes. It's almost as if he knows a limited amount of plays, and if those plays aren't working or are being covered, he just throws it up with a prayer.

    I also don't think I've seen a QB this horrible at leading his WRs. We're dead last year, and it wasn't even close. The second worst team, had like 200 more YAC yards than we did. Almost all our catches have the WR either stopping, jumping, diving, turning around, and going out of bounds.



    Geno definitely has some things to work out. Besides the drop backs, he needs to get adjusted to the speed of the game. The defensive players are faster in the NFL, so he needs to adjust his anticipation and throwing velocity to match it. Even Andrew Luck or Russel Wilson, started out slow last year in their adjustments.

    In Luck's case, he's such a good passer that he can over-come a dead roster and adjust on the run. What we'd more likely be hoping for is the Wilson case, where if Geno is starting, we can surround him with a good OL, decent RB, and a good defense to take the pressure off. If you remember last year, Wilson didn't have much of a receiving core either, but as he got adjusted to the league, their offense became much more dangerous. If Geno were to start, he would have an adjustment period as well.



    It's a catch 22 though. If throwing Geno out there gives us the best shot to win, we also could be limiting his upside by not letting him develop properly. I'd rather see him beat out Mark for sure, before handing him the job. If he can't beat out Sanchez, he needs to sit and learn.
    Walter Football actually said that he struggles reading defenses - "Needs a little more work on reading defenses "

    Their scouting report on him is actually pretty spot on: He is a great athlete, with a solid motion, looks the part, can roll out and throw on the move, but is inexperienced with the game. Thats pretty much our guy.

  3. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by eaglenj View Post
    Walter Football actually said that he struggles reading defenses - "Needs a little more work on reading defenses "

    Their scouting report on him is actually pretty spot on: He is a great athlete, with a solid motion, looks the part, can roll out and throw on the move, but is inexperienced with the game. Thats pretty much our guy.
    I think there is 2 reports then, because this is what I found:

    "Sanchez's mental game is outstanding he prepares well and reads defenses exceptionally. He displays excellent instincts and does a great job victimizing the defense. Sanchez maintains great concentration throughout the course of the game. He does a good job of adjusting to the defense and taking what they give him."

    http://walterfootball.com/scoutingre...09msanchez.php

  4. #64
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    Sanchez was never very accurate. What he was was an improviser. He bought time with his legs, and he made big plays. That offset the poor drop back, read the defense, and get the ball out in a small window thing. If you're going to have a low %, and a high int. rate, then like Eli, or Farve, you have to have a big payoff. They tried to turn him into a game manager, and that ruined him. Now it's gotten to the point where he's holding the ball too tight, and double triple clutching. No way he's hitting a receiver in stride like that, and worse he's throwing the ball late. Teams are baiting him, and he doesn't make them pay for it. Even on check downs he's late, and has no touch because he's stiff. So yes it's Shotty's fault for giving him a lousy offense to suit his style. Rex' fault for trying to put a leash on him, and Sanchez' fault for crumbling under the pressure. That said, watching Geno on film I see the same style of player with way more physical skill, and much more attitude. If Mark had been more aggressive, he could have convinced the coaches, and the receivers to follow him. I have a feeling Geno will let people know what he feels comfortable with, and what he thinks is a mistake. At least after he gets a few games under his belt. It sure won't hurt to have Mornhinweg, and Lee, rather than Shotty, and Cavenaugh.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by lamont_jordan_rules View Post
    Figure this is as good a place to add this info as any ...

    I have been doing everything possible to find any "hard" details about our QB situation that I can ... I was able to hear the following ... Thought it may be worth passing along to you guys:

    Sirius radio interviewed Rex Ryan

    Amongst other thing Jim Miller discussed with him Geno Smith

    Afterwards, here is the breakdown of Rexís answers that Jim believes.

    1. Geno has mechanical issues at this time

    Jim says that he feels Geno doesnít open up his left shoulder enough when rolling out to his left.

    2. Needs work getting snaps from Center

    Not able to go shotgun like he did in college.
    Needs to perfect getting the ball from center.
    Has footwork issues need to be tweaked.
    Dropping back from center there is timing with certain routes based on how many steps the dropback is (3 Ė 5- 7) Geno needs to know these

    Jim says that Geno is going to get snaps with the 1ís. He needs to show improvement with the mechanical issues & snap under center issues ... And most important needs to show it consistently.

    Jimís bottom line option is at this point Geno is not ready
    This is what I said about Jets West. No analysts seem to be mentioning it. Go figure. Geno ,I believe is working in Florida on his drops. Need a center, a ball, and a coach. He doesn't need to work on anything else until he has his drops down in muscle memory. What good is building timing with receivers, if your not in the exact same place, at the exact same time, every time. If he wants to compete in camp he should have that down by the time he gets there. I'm hoping not to have many 7 step drops this year however. The league has moved on from that, and I don't think Marty will call many of those.

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Win4ever View Post
    A lot of times, he seems to just throw it up, assuming his guy is just going to be physically better than the defender and use that ability to catch the ball. It worked in USC, but not in the NFL.
    Yeah, ties into the earlier part of my post here, he just doesn't have the mental capacity to limit mistakes. It's almost as if he knows a limited amount of plays, and if those plays aren't working or are being covered, he just throws it up with a prayer.
    What gets me is that he doesn't seem to know the game situation. You're down 10-0, end of the 1st half vs SF and you're in FG range. You HAVE to protect the ball. You want the TD but you have to make sure you get at least the 3. He turns the ball over and the game has a completely different feel. Did the same in Tenn. Turnovers when the 3 would have helped and you come away with nothing and set up a score for the opponent. Just plain stupid.

  7. #67
    I'm praying that Geno beats out Sanchez!
    What's worse than having a lame duck coach?
    A lame duck QB! Total waste of a year.

  8. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by NY's stepchild View Post
    Sanchez was never very accurate. What he was was an improviser. He bought time with his legs, and he made big plays. That offset the poor drop back, read the defense, and get the ball out in a small window thing. If you're going to have a low %, and a high int. rate, then like Eli, or Farve, you have to have a big payoff. They tried to turn him into a game manager, and that ruined him. Now it's gotten to the point where he's holding the ball too tight, and double triple clutching. No way he's hitting a receiver in stride like that, and worse he's throwing the ball late. Teams are baiting him, and he doesn't make them pay for it. Even on check downs he's late, and has no touch because he's stiff. So yes it's Shotty's fault for giving him a lousy offense to suit his style. Rex' fault for trying to put a leash on him, and Sanchez' fault for crumbling under the pressure. That said, watching Geno on film I see the same style of player with way more physical skill, and much more attitude. If Mark had been more aggressive, he could have convinced the coaches, and the receivers to follow him. I have a feeling Geno will let people know what he feels comfortable with, and what he thinks is a mistake. At least after he gets a few games under his belt. It sure won't hurt to have Mornhinweg, and Lee, rather than Shotty, and Cavenaugh.
    I think Sanchez's main problem is just decision making. He's just not quick enough to make decisions on a consistent basis, especially on checkdowns. It's almost as if he has a primary receiver on a play, and just hopes the guy gets open, instead of checking out other WRs on the play as well. I've seen him time and time again lock into a WR and just not pay any attention to anyone else.

    It's masked in college, because he had a great line, and an athletic WR corps, so he could wait until the guys were actually open. If you watch his highlights from college, a high number of passes are thrown with no one around the WR. It's not him throwing open the WR, there just isn't anyone around, and he's all but lobbing the ball up there almost.

    I'm not sure if he has the ability to be a roll out QB, because to do that on a somewhat consistent basis, you almost have to run a quasi read option offense for the defense to actually bite. And I'm not sure he would've held up with constant hits. Remember, this is a guy that took like 2 years or so and outside help, just to learn how to slide. They used to make a big deal about how he always slid head first, so I'm not sure how long he could've gone with roll outs on a consistent basis.


    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Nut View Post
    What gets me is that he doesn't seem to know the game situation. You're down 10-0, end of the 1st half vs SF and you're in FG range. You HAVE to protect the ball. You want the TD but you have to make sure you get at least the 3. He turns the ball over and the game has a completely different feel. Did the same in Tenn. Turnovers when the 3 would have helped and you come away with nothing and set up a score for the opponent. Just plain stupid.

    He's just so slow with his decision making, that it's ridiculous. The SF game, I can atleast forgive to be honest, just because they had a great defense, and we just weren't going to score too much on them anyway. They were going to kill Sanchez one way or another, because they have a physical and fast defense. Sanchez's only skill is the pump fake, and by the second pump fake, the rushers were in his face. The Titans one was horrible, because they had like the worst defense in the league. I think they gave up the most points or something, and we still couldn't do anything. He just makes stupid turnovers and mistakes that kill the team. I understand other team's players making great plays, like the Patrick Peterson INT in the Cards game. That was just a sick play by Peterson, and you just tip your cap to him. But Sanchez's interceptions are rarely great plays by the other team, it's usually headed right towards the defender like the first Pats game, where he under-threw Hill, who was wide open in the end zone, and the CB who was ATLEAST a good 10-15 yards behind Hill ran under the pass and intercepted it.

    Anyway, borrowing from BR again, just wanted to give visual evidence of Sanchez's horrible decision making. Not sure if it was posted before, sorry if it's a repeat.

    Seattle Game, Stephen Hill WIDE OPEN in the end zone, defense in zone coverage. He looks directly at Stephen Hill (and if you youtube the video, he pumpfakes at him for no reason)



    Then looks away from the wide open guy:


    Ok, so he has something even more easy then?



    Nope, he threw an easy interception instead. It would've gone for a pick 6, if it wasn't for I believe Powell making a great recovery and chasing down the defender.

    That sequence pretty much sums up Sanchez.

  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by Win4ever View Post
    I think Sanchez's main problem is just decision making. He's just not quick enough to make decisions on a consistent basis, especially on checkdowns. It's almost as if he has a primary receiver on a play, and just hopes the guy gets open, instead of checking out other WRs on the play as well. I've seen him time and time again lock into a WR and just not pay any attention to anyone else.

    It's masked in college, because he had a great line, and an athletic WR corps, so he could wait until the guys were actually open. If you watch his highlights from college, a high number of passes are thrown with no one around the WR. It's not him throwing open the WR, there just isn't anyone around, and he's all but lobbing the ball up there almost.

    I'm not sure if he has the ability to be a roll out QB, because to do that on a somewhat consistent basis, you almost have to run a quasi read option offense for the defense to actually bite. And I'm not sure he would've held up with constant hits. Remember, this is a guy that took like 2 years or so and outside help, just to learn how to slide. They used to make a big deal about how he always slid head first, so I'm not sure how long he could've gone with roll outs on a consistent basis.





    He's just so slow with his decision making, that it's ridiculous. The SF game, I can atleast forgive to be honest, just because they had a great defense, and we just weren't going to score too much on them anyway. They were going to kill Sanchez one way or another, because they have a physical and fast defense. Sanchez's only skill is the pump fake, and by the second pump fake, the rushers were in his face. The Titans one was horrible, because they had like the worst defense in the league. I think they gave up the most points or something, and we still couldn't do anything. He just makes stupid turnovers and mistakes that kill the team. I understand other team's players making great plays, like the Patrick Peterson INT in the Cards game. That was just a sick play by Peterson, and you just tip your cap to him. But Sanchez's interceptions are rarely great plays by the other team, it's usually headed right towards the defender like the first Pats game, where he under-threw Hill, who was wide open in the end zone, and the CB who was ATLEAST a good 10-15 yards behind Hill ran under the pass and intercepted it.

    Anyway, borrowing from BR again, just wanted to give visual evidence of Sanchez's horrible decision making. Not sure if it was posted before, sorry if it's a repeat.

    Seattle Game, Stephen Hill WIDE OPEN in the end zone, defense in zone coverage. He looks directly at Stephen Hill (and if you youtube the video, he pumpfakes at him for no reason)



    Then looks away from the wide open guy:


    Ok, so he has something even more easy then?



    Nope, he threw an easy interception instead. It would've gone for a pick 6, if it wasn't for I believe Powell making a great recovery and chasing down the defender.

    That sequence pretty much sums up Sanchez.
    I will never forget that play ... +1 😱😭😢

  10. #70
    The kid has stud potential.

  11. #71
    Quote Originally Posted by Win4ever View Post
    I think Sanchez's main problem is just decision making. He's just not quick enough to make decisions on a consistent basis, especially on checkdowns. It's almost as if he has a primary receiver on a play, and just hopes the guy gets open, instead of checking out other WRs on the play as well. I've seen him time and time again lock into a WR and just not pay any attention to anyone else.

    It's masked in college, because he had a great line, and an athletic WR corps, so he could wait until the guys were actually open. If you watch his highlights from college, a high number of passes are thrown with no one around the WR. It's not him throwing open the WR, there just isn't anyone around, and he's all but lobbing the ball up there almost.

    I'm not sure if he has the ability to be a roll out QB, because to do that on a somewhat consistent basis, you almost have to run a quasi read option offense for the defense to actually bite. And I'm not sure he would've held up with constant hits. Remember, this is a guy that took like 2 years or so and outside help, just to learn how to slide. They used to make a big deal about how he always slid head first, so I'm not sure how long he could've gone with roll outs on a consistent basis.





    He's just so slow with his decision making, that it's ridiculous. The SF game, I can atleast forgive to be honest, just because they had a great defense, and we just weren't going to score too much on them anyway. They were going to kill Sanchez one way or another, because they have a physical and fast defense. Sanchez's only skill is the pump fake, and by the second pump fake, the rushers were in his face. The Titans one was horrible, because they had like the worst defense in the league. I think they gave up the most points or something, and we still couldn't do anything. He just makes stupid turnovers and mistakes that kill the team. I understand other team's players making great plays, like the Patrick Peterson INT in the Cards game. That was just a sick play by Peterson, and you just tip your cap to him. But Sanchez's interceptions are rarely great plays by the other team, it's usually headed right towards the defender like the first Pats game, where he under-threw Hill, who was wide open in the end zone, and the CB who was ATLEAST a good 10-15 yards behind Hill ran under the pass and intercepted it.

    Anyway, borrowing from BR again, just wanted to give visual evidence of Sanchez's horrible decision making. Not sure if it was posted before, sorry if it's a repeat.

    Seattle Game, Stephen Hill WIDE OPEN in the end zone, defense in zone coverage. He looks directly at Stephen Hill (and if you youtube the video, he pumpfakes at him for no reason)



    Then looks away from the wide open guy:


    Ok, so he has something even more easy then?



    Nope, he threw an easy interception instead. It would've gone for a pick 6, if it wasn't for I believe Powell making a great recovery and chasing down the defender.

    That sequence pretty much sums up Sanchez.
    I'm not defending Sanchez because he sucks but Stephen Hill had already dropped two passes that game and by that point his sole function was that of decoy. Defense didn't even bother covering him because it became obvious that although still on the field, that Sanchez/Sparano had removed Hill as a legitimate option. The offense from top (Sparano) to bottom (Sanchez/Hill, et al) was atrocious.

  12. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Win4ever View Post
    I think Sanchez's main problem is just decision making. He's just not quick enough to make decisions on a consistent basis, especially on checkdowns. It's almost as if he has a primary receiver on a play, and just hopes the guy gets open, instead of checking out other WRs on the play as well. I've seen him time and time again lock into a WR and just not pay any attention to anyone else.

    It's masked in college, because he had a great line, and an athletic WR corps, so he could wait until the guys were actually open. If you watch his highlights from college, a high number of passes are thrown with no one around the WR. It's not him throwing open the WR, there just isn't anyone around, and he's all but lobbing the ball up there almost.

    I'm not sure if he has the ability to be a roll out QB, because to do that on a somewhat consistent basis, you almost have to run a quasi read option offense for the defense to actually bite. And I'm not sure he would've held up with constant hits. Remember, this is a guy that took like 2 years or so and outside help, just to learn how to slide. They used to make a big deal about how he always slid head first, so I'm not sure how long he could've gone with roll outs on a consistent basis.





    He's just so slow with his decision making, that it's ridiculous. The SF game, I can atleast forgive to be honest, just because they had a great defense, and we just weren't going to score too much on them anyway. They were going to kill Sanchez one way or another, because they have a physical and fast defense. Sanchez's only skill is the pump fake, and by the second pump fake, the rushers were in his face. The Titans one was horrible, because they had like the worst defense in the league. I think they gave up the most points or something, and we still couldn't do anything. He just makes stupid turnovers and mistakes that kill the team. I understand other team's players making great plays, like the Patrick Peterson INT in the Cards game. That was just a sick play by Peterson, and you just tip your cap to him. But Sanchez's interceptions are rarely great plays by the other team, it's usually headed right towards the defender like the first Pats game, where he under-threw Hill, who was wide open in the end zone, and the CB who was ATLEAST a good 10-15 yards behind Hill ran under the pass and intercepted it.

    Anyway, borrowing from BR again, just wanted to give visual evidence of Sanchez's horrible decision making. Not sure if it was posted before, sorry if it's a repeat.

    Seattle Game, Stephen Hill WIDE OPEN in the end zone, defense in zone coverage. He looks directly at Stephen Hill (and if you youtube the video, he pumpfakes at him for no reason)



    Then looks away from the wide open guy:


    Ok, so he has something even more easy then?



    Nope, he threw an easy interception instead. It would've gone for a pick 6, if it wasn't for I believe Powell making a great recovery and chasing down the defender.

    That sequence pretty much sums up Sanchez.
    We're saying the same thing, only I think it's fear that keeps him from making a decision, and actually causes interceptions. Especially on check downs. From the beginning he needed to be unafraid to throw a pick, and learn from them. It's too late now, but he could have been better. He used to be better.

  13. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Nut View Post
    What gets me is that he doesn't seem to know the game situation. You're down 10-0, end of the 1st half vs SF and you're in FG range. You HAVE to protect the ball. You want the TD but you have to make sure you get at least the 3. He turns the ball over and the game has a completely different feel. Did the same in Tenn. Turnovers when the 3 would have helped and you come away with nothing and set up a score for the opponent. Just plain stupid.
    I'm telling you he does know the situation, and the more he tries to protect the ball the worse he is, and the more chance of interceptions. Down by 10 with 5 minutes to go he looks pretty good. Well he used to anyway. Telling him to be careful is a big mistake.

  14. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by Win4ever View Post
    I think Sanchez's main problem is just decision making. He's just not quick enough to make decisions on a consistent basis, especially on checkdowns. It's almost as if he has a primary receiver on a play, and just hopes the guy gets open, instead of checking out other WRs on the play as well. I've seen him time and time again lock into a WR and just not pay any attention to anyone else.

    It's masked in college, because he had a great line, and an athletic WR corps, so he could wait until the guys were actually open. If you watch his highlights from college, a high number of passes are thrown with no one around the WR. It's not him throwing open the WR, there just isn't anyone around, and he's all but lobbing the ball up there almost.

    I'm not sure if he has the ability to be a roll out QB, because to do that on a somewhat consistent basis, you almost have to run a quasi read option offense for the defense to actually bite. And I'm not sure he would've held up with constant hits. Remember, this is a guy that took like 2 years or so and outside help, just to learn how to slide. They used to make a big deal about how he always slid head first, so I'm not sure how long he could've gone with roll outs on a consistent basis.





    He's just so slow with his decision making, that it's ridiculous. The SF game, I can atleast forgive to be honest, just because they had a great defense, and we just weren't going to score too much on them anyway. They were going to kill Sanchez one way or another, because they have a physical and fast defense. Sanchez's only skill is the pump fake, and by the second pump fake, the rushers were in his face. The Titans one was horrible, because they had like the worst defense in the league. I think they gave up the most points or something, and we still couldn't do anything. He just makes stupid turnovers and mistakes that kill the team. I understand other team's players making great plays, like the Patrick Peterson INT in the Cards game. That was just a sick play by Peterson, and you just tip your cap to him. But Sanchez's interceptions are rarely great plays by the other team, it's usually headed right towards the defender like the first Pats game, where he under-threw Hill, who was wide open in the end zone, and the CB who was ATLEAST a good 10-15 yards behind Hill ran under the pass and intercepted it.

    Anyway, borrowing from BR again, just wanted to give visual evidence of Sanchez's horrible decision making. Not sure if it was posted before, sorry if it's a repeat.

    Seattle Game, Stephen Hill WIDE OPEN in the end zone, defense in zone coverage. He looks directly at Stephen Hill (and if you youtube the video, he pumpfakes at him for no reason)



    Then looks away from the wide open guy:


    Ok, so he has something even more easy then?



    Nope, he threw an easy interception instead. It would've gone for a pick 6, if it wasn't for I believe Powell making a great recovery and chasing down the defender.

    That sequence pretty much sums up Sanchez.
    I've actually mentioned this before, as bad as the butt fumble was, this play against the Seahawks was the single worst play by Sanchez this season. It sums up his total lack of confidence, his ability to make the right decision, and his inability to read everything going on. THere was really no excuse for not throwing a TD pass on that play.

  15. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by NY's stepchild View Post
    I'm telling you he does know the situation, and the more he tries to protect the ball the worse he is, and the more chance of interceptions. Down by 10 with 5 minutes to go he looks pretty good. Well he used to anyway. Telling him to be careful is a big mistake.
    in other words, he doesn't perform well under pressure, but when his team is down and he 'has less to lose', he's ok.

  16. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by Batmans A Scientist View Post
    I've actually mentioned this before, as bad as the butt fumble was, this play against the Seahawks was the single worst play by Sanchez this season. It sums up his total lack of confidence, his ability to make the right decision, and his inability to read everything going on. THere was really no excuse for not throwing a TD pass on that play.
    From week 6 back I can watch any JETS gave with Hill and Mark and see at least 2 plays like that. Hill should have had like an 800+ yard rookie year IMO but just wasnt thrown too when he got open. It was not shocking that that asshat McElroy was able to find him in the games he played. IMO McElroy is actually the better option over Mark he is just a prick and I dont like him at all. That hate I have for that guy is 2nd to no one.

  17. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dreamers View Post
    McElroy is actually the better option over Mark he is just a prick and I dont like him at all. That hate I have for that guy is 2nd to no one.
    lol...

    It's time to find a new hobby, son.

  18. #78
    Quote Originally Posted by Yankeejet22 View Post
    lol...

    It's time to find a new hobby, son.
    I know it is a small sample but in 1.25 games Elroy had over a 60 comp, a higher YPA, a better turn over ratio, and a higher QBR then Sanchez has ever posted in a year. He was just sacked 11 times. Not all of which where his fault I really think the OL wanted to send him a message. Hopefully he received it and they have all moved on. He has no arm at all I know but Mark doesnt throw the ball deep so what is the difference. Mark is not an NFL BU much less a starter. Really feel any viable BU could beat him out. Elroy has the talent of a viable BU like I said he is just a prick.

  19. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dreamers View Post
    He was just sacked 11 times. Not all of which where his fault I really think the OL wanted to send him a message.
    Like I said before, find a new hobby... you're horrible....

  20. #80
    Quote Originally Posted by Yankeejet22 View Post
    Like I said before, find a new hobby... you're horrible....
    Why am I horrible? It is a valid statement IMO. Guy bashed his OL and got bashed for it. Not sure what else you can say about that. It was obvious most of those sack where lack luster play on the OL.

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