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Thread: Riley Cooper, Eagle WR " I'll fight every N****R here"

  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Savage69 View Post
    You don't hear cracker,honky or anything else like that in country western songs yet the hated N word is in Rap music all the time.. No wonder young honkies think it's ok to use it..
    Classic "what's good fo rthe goose is NOT good for the gander"

    Next thing you know Al Sharpton will be at Eagles camp...

    I am sure it is a bit uneasy for him in that locker room today...

  2. #82
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    So what

    Vick doesn't even care

  3. #83
    Quote Originally Posted by Traitor Jay & the Woodies View Post
    Why do you "reluctantly" agree? IT's either offensive or it isn't. You either remove the word from the lexicon or you don't. When you accept "conditions" on context no one should be surprised that word doesn't go away. There is a generation of young white kids, raised on hip hop, who use this word freely - shockingly to older generations - who simply do not understand the true meaning. Whose fault is that?

    As always, common sense should always prevail, but this overdone outrage over use of a word - is absurd.
    So based on your logic, since ok to punch another man who pushed you, it should be equally ok for you to punch a girl that just pushed you?

    Society draws millions of arbitrary boundaries. Its ok to have sex with an 18 year old, but if she is 17 years +364 days old its statutoty rape in some states.

    What Riley did was not simply use the N word, he used the word in an awkward/threatening way on a stage at a concert. He is getting what he deserves and he appears to be man enough to realize that he is deserving of the outrage. Hopefully, he can recover from this because he appears to be a decent guy that a momentary lapse of judgment.

  4. #84
    Quote Originally Posted by BleedGreen314 View Post
    So what

    Vick doesn't even care
    Did you watch Vick's interview. He cared. He is being a good teammate and going to work through this with his teammate.

    Either way, its not really Vick's call to determine if its OK. I don't think he speaks for every black person.

  5. #85
    Quote Originally Posted by GreenWave View Post
    Yes, the outrage over Cooper is overdone. He didn't go on a Kramer rant (which I did find offensive), he got caught on camera using a word he shouldn't have in a drunken fit. I get it.

    What I don't get is why it's so hard for people to understand that there is a difference in certain words or phrases based on the "who" that's delivering them. For example:

    You're in an airport. You see some reject kid acting like an idiot at the baggage claim. You turn to your travel partner and you say something like, "I hate this freakin generation of American kids." Then you look to your left and you see a Muslim guy who's been watching the same kid. You hear him say, "I hate this freakin generation of American kids."

    If you're telling me that wouldn't bother you on some level, you're lying to yourself. But why would it bother you? He said the exact same thing you did, right? It would bother you because you know that you would never take action against this country, and your comment was just a comment. But you DON'T know how that Muslim guy actually feels about America. So you don't like hearing him say that.

    It's okay for you to call your own brother an *******. But if you go to a bar, and some drunk calls your brother an *******, are you going to say, "well yeah, I call him that all the time because he is one." Or are you going to defend him?

    I realize these aren't apples/apples comparisons. But try to keep in mind that when the word is used by someone who isn't black, it (often) triggers imagery of when that word was used while blacks were mistreated and viewed as subhuman.

    To put it simply, there's just no imagery generated when blacks use it, because black people never enslaved other black people in this country, hung them from trees, forced them to use separate bathrooms, or told them they were only 60% of a man.

    I agree with those who say we're better off just getting rid of the word altogether, and I can reluctantly agree that hip-hop is hurting the forward progression. But is there a reason why Cooper didn't choose to say "I will fight every a-hole in here?" Maybe that's worth examining - just my opinion.
    While I appreciate the thought and effort that went into this post, it is woefully inaccurate. To imply Riley's words had a different meaning because of the color of his skin is both ignorant and offensive to the reasoning ability of any minority that heard him.

    Are you telling me a rational person of ANY color thought Riley was using that word in its original context? That he potentially had the same hatred toward black people that a Muslim might toward American youth? If so, I cannot disagree more. No one cares what the guy meant or what the context was -- he's white so he's wrong. It's embarrassingly third-gradish, but that's the world we live in . . .

  6. #86
    Quote Originally Posted by BleedGreen314 View Post
    So what

    Vick doesn't even care
    What does Barkley think?

  7. #87
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    1992.....

    Quote Originally Posted by Savage69 View Post
    You don't hear cracker,honky or anything else like that in country western songs yet the hated N word is in Rap music all the time.. No wonder young honkies think it's ok to use it..
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6uZxh...717106DCE74A8B
    Last edited by Apache 51; 08-01-2013 at 03:26 PM.

  8. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by OCCH View Post
    While I appreciate the thought and effort that went into this post, it is woefully inaccurate. To imply Riley's words had a different meaning because of the color of his skin is both ignorant and offensive to the reasoning ability of any minority that heard him.

    Are you telling me a rational person of ANY color thought Riley was using that word in its original context? That he potentially had the same hatred toward black people that a Muslim might toward American youth? If so, I cannot disagree more. No one cares what the guy meant or what the context was -- he's white so he's wrong. It's embarrassingly third-gradish, but that's the world we live in . . .
    Zimmerman was only half white like Obama but still 100% wrong to some..

  9. #89
    Whitlock... a couple of insightful and pertinent columns

    http://msn.foxsports.com/nba/story/j...-sports-070913

    Jay-Z has no business in sports
    Jason Whitlock
    UPDATED JUL 10, 2013 4:52 AM ET


    Letís hope Kevin Durant and Robinson Cano learn a lesson from "Magna Carta Holy Grail", Jay-Zís latest CD.

    Letís hope they notice that the CEO of Roc Nation Sports did not seek 16 or eight bars from King James, Black Mamba, Melo or Birdman. You also wonít find CP3, The Truth or AK47 on any hooks on "Magna Carta". There are no beats from Captain Jack, Metta World Peace or Mr. Big Shot.

    Nope. When Jay-Z makes an album, when he does anything involving the music career that made him rich and famous, he only works with the best and brightest from the music industry. Only the most accomplished and skilled need apply.

    Letís hope Durant and Cano are paying attention, taking notes and analyzing their agentís brilliance.

    They should not be surprised that Justin Timberlakeís voice is the first you hear on "Magna Carta". J.T. is the holy grail of pop music. Nor should they be surprised to learn that Beyonce, Rick Ross, Timbaland and Pharrell Williams worked on "Magna Carta". They are the holy grail of R&B, gangsta rap and beats, respectively.

    Jay-Z is the holy grail of n*gga rap, the proper name for the genre of music that made Shawn Carter one of our presidentís best friends. Oh, Iím sure thatís upsetting and disconcerting for some of you to read. Youíd prefer I label the Jigga Man a gangsta rapper. He isnít. Heís a n*gga rapper. Listen to his music.

    On the opening track of "Magna Carta", a song dominated by Timberlakeís singing, Jay-Z pops in just enough to rattle off "n*gga" eight times. Heís perfected the art form of repeatedly saying the N-word over slickly produced musical beats while telling stories about fame, fortune, family and a former life of crime.

    Jay-Zís music is a "Cosby Show"-"New Jack City"-"MTV Cribs" mashup narrated by "Django Unchained" house slave Stephen.

    Jay-Zís success and his exalted status in the black community speak to the power of our self-hatred, delusional ignorance and unwillingness to learn from our history.

    Thereís always been a comfy bed, a pretty belly-warmer and a bright spotlight at the big house for the black performer willing to entertain the masses with n*gga tales.

    Jay-Z is not slang for Jesus. Hova is no oneís savior. Heís a new-millennium Stephen. Heís highly compensated to spin catchy fairy tales that promote the self-destructive notion that the path out of black American poverty and into the American Dream is through the drug trade and criminality.

    Our political system ó on the right and left ó is so bankrupt of ethics that President Obama has zero shame about embracing the king of black-denigration music.

    And neither do Kevin Durant and Robinson Cano.

    Theyíre kids who have swallowed mass-media propaganda. Theyíre no more or less gullible than the American adults who swallowed the propaganda about home ownership at the beginning of this century.

    Jay-Z is the cure for everything. Heís cracked the code. Of course, the king of rap music is the ideal candidate to represent black athletes. Itís really too bad Michael Jackson passed away before we realized musical geniuses could parlay their talents and expertise into other industries.

    The Gloved One and Hova couldíve combined to open a sports agency and a string of barbershops, beauty salons and soul-food kitchens.

    Or maybe Durant, Cano and other athletes will pick up "Magna Carta Holy Grail" and realize what Jay-Z wonít tell them: When youíre blessed with talent, itís best that you stay in your lane and align yourself with talented people in your field.

    Jay-Z isnít asking basketball or baseball players to help him create rap music. Heís paying musicians to do it. Universal Music Group and The Island Def Jam Music Group help promote and distribute Roc-A-Fella Records, not ESPN or FOX Sports.

    The marriage of Jay-Z to the sports world is idiotic.

    Selling athletic competition and selling music are two distinctly different disciplines. Sports are founded in traditional, mainstream American values. Music, particularly rap and rock, is founded in rebellion and anti-establishment values.

    Jay-Zís sensibilities do not comfortably co-exist with the sensibilities that best promote athletic culture. The NBAís headfirst embrace of hip-hop music is one of the main reasons the league has lost relevancy the last 15 years. Blaming it all on the aging and retirement of Michael Jordan and/or the Pistons-Pacers brawl at The Palace is intellectually lazy and David Stern-friendly propaganda.


    LeBron James is as compelling an athlete America has produced since Muhammad Ali. Jamesí rise is a far superior story to Michael Jordanís. James is Tiger Woods and Mike Tyson in one 6-foot-8, 250-pound, slam-dunking package.

    On symbolic, real and intangible levels, the NBAís values are more closely aligned with the rebellious and individualistic characteristics of music than the patriotic characteristics of sports. Thatís why LeBron doesnít connect the way Jordan did and does. Thatís why basketball canít compete with football despite basketball being the sport that every American boy or girl plays at least once in their lives. Everyone understands and can relate to basketball. It should rival football in popularity.

    It is not a coincidence that Jay-Z is having the most difficulty getting certified as an NFL agent. Pete Rozelle, Paul Tagliabue, Roger Goodell and the leagueís television partners have worked diligently to make football as American as mom and apple pie.

    Jay-Z has worked diligently to make n*gga rap as unwittingly self-destructive and seductive as possible.

    Despite its reliance on young African-American athletes, the NFL has made the wise business choice of keeping some significant distance between itself and the youth music culture enthusiastically consumed and followed by many of its young employees.

    Unless Durant and Cano plan to moonlight as rappers, Jay-Z has nothing of value to offer them or the sports world. His marketing genius and innovation are myths.

    Fiddler, in the TV miniseries "Roots", educated black folks on the rewards of bojangling 300 years ago. He and his banjo are still the holy grail of n*gga music.

    Jay-Z is his disciple.
    http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/w...d-learn-080113

    Let's all learn from Cooper's gaffe

    Jason Whitlock
    UPDATED AUG 1, 2013 3:05 PM ET


    We, the media, will blow this Riley Cooper teachable moment. Itís what we do when it comes to race. We look for good guys and bad guys, villains and heroes. We choose the politically correct path rather than the road to understanding.

    Riley Cooper, a receiver for the Philadelphia Eagles, did and said something very, very stupid and disgusting. Drunk and partying in a sea of whiteness, Cooper apparently lashed out at a black security guard and threatened to "fight every n****r here".

    A cellphone camera captured Cooperís ignorance. It took a month, but the blogosphere unearthed the video and broadcast it to the world. The Eagles reacted responsibly, fining Cooper and forcing him to confront his mistake publicly with the media and privately with his teammates.


    I donít expect the media to respond as responsibly. Too many of us will think the solution is for NFL commissioner Roger Goodell to suspend Riley Cooper. Too many of us will think Riley Cooper in no way reflects on all of us.

    Well, Iíve been young, drunk, filled with athletic testosterone and partying in a sea of blackness. Iím glad there were no cellphone cameras then. Iíve been middle-aged, drunk, filled with non-athletic cholesterol and partying in a sea of blackness. Iím glad no one recorded the foolish thoughts Iíve uttered when I assumed no one around me would be offended.

    Maybe most of the people working in the media are perfect, immune to impure, biased thoughts or actions. Iím not. And no one I know is. What happens with age and maturity is we get better at combatting our biases and keeping them from spilling out of our mouths. When we intellectually evolve, we get better at seeing the stupidity of our biases and not letting them dictate our actions.

    Iím extremely distrustful of anyone who claims theyíre free of biases. Theyíre dishonest or delusional.

    For the most part, Riley Cooper handled his apology flawlessly. He forthrightly expressed the proper remorse and humbly answered every question.

    ďThis is the lowest of lows,Ē Cooper said. ďThis is not the type of person I want to be portrayed as. This isnít the type of person I am. Iím extremely sorry.Ē

    Thereís no room for Cooper to be totally honest. The media ó social and legitimate ó wonít allow Cooper to be transparent. What was captured on tape is a reflection of what type of person Cooper is.

    Heís flawed. Heís a product of Americaís conflicted melting pot. That is not a knock on America. We have racial issues because weíre the most diverse nation on the planet. We have trouble working through those issues because dishonesty and simple-mindedness are rewarded.

    Like all of us, Riley Cooper is biased. He needs to admit that to himself so he can adequately combat his biases and be a force for positive change.

    I used to be proudly homophobic. I used the F-word regularly. In 1998, while sitting in the New England Patriots press box, I got in a back-and-forth exchange with Pats fans and cracked a ďjokeĒ that ended with me asking, ďDrew Bledsoe gay?Ē

    The ensuing controversy started the process of me recognizing and realizing the utter ignorance of my homophobia. I used to be offended when people analogized the struggle for gay equality with black peopleís struggle for equality. I now get it and understand their struggle benefits our struggle and the overall fight for fairness.


    I hope Cooper is allowed to evolve. I hope we donít demonize him to the point that he becomes John Rocker II and more entrenched in bigotry. I hope Cooper confronts who he is. He didnít threaten to fight every n****r because thereís no bigotry in his heart and mind. He did it because he has failed to deal with who he really is.

    Heís in the same denial most of us are in. Iím talking about all of us ó black, white, brown and yellow.

    I want to make one other point before I finish. Cooperís transgression isnít much of a locker-room issue for the Eagles. There are bigots of every color on sports teams. The beauty of sports is that teams force participants to put aside their biases and work together. Working together is different from liking or respecting each other.

    Cooper isnít a coach or executive with the power to hire and fire people based on his racial biases. Cooper is a player. Heís a 25-year-old kid with immature thoughts. His teammates will move on as long as he plays at a high level.

    Racial slurs fly on football fields somewhat regularly. Itís a violent game that brings out the worst in people. My junior season at Ball State, I played against a white Northern Illinois defensive tackle who N-bombed me most of the afternoon. I kept shouting at his mostly black defensive teammates about why they would tolerate such a flaming idiot. The next year, the same guy was the most courteous opponent I played against all season.

    Letís help Cooper evolve and mature. We might be surprised by the results.

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenWave View Post
    I knew that would be the point that would get commented on - I should have left it out. Personally I feel that hip-hop is given way too much credit for its influence, but I'm not going to win that argument. Those who decry it do make reasonable points that I just don't happen to agree with, that's all.

    My point was not to touch on the faux outrage that's going on with this incident. Those people up in arms about this are the fringe of society, whose opinions should, frankly, be discounted. That's why Cooper's teammates were so quick to forgive him - MOST people aren't outraged. Common sense, as you rightly said, should (and does) prevail here.

    My point was simply that there IS a difference between a white person using the word and a black person using the word. Just as there is a difference between you demeaning your own nationality or race and someone from another country or background insulting it. And I don't think that the death of hip-hop equals the death of that word, or the feelings that will go along with its usage by people who aren't black. Only time will do that.
    Agreed. Good post.

    Quote Originally Posted by revischrist View Post
    So based on your logic, since ok to punch another man who pushed you, it should be equally ok for you to punch a girl that just pushed you?

    Society draws millions of arbitrary boundaries. Its ok to have sex with an 18 year old, but if she is 17 years +364 days old its statutoty rape in some states.

    What Riley did was not simply use the N word, he used the word in an awkward/threatening way on a stage at a concert. He is getting what he deserves and he appears to be man enough to realize that he is deserving of the outrage. Hopefully, he can recover from this because he appears to be a decent guy that a momentary lapse of judgment.
    You're using a false equivalency. Words are not equal to physical assault or sex with a minor. I'm not even sure how you're making the connection, but it is completely misguided.

    Riley will deal with consequences of this lapse of judgement. Really the only thing he is truly guilty of. Wide receiver meetings, will certainly, be awkward going forward.

  11. #91
    Quote Originally Posted by OCCH View Post
    While I appreciate the thought and effort that went into this post, it is woefully inaccurate. To imply Riley's words had a different meaning because of the color of his skin is both ignorant and offensive to the reasoning ability of any minority that heard him.

    Are you telling me a rational person of ANY color thought Riley was using that word in its original context? That he potentially had the same hatred toward black people that a Muslim might toward American youth? If so, I cannot disagree more. No one cares what the guy meant or what the context was -- he's white so he's wrong. It's embarrassingly third-gradish, but that's the world we live in . . .
    I did not say that, and I don't think that either. I was trying to keep this simple and address the posts I quoted, that were asking why it's different for one side to use the word vs. the other.

    To imply that there's no difference in who says it, or that people are wrong to take more offense when one side says it vs. the other...that's the part I object to for the reasons stated.

  12. #92
    Quote Originally Posted by Traitor Jay & the Woodies View Post
    I had to read that twice.

    But to answer your questions:

    1. No, but it would help. The cultural impact of hip hop is undeniable. The words prevalence in rap continues its existence in the cultural lexicon. If it were not such a common term, it would disappear faster.

    2. I think the word is used so often and in so many contexts, it's not always "hateful", per se. In fact, it's use in hip hop is almost never hateful. Is it any wonder why young and ignorant white people use it?

    The whole "we can use it, but you cannot" mentality is absurd.
    My one contention is that the N word was part of our society before Rap and Hip Hop. The NWA and Dr Dre did not introduce the masses to the N word in the 90's. Does rap make it more main stream? Sure but The N words role in society was prominent in the 70's. Rap did that also?

    To clarify I am a 25 year old black man, I dont say it. I hate when my friends say. But there is a difference when a black man says it and a white man says it. I have jewish friends who say jewish specific slurs or slang terms that I would never in a million years think about uttering. Why is that so hard to grasp?
    Last edited by Revis; 08-01-2013 at 04:13 PM.

  13. #93

  14. #94
    Quote Originally Posted by OCCH View Post
    How is it a "hateful" word when it has taken on a completely different meaning to the people it was supposed to be hateful toward?

    Or do you think black artists mean it in a hateful and demeaning way when they say it? And if so, why is it only offensive when it comes out of certain mouths?
    I speak for myself, I don't hold rap artist who come from impoverished environments with very poor education as the barometers of what's acceptable. Right is right regardless how many idiots choose to do what they want
    Last edited by Revis; 08-01-2013 at 04:11 PM.

  15. #95
    Quote Originally Posted by Revis View Post
    My one contention is that the N word was part of our society before Rap and Hip Hop. The NWA and Dr Dre did not introduce the masses to the N word in the 90's. Does rap make it more main stream? Sure but The N words role in society was prominent in the 70's. Rap did that also?

    To clarify I am a 25 year old black man, I dont say it. I hate when my friends say. But there is a difference when a black man says it and a white man says it. I have jewish friends who say jewish specific slurs or slang terms that I would never in a million years think about uttering. Why is that so hard to grasp?
    +1 to all, especially the bold.

  16. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by Revis View Post
    My one contention is that the N word was part of our society before Rap and Hip Hop. The NWA and Dr Dre did not introduce the masses to the N word in the 90's. Does rap make it more main stream? Sure but The N words role in society was prominent in the 70's. Rap did that also?

    To clarify I am a 25 year old black man, I dont say it. I hate when my friends say. But there is a difference when a black man says it and a white man says it. I have jewish friends who say jewish specific slurs or slang terms that I would never in a million years think about uttering. Why is that so hard to grasp?
    You hear the N-word, faaaar more today than you ever did in the 1970s. Hip-hop culture and society's acceptance of the word's use in rap (and that art form's explosion into mainstream popularity) have everything to do with the word gaining momentum instead of disappearing. Ironically, THAT was the supposed intent by many who advocate it's use. To use the word so much that it loses it's meaning.

    Well, you can't have it both ways. Did it lose its meaning? I think in a lot of ways it has.

    Listen, I'm a 41 year old white guy who doesn't use the word in conversation nor would I tolerate my children using it. But I like Jay-Z and sometimes I let a few n's slip when it's playing in the car. I don't view that as a problem. People who do are hypocrites.

  17. #97
    Let's lighten the thread up a little bit:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGdCeMayUjk

  18. #98
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    Riley is stupid, probably a racist, but who cares. Anyone who uses it sounds like an idiot, because its an idiotic word. Doesn't matter what race you are. Expand your vocabulary.

    Much bigger issues in this world

  19. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRONX JET View Post
    Riley is stupid, probably a racist, but who cares. Anyone who uses it sounds like an idiot, because its an idiotic word. Doesn't matter what race you are. Expand your vocabulary.

    Much bigger issues in this world
    Right on my man! +100

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    Guess I was wrong. LeSean McCoy is pretty upset.

    Riley Cooper's teammates in Philadelphia have publicly supported the embattled Eagles wide receiver since Cooper's racially insensitive comment became public on Wednesday. But that support is not exactly unconditional.

    LeSean McCoy told NFL.com's Albert Breer on Thursday that he forgives Cooper, but it hurts because McCoy's "losing a friend ... I can't respect a guy like that."

    McCoy wondered aloud if Cooper's true colors came out. McCoy is just voicing how many players probably feel. That doesn't mean Cooper can't be a huge part of the team; every organization has differences among employees. McCoy just might not see Cooper in the same light.

    "I guess the real him came out that day," McCoy told Breer. "The cameras are off, you don‚€™t think nobody's watching or listening, and then you find out who they really are. And to hear how he really came off, that shows you what he's really all about."

    Jason Kelce, who was with Cooper at the time of his charged comment, said the wide receiver can be a knucklehead at times.

    "Anybody that knows (Cooper) knows he's not a racist ... but knows he can sometimes get a little out of control," Kelce said, via the Philadelphia Inquirer.

    Eagles coach Chip Kelly said Thursday it would take a while for the team to get past the issue, and that he was "appalled" by Cooper's comments. (Although Kelly noted Cooper was never at risk of getting released.) Still, Kelly had a very important choice to make Wednesday. After Cooper's comments went viral, Kelly had to choose a team leader to address the media on the issue and calm things down. It's telling that Kelly chose Michael Vick.

    As Philadelphia Magazine's Tim McManus notes, that selection says a lot about Vick's role as a team leader. He's a player who the team looks to in times like this. He has built up a lot of loyalty in the organization, something that Nick Foles can't match. Vick also has a history with controversial topics.

    "What if your son or daughter made a mistake of this fashion, how would you want people to proceed? I've been there before. It's a very delicate situation that we all understand. Somehow we've all got to find a way to get past it," Vick said Wednesday.

    Vick, not Kelly, first met the media on the matter. Vick has picked up his play on the field of late, and could be slightly in front of Foles in the battle to start at quarterback. His ability to handle every role required of a starting quarterback -- smoothing things over with his teammates and dealing with the media -- only can help Vick's chances.
    I hope for McCoy's sake he never has a misstep. It sucks being defined by one thing.

    This will just become a bigger a problem when the league expands the cameras into the locker rooms and into half time. Eventually the reports will get some of these players saying things about race, gender, sexuality, etc. I don't understand why we hold athletes to such high moral standards in this country. They are paid to play a game and perform well, they are not paid to be public policy makers. I think it all stems from the average person resenting the amount of money athletes make.

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