Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst ... 23456 LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 104

Thread: Charter Schools,

  1. #61
    Board Moderator
    Jets Insider VIP
    Charter JI Member

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    State Location Here
    Posts
    8,282
    Common Core is a joke, and a lot of parents opted their kids out of sitting for the test here in my district. But despite it's shortcomings, if it's a tool to break the destructive and debilitating status quo garbage of the UFT and the Michael Mulgrews of the world, that's a good thing.

  2. #62
    Copernicus:

    Here's an easy way to identify a coward who has no faith in his positions: When asked direct questions, he ignores them. Sound familiar?

    I'll repeat my question for you: Should people with a financial stake in education policy have a say in setting education policy?

  3. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by copernicus View Post
    Now I don't know whether or not these tests will establish anything. But when the scores are as abysmal as projected, they'll be used as a battering ram to trash working teachers. Why on earth didn't teachers prepare kids for the tests they had never seen? Why didn't they spend a little time going over the material that didn't exist?
    Who can spot the problem with this attitude?

  4. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by doggin94it View Post
    Who can spot the problem with this attitude?
    From another educator:

    NYSED/Regents decided to use the completely unrealistic NAEP benchmark as the alignment for these new state tests, so the scores are going to be even worse than anticipated.

    They quite literally rigged the scores to look abysmal.

    The fix is in - and strangely enough, the charter school-connected State Education commissioner King and the online for profit connected State Regents commissioner Tisch will push for charter schools and online for profit education as "solutions" to this "disaster" they created themselves.

    And of course the corporate media - from the hedge fund supported Gotham Schools to the Rupert Murdoch-owned Post and WSJ - will frame these scores as proof positive the system is a disaster and drastic, disruptive solutions are needed to fix the problem.

    They've got it all figured out:

    Create the problem yourself, publicize it in the media you either own or directly fund, have the editorial writers on your payroll call for the privatization solutions you want, have your funded astroturf groups with a dozen members give press conferences that concur with your editorial boards, have the politicians on your payroll jump on board the bandwagon and call for an education commission to redo the education system and - voila! - you have the blueprint for reform in NY State!

    With so many questioning the scoring and profit driven agenda that new school reform brings, how in the world can we allow this to possibly destroy so many hard working educator's careers?
    Last edited by copernicus; 08-07-2013 at 11:22 AM.

  5. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by copernicus View Post
    From another educator:

    NYSED/Regents decided to use the completely unrealistic NAEP benchmark as the alignment for these new state tests, so the scores are going to be even worse than anticipated.

    They quite literally rigged the scores to look abysmal.

    The fix is in - and strangely enough, the charter school-connected State Education commissioner King and the online for profit connected State Regents commissioner Tisch will push for charter schools and online for profit education as "solutions" to this "disaster" they created themselves.

    And of course the corporate media - from the hedge fund supported Gotham Schools to the Rupert Murdoch-owned Post and WSJ - will frame these scores as proof positive the system is a disaster and drastic, disruptive solutions are needed to fix the problem.

    They've got it all figured out:

    Create the problem yourself, publicize it in the media you either own or directly fund, have the editorial writers on your payroll call for the privatization solutions you want, have your funded astroturf groups with a dozen members give press conferences that concur with your editorial boards, have the politicians on your payroll jump on board the bandwagon and call for an education commission to redo the education system and - voila! - you have the blueprint for reform in NY State!
    LOL. Continue to ignore my question, you coward.

    And btw, true or false: Charter school students take the same Common Core tests and are graded on the same basis as public schools?

  6. #66
    Quote Originally Posted by copernicus View Post
    You want teachers to be treated like everyone else? Really? Like being able to use the bathroom when they need?Choose their own vacations? Not have to work every weekend? Leave the job totally at quitting time? And not be blamed for the recession by the people who caused it?
    You're ridiculous. My wife is a teacher, so I have a lot of sympathy for the criticisms coming from one extreme side, but you come from the other extreme.

    How did you spend your day last Friday? Were you up at 4 am to catch a 6 am flight to Ohio to meet with a customer all day, and fly back, getting home after 10 pm? And then spend part of the weekend catching up on email and reporting that is due? Because I and a lot of other private sector workers did just that. We're attached at the hip via email and cell, and don't just turn them off at 5 pm. We work weekends to catch up on things that don't get done during the week, or planning strategy for the week to come. Oh, and we have to plan vacations around other colleagues for coverage, and around team meetings and yearly kickoffs, so yeah, we don't get to just choose whenever we want for vacation.

    Now in all fairness, my wife's a newer teacher, and as well works most nights prepping and planning, never leaves the school right when the bell rings, gets in early, and does work on weekends planning, so to say teaching is just a 7-3 job is unfair as well....but to say the private sector is 9-5 M-F only is disingenuous or short sighted.

  7. #67
    Quote Originally Posted by doggin94it View Post
    Copernicus:

    Here's an easy way to identify a coward who has no faith in his positions: When asked direct questions, he ignores them. Sound familiar?

    I'll repeat my question for you: Should people with a financial stake in education policy have a say in setting education policy?
    Educational policy should not be made by corporations. Their agenda is to make profit, not educate the future. It is such a conflict of interest. Genius plan, create an unreachable goal so everyone fails to ensure that more testing materials can be sold.

    As far as charter's go. There are different rules for them and they are so unfair and ridiculous.

    Charter school's standardized grades do not count against them for the first THREE years of their existence. Basically anything goes. They are often housed inside already existing school buildings creating scheduling nightmares. My public school has a charter school that occupies the fourth floor. It is a HS, I am in a middle school. Our building has only ONE gym, auditorium, and cafeteria. There are no physical barriers that separate the schools. When criminal minded students want to commit crimes they simply walk freely into the other school where no one knows their name or identity creating a more unsafe environment. The charter high school has students that can be as old as 20 if they have been left back and the youngest in my school is eleven. With the documented problems of bullying presently this is a recipe for disaster. There have been times when special education boys in the high school are found in the girls bathrooms of those used by the middle school. Real safe huh? Yeah, it's all about the safety of children!

    Not everyone can go to a charter school. It flies in the face of one of the strongest philosophies that every students deserves a free education. Charter schools have a rigged lottery system, they hand pick the best students taking from the public school creating an almost a perfect situation for charters all the while taking away from the ps.

    Each year, there is a mass exodus of underperforming charter school students back to their zoned public school right before the state tests.

    Students who struggle both academically and/or behavior wise in charter schools get frightening letters that state if they do not transfer to their zoned ps they are in jeopardy of being left back.

    Charter schools make money for those connected to them period.
    Last edited by copernicus; 08-07-2013 at 12:09 PM.

  8. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by copernicus View Post
    Educational policy should not be made by corporations. Their agenda is to make profit, not educate the future. It is such a conflict of interest. Genius plan, create an unreachable goal so everyone fails to ensure that more testing materials can be sold.
    By your logic, the Teachers' Union should also be excluded from making education policy. Their agenda is to protect the members of their union. "It is such a conflict of interest."

    As far as charter's go. There are different rules for them and they are so unfair and ridiculous.

    Charter school's standardized grades do not count against them for the first THREE years of their existence.
    Irrelevant, given that:

    1) Many charter schools are well out of the first three years of their existence (so this complaint applies only to a small portion of charters); and

    2) Charter school scores will still be available to allow comparison of scores as against public school students. If the tests are "impossible to pass" and "designed to cause failures," then charter school students will have equal difficulty passing them - which makes the idea that the tests are a plot to make charter schools look good self-evidently false.


    Basically anything goes. They are often housed inside already existing school buildings creating scheduling nightmares. My public school has a charter school that occupies the fourth floor. It is a HS, I am in a middle school. Our building has only ONE gym, auditorium, and cafeteria. There are no physical barriers that separate the schools. When criminal minded students want to commit crimes they simply walk freely into the other school where no one knows their name or identity creating a more unsafe environment.
    Can you explain how this has anything at all to do with reasons to expect charter school students to do better on common core tests than public school students, such that the tests are structurally biased towards charters?

    Can you explain how the presence of "criminal minded students" at the charter squares with your oft repeated (but never supported) complaint that charter lotteries are rigged to funnel the "good kids" to the charters and leave public schools with the dregs?

    The charter high school has students that can be as old as 20 if they have been left back and the youngest in my school is eleven.
    Can you explain how the presence of "20 year old held-back students" at the charter squares with your oft repeated (but never supported) complaint that charter lotteries are rigged to funnel the "good kids" to the charters and leave public schools with the dregs?

    With the documented problems of bullying presently this is a recipe for disaster. There have been times when special education boys in the high school are found in the girls bathrooms of those used by the middle school. Real safe huh? Yeah, it's all about the safety of children!
    Can you explain how the presence of "special education boys" at the charter squares with your oft repeated (but never supported) complaint that charter lotteries are rigged to funnel the "good kids" to the charters and leave public schools with the dregs?

    And can you explain how any of this rant ties into the testing issue in any way shape or form?

    Not everyone can go to a charter school. It flies in the face of one of the strongest philosophies that every students deserves a free education. Charter schools have a rigged lottery system, they hand pick the best students taking from the public school creating an almost a perfect situation for charters all the while taking away from the ps.
    LOL. Here it is again. So, apparently, "criminal minded" students, "20 year olds who have been held back" and "special education kids" are the hand-picked "best students" in the system?

    Do you even read the things you write?

    Each year, there is a mass exodus of underperforming charter school students back to their zoned public school right before the state tests.
    1) Documentation?
    2) Again, how do you square your claims of "rigged lotteries" with "masses of underperforming charter school students"? Apparently, the folks "rigging the lotteries" are pretty terrible at cheating . . . and if the lottery system is delivering masses of underperforming students to the charter schools, how can you with a straight face claim that the "rigging" harms the public schools? Apparently, the lotteries are moving masses of underperforming students out of the public school system.

    In fact:

    Is anyone given preference in the lottery?Yes. The law requires charter schools to give preference to returning students, siblings of students already enrolled in the school and students who reside in the Community School District in which the charter school is located. Charter schools are also permitted to give preferences for students at-risk of academic failure. As a result, some schools give preferences for students who are English Language Learners, while other schools give preferences for students who are eligible for free or reduced price lunch. Still others have preferences for students who did not score at the proficient level on the state tests.

    http://www.nyccharterschools.org/enrollment-faq#2

    RIGGED!!!

    Students who struggle both academically and/or behavior wise in charter schools get frightening letters that state if they do not transfer to their zoned ps they are in jeopardy of being left back.
    Shouldn't students who don't have the academic skills for promotion be held back? And if there are these legions of letters going out, shouldn't one be available on the internet somewhere? Why isn't a google search turning them up? Feel free to point me to any evidence backing up your claims.

    Charter schools make money for those connected to them period.
    Odd - given that the majority of Charter schools are not for profits.
    Last edited by doggin94it; 08-07-2013 at 12:36 PM.

  9. #69
    A charter school just approved for the Upper West Side of Manhattan, to be run by the Success Charter Network of schools headed by Eva S. Moskowitz, will give preference to English-language learners, according to The New York Times. The school will also give preference to students zoned to attend schools that received a D or F in student performance on their public report cards, the Times reports.
    http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/learn...ol_will_g.html

    Damn those rigged lotteries taking all the good students and none of the ELLs!


    And the school's evil for-profit leader:

    Our Principal:

    Carolyn Roby, Leader of Success Academy Upper West

    Before joining Success Academy Charter Schools, Carolyn worked for Teach for America as a second and third grade teacher at an elementary school located in the South Bronx. Following TFA, she became a founding second grade teacher and leadership resident at Success Academy Harlem 1. Carolyn graduated with a degree in psychology from Harvard and has a Master’s in teaching from Pace University.


    Clearly, she's in it for the Benjamins. Everyone knows if you want the big bucks, get a Masters in teaching from Pace and join Teach for America. The $$ just roll in after that.

    And they clearly aren't serving the children well:

    There are a lot of families zoned for 87 and 199 that chose it over those schools. We were zoned for 166's gen ed. I'd applied on a whim and got a spot and ultimately (after a long period of indecision) decided to take the spot and move dc back to zoned if we didn't like it. We love it. Dd is thriving. She'd hated school and everyone had concerns about her academic progress in pre-K, but once she was there we realized we were in a place that they actually knew what they were doing. For the first time, she became proud of herself at school (the behavior awards went a long way even before she was on target academically). The level of work she is doing in 2nd grade is beyond our expectations and I think quite accelerated. The school is not without its quirks though - the long days with a 1/2 day on Wednesday, and the school calendar (starting school in August and getting out early June) drives me a bit bonkers. The homework isn't much at all (except the summer homework gets old fast). At the same time, being in a school where they constantly tweak things to make them work better (like teaching math at a child's level in small groups) is amazing. And little things that make it special -- DD was recently absent one day (just one!) with a cold. The principal, who greets every child at the door each morning, welcomed her back and asked how she felt the next day. Her teacher just met with me on a Friday after school at 4:45 to review her math assessment - she got 82%, but the teacher thought she could do better and wanted to show me the areas of weakness and gave me suggestions to work on at home and sent home some worksheets we could do if we wanted. That and science and chess...field trips to take advantage of NYC. We feel very lucky dd is there.
    http://www.urbanbaby.com/topics/55087682

  10. #70
    Jets Insider VIP
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    18,566
    Quote Originally Posted by Brooklyn Jet View Post
    You're ridiculous. My wife is a teacher, so I have a lot of sympathy for the criticisms coming from one extreme side, but you come from the other extreme.

    How did you spend your day last Friday? Were you up at 4 am to catch a 6 am flight to Ohio to meet with a customer all day, and fly back, getting home after 10 pm? And then spend part of the weekend catching up on email and reporting that is due? Because I and a lot of other private sector workers did just that. We're attached at the hip via email and cell, and don't just turn them off at 5 pm. We work weekends to catch up on things that don't get done during the week, or planning strategy for the week to come. Oh, and we have to plan vacations around other colleagues for coverage, and around team meetings and yearly kickoffs, so yeah, we don't get to just choose whenever we want for vacation.

    Now in all fairness, my wife's a newer teacher, and as well works most nights prepping and planning, never leaves the school right when the bell rings, gets in early, and does work on weekends planning, so to say teaching is just a 7-3 job is unfair as well....but to say the private sector is 9-5 M-F only is disingenuous or short sighted.

    BRAVO!!!!!!

  11. #71
    Jets Insider VIP
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    13,564
    The level of ownage is strong in this one.

    Take it easy, doggin. This isn't even a fair fight.

  12. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by JetPotato View Post
    The level of ownage is strong in this one.

    Take it easy, doggin. This isn't even a fair fight.
    So the results are in and up 70% of school kids in NYC are not proficient in math and English. 70%!? if I gave an exam and 70% of my students failed their would be no denying that the test was too difficult and my administrators would suggest that I change the test and they would be correct in doing so.

    Standardized testing 2013 style, a continued demoralization of students and teachers across the nation.

    Should be real good for kids self esteem issues.

    Keep selling those test prep materials!

    What a colossal waste of tax payers money going right into the pockets of the elite.

    All that money could be going towards reducing class size, athletics, playing fields, clubs, and classroom

    All across the nation, teachers are being asked to implement policies which violate their conscience, their professional training, their best practices and common sense, with severe penalties if they resist. This is a policy nightmare of epic proportions. It has to be described as such, attacked as such, and ultimately resisted as such. Fighting Test Based School Reform is one of the great moral imperatives of our time. It destroys careers, it destroys lives, it erases the best features of childhood.
    Last edited by copernicus; 08-07-2013 at 11:27 PM.

  13. #73
    Quote Originally Posted by copernicus View Post
    So the results are in and up 70% of school kids in NYC are not proficient in math and English. 70%!?
    Who knew the abject failure of your profession would be used as an argument that you should have no competition and more pay, eh?

    if I gave an exam and 70% of my students failed their would be no denying that the test was too difficult
    Or that you'd done an exceedingly poor job of preparing and educating them on it's material.

    Should be real good for kids self esteem issues.
    Education > Esteem.

    All across the nation, teachers are being asked to implement policies which violate their conscience, their professional training, their best practices and common sense, with severe penalties if they resist. This is a policy nightmare of epic proportions. It has to be described as such, attacked as such, and ultimately resisted as such. Fighting Test Based School Reform is one of the great moral imperatives of our time. It destroys careers, it destroys lives, it erases the best features of childhood.
    Wow. Extremism is never pretty, but wow.

  14. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by copernicus View Post
    So the results are in and up 70% of school kids in NYC are not proficient in math and English. 70%!? if I gave an exam and 70% of my students failed their would be no denying that the test was too difficult and my administrators would suggest that I change the test and they would be correct in doing so.
    And this is an example of exactly the type of results oriented thinking that makes clear you (and folks like you) ought to have no business making education policy.

    If 70% of children fail a test, there are actually two options:

    1) The test was too hard;
    2) The children were not educated correctly.

    The only way to know is to review the test and compare it to expectations.

    If you are giving seventh graders a test that 70% fail, and the test is on basic multiplication, addition, and subtraction you would expect a seventh grader to know, then the issue is with the education. If the test is on calculus, then the issue is with the test.

    Standardized testing 2013 style, a continued demoralization of students and teachers across the nation.

    Should be real good for kids self esteem issues.
    Here's a thought - perhaps self esteem issues should be a secondary educational consideration to . . . you know . . . educating.

    47% of people in Detroit are functional illiterates. http://www.detroitliteracy.org/faq.htm If you gave them a literacy test, at least 47% would fail. Judging by your post above, your reaction would be that the test was "too hard". That's not the attitude of a teacher interested in educating for success - that's the attitude of a teacher interested in being declared a success no matter how they educate.

    And the gamesmanship you say your administrators would engage in to meet that interest is exactly the argument for standardized testing. Thank you for making it.

  15. #75
    BTW, the Charter results are in, too.

    From Politico:

    Just 23 percent of charter students scored proficient in language arts, compared with 31 percent in public schools overall. That’s a greater gap than had shown up in last year’s exams.


    In math, charter schools beat the public school average in each of the past two years — but not this year. On the new tests, just 31 percent of charter students scored proficient, the same as in public schools overall.
    In other words, your conspiracy theory that Common Core tests are designed to make charters look good and public schools bad? Idiotic and proven nonsense.

    That said:


    Results were mixed at some of New York City’s most highly touted charter schools, often acclaimed as “miracle” schools because in years past, so many of their mostly poor and minority students aced the state’s proficiency tests.
    The flourishing Success Academies network of charter schools continued to post outstanding results on the new exams, especially in math. In one of its schools in the Bronx, for instance, an astonishing 90 percent of third graders passed the math test, and 68 percent passed language arts. Both results far exceeded the citywide average of a 33 percent pass rate for math and 28 percent for language arts.


    Eva Moskowitz, the founder of Success Academies, said she hopes the scores put to rest a common criticism that charter schools drill endlessly for fill-in-the-bubble multiple choice, but don’t nurture higher-order thinking skills. The new tests were designed to assess those more advanced skills — and her students still flourished. “Our emphasis has always been on critical thinking, high standards, the whole child — and a ton of elbow grease,” Moskowitz said.


    Yet other much-celebrated charter networks did not do nearly as well.


    The Democracy Prep chain posted uneven results, with particularly poor scores in sixth grade. In its Harlem charter, fewer than 4 percent of sixth graders passed the language arts exam, and fewer than 12 percent passed math. Its best results came at the eighth grade level, but even then the pass rate on both tests was under 33 percent — better than the citywide average of about 26 percent, but not a quantum leap above other public schools.


    Democracy Prep officials didn’t respond to a request for comment.


    The highly touted KIPP network also stumbled, with proficiency rates well below the city average for several grades and subjects. At KIPP Star College Prep, just 11 percent of fifth graders were proficient in math and just 16 percent passed the reading test. Seventh grade was another weak point, with 11 percent proficient in language arts and 14 percent in math. KIPP also did not respond to a request for comment.


    The poor results for KIPP, Democracy Prep and other renowned charters suggest that “we have to be more careful about claims of miracle schools,” said Michael Petrilli, an education analyst at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute.

    While many educators and politicians praised New York for demanding more of its students, some critics accused officials of raising the bar too high, too fast — without any proof that the new tests would, in fact, help children succeed in the global economy.


    http://www.politico.com/story/2013/0...#ixzz2bNEBXLsh

    Of course, as Petrilli correctly pointed out

    For all the attention on the proficiency rates, Petrilli cautioned that they are “a terrible metric to use for measuring school quality” because they generally reflect school demographics, with low-income students coming in with weaker skills and having farther to go to reach proficiency. “What you want to look at is progress over time — how much closer are these schools getting students toward college and career readiness,” Petrilli said. “And we won’t know that until next year.”
    But over time, we will be better able to identify which approaches generate better results - and which generate worse results - and attempt to disseminate and apply lessons learned in order to better schooling for everyone.

    I guess that's not a goal to be striven for, though . . .

  16. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by doggin94it View Post
    BTW, the Charter results are in, too.

    From Politico:



    In other words, your conspiracy theory that Common Core tests are designed to make charters look good and public schools bad? Idiotic and proven nonsense.

    That said:




    http://www.politico.com/story/2013/0...#ixzz2bNEBXLsh

    Of course, as Petrilli correctly pointed out



    But over time, we will be better able to identify which approaches generate better results - and which generate worse results - and attempt to disseminate and apply lessons learned in order to better schooling for everyone.

    I guess that's not a goal to be striven for, though . . .
    This is all said and good if there was proof (data) that this actually works. There is so much evidence that big business with the help of politicians are making money off the backs of school kids through Common Core and testing.

    Everything I do in recent years has to do with data. I can't breathe in the classroom if I don't have the data to back it up. Yet the highest standards are judged without any data whatsoever that Commmon Core even slightly works.

    Get ready for the onslaught of excuses as to why all Americans should be drinking the Common Core Kool Aid over the next few days inflight of the dreadful scores. There is simply too much money to be made at the expense of children to admit how wrong it is to put high stake testing in front of everything else when it comes to children.

  17. #77
    Board Moderator
    Jets Insider VIP
    Charter JI Member

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    State Location Here
    Posts
    8,282
    Quote Originally Posted by copernicus View Post
    TThere is simply too much money to be made at the expense of union teachers to admit how wrong it is to put high stake testing in front of everything else when it comes to union teachers.
    Fixed

  18. #78
    Quote Originally Posted by shakin318 View Post
    Fixed
    It's a lost cause mate. On this issue, you may as well be trying to convince Bin Laden that Islam is wrong, violence is wrong, and that America is great.

    It's never going to happen. If Doggin's absolute smashing of Coper's Union-fed rhetoric didn't even sink in, at all, nothing ever will.

    Some folks are simply dedicated true believers, extremists, fundamentalists, and they were either convinced, or decided, long ago that nothign would ever change their minds from what they believe so deeply to be true.

    What scares me is that this guy is teaching our next generation, and I think it's pretty clear that the insanity and bias exposed here is most certainly going to get included in the classroom he runs as well.

    And it's doubtful he's the only teacher this deeply into union fundamentalism.

    So you parents out there, you best be able to counter the indoctrination guys like Coper are surely injecting into your kids.

  19. #79
    Jets Insider VIP
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    13,564
    Quote Originally Posted by Churchill View Post
    It's a lost cause mate. On this issue, you may as well be trying to convince Bin Laden that Islam is wrong, violence is wrong, and that America is great.

    It's never going to happen. If Doggin's absolute smashing of Coper's Union-fed rhetoric didn't even sink in, at all, nothing ever will.

    Some folks are simply dedicated true believers, extremists, fundamentalists, and they were either convinced, or decided, long ago that nothign would ever change their minds from what they believe so deeply to be true.

    What scares me is that this guy is teaching our next generation, and I think it's pretty clear that the insanity and bias exposed here is most certainly going to get included in the classroom he runs as well.

    And it's doubtful he's the only teacher this deeply into union fundamentalism.

    So you parents out there, you best be able to counter the indoctrination guys like Coper are surely injecting into your kids.
    +1 - I have two young kids not yet of school age, and as I said earlier in the thread, this kind of (lack of) thinking is absolutely scary. This thread has me actually thinking a lot about their future, and if I need to consider homeschooling as an option. Most teachers I know would be ashamed of how they are being represented here, but I couldn't bare to expose my children to this from even one who is supposed to assist with growing their minds.

  20. #80
    Quote Originally Posted by Churchill View Post
    It's a lost cause mate. On this issue, you may as well be trying to convince Bin Laden that Islam is wrong, violence is wrong, and that America is great.

    It's never going to happen. If Doggin's absolute smashing of Coper's Union-fed rhetoric didn't even sink in, at all, nothing ever will.

    Some folks are simply dedicated true believers, extremists, fundamentalists, and they were either convinced, or decided, long ago that nothign would ever change their minds from what they believe so deeply to be true.

    What scares me is that this guy is teaching our next generation, and I think it's pretty clear that the insanity and bias exposed here is most certainly going to get included in the classroom he runs as well.

    And it's doubtful he's the only teacher this deeply into union fundamentalism.

    So you parents out there, you best be able to counter the indoctrination guys like Coper are surely injecting into your kids.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/...icle-1.1420868

    Parent: Bloomberg's obsession with state tests should not replace real teaching, next mayor must make change


    Zakiyah Ansari, parent and spokeswoman for New Yorkers for Great Public Schools, says parents were sold empty promises of progress with Bloomberg's testing obsession

    I will never forget my son sitting at the side of my bed at 6 a.m. on the first day of the state exams with his head down in his hands, worried sick as to whether he would pass the tests.


    Continually throughout those seemingly everlasting two weeks, I reassured him that these tests would not define how smart he is, or how successful he will be in life.


    The testing mania that has soared under Mayor Bloomberg deeply hurt my son. And it angered me, making me sick to my stomach, leaving me wondering: How did this obsession with testing replace real teaching and learning?


    That same feeling came back Wednesday when the test scores were announced, as I found out that in the city’s most struggling districts, 90% of students are not meeting state reading and writing standards.


    As parents, we have higher standards for our children than anyone else, but we have been sold empty promises of progress with Bloomberg’s testing obsession. And Wednesday, our kids were the ones who paid the price.


    After a decade of teaching to the test and using the scores to punish students, teachers and schools, we are worse off, not better off.


    The next mayor must focus on getting us out of this mess. He or she must ensure that all students finally get a rich, challenging and diverse curriculum, and the social and emotional support they need to succeed. Teachers must also be supported and encouraged, and families and communities must be respected as real partners.


    Together, we can move forward and improve our public education system so that every neighborhood school is truly a great school.


    Zakiyah Ansari is a parent leader and spokeswoman for New Yorkers for Great Public Schools.






    Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/...#ixzz2bPBlOXwW

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Follow Us