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Thread: Breaking Bad

  1. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Dierking View Post
    Oh, and the Sopranos and the Wire were completely realistic?

    You are thinking about this too hard.
    I think everyone in this thread is probably "thinking about this too hard."

    But to answer your question, yes. BB is too contrived, intentionally so, to feel as real as Sopranos and The Wire. Everything in BB means something. Every single decision has a consequence and sets off a chain reaction. It's one of the overarching themes of the show. It's also why it's pulp.

    The Sopranos was messy. Things happened without explanation, without resolution. Just like life.

  2. #182
    If Walt didn't plan that call, knowing the Cops were listening, why did he break his phone immediately after?

    He knew what he was doing. Right now I have no clue what he was doing. haha

    But we will find out!

  3. #183
    Breaking Bad is a FAR better show than Sopranos.

    How are people even debating this?! And MAD MEN?! LMAO... WOW!!!

    The Wire was great and probably the most realistic and accurate show on TV. The end of BB will decide which was really better of those two.

    There's a reason BB is WIDELY acknowledged by it's peers as the greatest show in the history of tv.

  4. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hitman Harris View Post
    If Walt didn't plan that call, knowing the Cops were listening, why did he break his phone immediately after?

    He knew what he was doing. Right now I have no clue what he was doing. haha

    But we will find out!
    good call

  5. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hitman Harris View Post
    Breaking Bad is a FAR better show than Sopranos.

    How are people even debating this?! And MAD MEN?! LMAO... WOW!!!

    The Wire was great and probably the most realistic and accurate show on TV. The end of BB will decide which was really better of those two.

    There's a reason BB is WIDELY acknowledged by it's peers as the greatest show in the history of tv.
    The greatest show in the history of tv doesn't have terrible actors/characters in it like RJ Mitte/Walt JR.

    Where is any critic calling BB the best show in the history of TV? That is hysterical.

    Again, like I said try rewatching BB from the start like I did... Its not anywhere as close to as good as the first time. The Sopranos and The Wire get better over time because you still pick up things, see how the characters develop etc. Breaking Bad is a great linear comic book type show. But thats what it is, no real development, no alternate stories, just Walt and his Meth game. Great great show, nothing close to the Sopranos or The Wire.

  6. #186
    Quote Originally Posted by Ruby2 View Post
    The greatest show in the history of tv doesn't have terrible actors/characters in it like RJ Mitte/Walt JR.

    Where is any critic calling BB the best show in the history of TV? That is hysterical.

    Again, like I said try rewatching BB from the start like I did... Its not anywhere as close to as good as the first time. The Sopranos and The Wire get better over time because you still pick up things, see how the characters develop etc. Breaking Bad is a great linear comic book type show. But thats what it is, no real development, no alternate stories, just Walt and his Meth game. Great great show, nothing close to the Sopranos or The Wire.
    AJ from the Sopranos didn't exactly turn in a Haley Joel Osment from 6th Sense type performance.. On that note Meadow isn't exactly Dakota Fanning either.

    RJ Mitte really has CP and isn't a focal point of the show. What do you want from the kid. Have a heart.

    And dozens of critics are calling it the best of all time. You're just not looking in the right places.

  7. #187
    Quote Originally Posted by Ruby2 View Post
    The greatest show in the history of tv doesn't have terrible actors/characters in it like RJ Mitte/Walt JR.

    Where is any critic calling BB the best show in the history of TV? That is hysterical.
    LoL.. I know you hate Jr... I was thinking of that breakfast post in this when he went nuts after finding out about papa.

    And there are many...MANY actors and critics that say that. Their words, not mine.

    And no. NO link. You can find it yourself. They have a thing now called google. It shouldn't be hard. At all.


  8. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pac2566 View Post
    AJ from the Sopranos didn't exactly turn in a Haley Joel Osment from 6th Sense type performance.. On that note Meadow isn't exactly Dakota Fanning either.

    RJ Mitte really has CP and isn't a focal point of the show. What do you want from the kid. Have a heart.

    And dozens of critics are calling it the best of all time. You're just not looking in the right places.
    Fair points about AJ, Robert Iller was a pretty decent actor in my opinion, but his character was pretty brutal, I will give you that. I also ended up hating Meadow as well so maybe you got something there.

    I know Mitte has a real disability and im glad he has found success even with it. That still doesnt change the fact that his character is useless and ridiculously annoying.

  9. #189
    Quote Originally Posted by Ruby2 View Post
    The greatest show in the history of tv doesn't have terrible actors/characters in it like RJ Mitte/Walt JR.

    Where is any critic calling BB the best show in the history of TV? That is hysterical.

    Again, like I said try rewatching BB from the start like I did... Its not anywhere as close to as good as the first time. The Sopranos and The Wire get better over time because you still pick up things, see how the characters develop etc. Breaking Bad is a great linear comic book type show. But thats what it is, no real development, no alternate stories, just Walt and his Meth game. Great great show, nothing close to the Sopranos or The Wire.
    Wrong ... BB makes the Sapranos seem like a student project... The directing alone makes it light years beyond anything ever aired on TV.

  10. #190
    Quote Originally Posted by Ruby2 View Post
    Where is any critic calling BB the best show in the history of TV? That is hysterical.
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/allenstj...hat-matters/2/


    Why 'Breaking Bad' Is The Best Show Ever And Why That Matters

    Twenty three minutes into Episode 514, entitled “Ozymandias” after a Shelley poem, Breaking Bad made television history. Except that most fans didn’t notice. They were instead ready to cry, scream, vomit, or hurl a waffle iron at the plasma TV, or some combination of the above.

    Sometime around that first commercial break, Breaking Bad broke away from the pack and staked its claim to the title of television’s Best Show Ever.

    Over the course of five years, Vince Gilligan and his friends have constructed a world piece by piece, with attention to detail worthy of a Faberge egg. They created a compelling protagonist, a deeply flawed yet charismatic genius. They built a business at which he had savant-like skills, and depicted the family that often drove him crazy. Then blurred lines between the two. And in that way created a life for Walter White that many of us can relate to.

    But other great and groundbreaking TV dramas had done something similar, most notably David Chase’s The Sopranos, David Simon’s The Wire, and David Milch’s Deadwood.

    But Breaking Bad did something those iconic shows didn’t do. Showrunner Vince Gilligan set his protagonist in motion. Television had always been about a kind of inertia. After every episode of M*A*S*H or The Rockford Files there’d be a cosmic reset button that would allow the characters to return to exactly where they started at the beginning of the episode. That’s how you can make the Korean War last eleven years.

    And as that first generation of shows from television’s post-millennial Golden Era threw off so many of the shackles of convention inherent in the medium, they kept this one.

    Tony Soprano was a man who didn’t change, couldn’t change. Jimmy McNulty, Stringer Bell and other characters of The Wire fought hard for change—changing themselves and changing the system—but Simon’s message was that the drug/cop/court/prison/politics system in a fictionalized Baltimore was, tragically, too big and too strong to be taken down by a few angry men and women.

    Vince Gilligan started Breaking Bad with no such constraints. Whereas Tony Soprano spent seven seasons running errands around North Jersey, Walter White embarked on an epic journey, tracing an arc reserved for iconic characters of literature and cinema like Jay Gatsby and Michael Corleone.

    As he morphed Mr. Chips into Scarface, Gilligan wrote his own version of The Great American Novel. On Steroids.

    Part of Breaking Bad’s grandeur stems from the medium itself. Watching The Godfather Part I and Part II takes about six and a half hours. You can read The Great Gatsby in roughly the same amount of time.

    When it’s over, Breaking Bad will span 62 episodes. We’ll have spent almost ten times as much time with Walt and Jesse and Skyler as we did with Gatsby and Daisy or Michael Corleone and Tom Hagen. We know Walter White in a way that few great characters have ever been known, coming to that knowledge organically, over time.

    But we spent that same kind of time with Tony Soprano and McNulty. Breaking Bad differs from those shows–and surpasses them–in one important way. This is a story that’s moving toward an ending.

    The ending of The Sopranos, whether you loved it or hated it, was largely a non-ending. It was designed to make us think about the show and the act of watching it, as much as it made us think about Tony Soprano. The last season of The Wire, despite a number of resonant, even heartbreaking moments featuring Michael, Omar, and Bubbles, was simply not up to the standards of the four seasons that came before. Deadwood didn’t have a proper series finale at all. For all their cardinal virtues, those other contenders for the Best Show Ever left us feeling somewhat unsatisfied.

    Breaking Bad, on the other hand, is sticking the landing. Last week Gilligan teased us with a vision of how Breaking Bad might have ended if it were a 1970s cop show, with the click of handcuffs and a vindicated cop placing a triumphant phone call to his pretty, relieved wife.

    Having taken us on that detour, Gilligan pulls back from brink and begins an ending that’s majestic and horrible and completely of a piece with the 60 hours that came before. As Hank faced death last night and Walt unleashed his monstrous, destructive rage (setting in motion, as it always does, a torrent of suffering to come) these gut-wrenching moments were bought and paid for.

    “You’re the smartest guy I ever met,” Hank told Walt as Uncle Jack pointed a gun at his head. “And you’re too stupid to see. He made up his mind 10 minutes ago.”

    It’s a moment that can proudly stand beside the killing of Big ***** on The Sopranos, or the execution of Stringer Bell on The Wire. But unlike those great moments, Breaking Bad has built toward Hank’s death, and whatever comes next.

    The best moments of Ozymandias, directed by Rian Johnson of Looper fame, are filled with nuance and bits of craftsmanship that can be appreciated on the second and third—and tenth—viewings.

    But the first time through, the episode delivers a series of gut punches. Jesse. Junior. Marie. Skyler. One by one, each of the characters we care about have had their lives systematically torn apart.

    “Where’s Hank?” Skyler screams into the phone at Walt at the end of the episode echoing the classic line, “Where’s Wallace?” from Season One of The Wire. It’s a chilling moment taken purely on its own, but viewed as a homage, one that speaks to Breaking Bad’s ambition. The final season has been filled with small but telling references to The Wire and The Sopranos.

    The episode ends with Walt returning Holly to Skyler–inadvertently placing her squarely in the path of whatever danger is poised to come knocking at the White Family’s door.*

    (Dear Vince Gilligan: “Kids love fire trucks. Can’t Holly stay at the fire house for a while? Until she’s, like, 21? ”)

    It’s possible that with two hours left Vince Gilligan will flinch. But I get the sense that like Uncle Jack, he’s already made up his mind. And we’ll be covering our eyes as we watch these last two episodes.

    Why does it all matter?

    It matters because television finally has a great drama that makes no excuses. Breaking Bad seems destined to end with as much power and majesty as it had during any of its season-ending/season-opening cliffhangers. The water cooler conversation after the finale airs on September 29 will be dominated not by head- scratching analysis, but by slack-jawed awe.

    If that happens, Episode 514 may have marked the moment where serious television drama as a genre truly comes of age.

    Television is unique in that a showrunner begins a series without any real sense of where and when it’s going to end. Sometimes a show goes on way past its natural expiration date—see ER. Sometimes showrunners literally beg for a last-minute reprieve (see David Simon and The Wire.) And sometimes the money is so good that a showrunner will continue to churn out episodes after they would have preferred to have ended things earlier. (David Chase and The Sopranos)

    That’s why series endings have historically been so tricky. But Vince Gilligan, unlike many other showrunners, had a successful career in film before his time in television. He understands the simple virtues of a beginning, a middle, and an end. Story is powerful, whether it’s viewed one-week-at-a-time or binge-watched on Itunes or Netflix NFLX +2.48%. Breaking Bad is like a sprawling Russian novel come to your flat screen, or an epic film allowed to unfold at its own pace rather than edited down to three hours so the theatre can cram in an extra showing every day. By saving its best for last, Breaking Bad is quietly pushing the boundaries of this evolving genre.

    We can watch “Ozymandias” in a way that generally wasn’t possible in 2008 when Breaking Bad’s “Pilot” first aired. We have virtually instantaneous access to the new episode on demand and on-line. The days of wating for a re-run are history. We can, if we so choose, binge-watch Breaking Bad like a giant film. Or have random access to any page just as we would in a novel.

    Our HDTVs allow us to analyze previously invisible details, like the “With our Sympathies” greeting card sitting on a display behind Skyler at the carwash, visible in the background during her interaction with Walt, Jr. in Episode 513. Netflix and Itunes allow us a deep dive into the archives, to watch, and re-watch, the confrontation between Walt and Jesse after Brock was poisoned.

    These technologies, which enhance a truly great show, may be responsible in part for huge ratings boost for Breaking Bad’s premiere. As Kevin Spacey points out in this widely shared speech, television is changing and the lines between genres are blurring. Episode 514—and hopefully the episodes to follow—will set the bar for the next generation of content creators, showing them what’s possible and daring them to do even better.

    As a show about a 50-year-old science teacher with cancer, who turns to a life of cooking meth, Breaking Bad may have been the worst idea ever for a television show. But Vince Gilligan crafted a pilot that grabbed you by the collar and demanded your attention. Over the course of five roller-coaster seasons, the show never really let go. Now as it’s on the verge of delivering an ending that’s surprising, inevitable, and wholly earned, Breaking Bad seems poised to become something else.

    The Best. Show. Ever. And maybe too, one of the most important.

    * An earlier version of the column contained a slightly longer discussion of the phone call between Walt and Skyler. I initially thought that the emotions from Walt and Skyler were largely authentic, even though they knew the police were listening in. A number of readers suggested that Walt was mostly performing for the police listening in on the line, taking all the blame so that he can absolve Skyler. And Skyler, for her part, is going along with that. Although it took several viewings to come to that conclusion–my hatred for Walt was clouding my reason- I now think that’s a correct reading of the scene and I was simply missing something.

    It made me feel better to know that I’m not alone in this. The very smart Emily Nussbaum of The New Yorker wrote about that scene, and admits that she, too, missed it the first time around.

  11. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pac2566 View Post
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/allenstj...hat-matters/2/


    Why 'Breaking Bad' Is The Best Show Ever And Why That Matters

    Twenty three minutes into Episode 514, entitled “Ozymandias” after a Shelley poem, Breaking Bad made television history. Except that most fans didn’t notice. They were instead ready to cry, scream, vomit, or hurl a waffle iron at the plasma TV, or some combination of the above.

    Sometime around that first commercial break, Breaking Bad broke away from the pack and staked its claim to the title of television’s Best Show Ever.

    Over the course of five years, Vince Gilligan and his friends have constructed a world piece by piece, with attention to detail worthy of a Faberge egg. They created a compelling protagonist, a deeply flawed yet charismatic genius. They built a business at which he had savant-like skills, and depicted the family that often drove him crazy. Then blurred lines between the two. And in that way created a life for Walter White that many of us can relate to.

    But other great and groundbreaking TV dramas had done something similar, most notably David Chase’s The Sopranos, David Simon’s The Wire, and David Milch’s Deadwood.

    But Breaking Bad did something those iconic shows didn’t do. Showrunner Vince Gilligan set his protagonist in motion. Television had always been about a kind of inertia. After every episode of M*A*S*H or The Rockford Files there’d be a cosmic reset button that would allow the characters to return to exactly where they started at the beginning of the episode. That’s how you can make the Korean War last eleven years.

    And as that first generation of shows from television’s post-millennial Golden Era threw off so many of the shackles of convention inherent in the medium, they kept this one.

    Tony Soprano was a man who didn’t change, couldn’t change. Jimmy McNulty, Stringer Bell and other characters of The Wire fought hard for change—changing themselves and changing the system—but Simon’s message was that the drug/cop/court/prison/politics system in a fictionalized Baltimore was, tragically, too big and too strong to be taken down by a few angry men and women.

    Vince Gilligan started Breaking Bad with no such constraints. Whereas Tony Soprano spent seven seasons running errands around North Jersey, Walter White embarked on an epic journey, tracing an arc reserved for iconic characters of literature and cinema like Jay Gatsby and Michael Corleone.

    As he morphed Mr. Chips into Scarface, Gilligan wrote his own version of The Great American Novel. On Steroids.

    Part of Breaking Bad’s grandeur stems from the medium itself. Watching The Godfather Part I and Part II takes about six and a half hours. You can read The Great Gatsby in roughly the same amount of time.

    When it’s over, Breaking Bad will span 62 episodes. We’ll have spent almost ten times as much time with Walt and Jesse and Skyler as we did with Gatsby and Daisy or Michael Corleone and Tom Hagen. We know Walter White in a way that few great characters have ever been known, coming to that knowledge organically, over time.

    But we spent that same kind of time with Tony Soprano and McNulty. Breaking Bad differs from those shows–and surpasses them–in one important way. This is a story that’s moving toward an ending.

    The ending of The Sopranos, whether you loved it or hated it, was largely a non-ending. It was designed to make us think about the show and the act of watching it, as much as it made us think about Tony Soprano. The last season of The Wire, despite a number of resonant, even heartbreaking moments featuring Michael, Omar, and Bubbles, was simply not up to the standards of the four seasons that came before. Deadwood didn’t have a proper series finale at all. For all their cardinal virtues, those other contenders for the Best Show Ever left us feeling somewhat unsatisfied.

    Breaking Bad, on the other hand, is sticking the landing. Last week Gilligan teased us with a vision of how Breaking Bad might have ended if it were a 1970s cop show, with the click of handcuffs and a vindicated cop placing a triumphant phone call to his pretty, relieved wife.

    Having taken us on that detour, Gilligan pulls back from brink and begins an ending that’s majestic and horrible and completely of a piece with the 60 hours that came before. As Hank faced death last night and Walt unleashed his monstrous, destructive rage (setting in motion, as it always does, a torrent of suffering to come) these gut-wrenching moments were bought and paid for.

    “You’re the smartest guy I ever met,” Hank told Walt as Uncle Jack pointed a gun at his head. “And you’re too stupid to see. He made up his mind 10 minutes ago.”

    It’s a moment that can proudly stand beside the killing of Big ***** on The Sopranos, or the execution of Stringer Bell on The Wire. But unlike those great moments, Breaking Bad has built toward Hank’s death, and whatever comes next.

    The best moments of Ozymandias, directed by Rian Johnson of Looper fame, are filled with nuance and bits of craftsmanship that can be appreciated on the second and third—and tenth—viewings.

    But the first time through, the episode delivers a series of gut punches. Jesse. Junior. Marie. Skyler. One by one, each of the characters we care about have had their lives systematically torn apart.

    “Where’s Hank?” Skyler screams into the phone at Walt at the end of the episode echoing the classic line, “Where’s Wallace?” from Season One of The Wire. It’s a chilling moment taken purely on its own, but viewed as a homage, one that speaks to Breaking Bad’s ambition. The final season has been filled with small but telling references to The Wire and The Sopranos.

    The episode ends with Walt returning Holly to Skyler–inadvertently placing her squarely in the path of whatever danger is poised to come knocking at the White Family’s door.*

    (Dear Vince Gilligan: “Kids love fire trucks. Can’t Holly stay at the fire house for a while? Until she’s, like, 21? ”)

    It’s possible that with two hours left Vince Gilligan will flinch. But I get the sense that like Uncle Jack, he’s already made up his mind. And we’ll be covering our eyes as we watch these last two episodes.

    Why does it all matter?

    It matters because television finally has a great drama that makes no excuses. Breaking Bad seems destined to end with as much power and majesty as it had during any of its season-ending/season-opening cliffhangers. The water cooler conversation after the finale airs on September 29 will be dominated not by head- scratching analysis, but by slack-jawed awe.

    If that happens, Episode 514 may have marked the moment where serious television drama as a genre truly comes of age.

    Television is unique in that a showrunner begins a series without any real sense of where and when it’s going to end. Sometimes a show goes on way past its natural expiration date—see ER. Sometimes showrunners literally beg for a last-minute reprieve (see David Simon and The Wire.) And sometimes the money is so good that a showrunner will continue to churn out episodes after they would have preferred to have ended things earlier. (David Chase and The Sopranos)

    That’s why series endings have historically been so tricky. But Vince Gilligan, unlike many other showrunners, had a successful career in film before his time in television. He understands the simple virtues of a beginning, a middle, and an end. Story is powerful, whether it’s viewed one-week-at-a-time or binge-watched on Itunes or Netflix NFLX +2.48%. Breaking Bad is like a sprawling Russian novel come to your flat screen, or an epic film allowed to unfold at its own pace rather than edited down to three hours so the theatre can cram in an extra showing every day. By saving its best for last, Breaking Bad is quietly pushing the boundaries of this evolving genre.

    We can watch “Ozymandias” in a way that generally wasn’t possible in 2008 when Breaking Bad’s “Pilot” first aired. We have virtually instantaneous access to the new episode on demand and on-line. The days of wating for a re-run are history. We can, if we so choose, binge-watch Breaking Bad like a giant film. Or have random access to any page just as we would in a novel.

    Our HDTVs allow us to analyze previously invisible details, like the “With our Sympathies” greeting card sitting on a display behind Skyler at the carwash, visible in the background during her interaction with Walt, Jr. in Episode 513. Netflix and Itunes allow us a deep dive into the archives, to watch, and re-watch, the confrontation between Walt and Jesse after Brock was poisoned.

    These technologies, which enhance a truly great show, may be responsible in part for huge ratings boost for Breaking Bad’s premiere. As Kevin Spacey points out in this widely shared speech, television is changing and the lines between genres are blurring. Episode 514—and hopefully the episodes to follow—will set the bar for the next generation of content creators, showing them what’s possible and daring them to do even better.

    As a show about a 50-year-old science teacher with cancer, who turns to a life of cooking meth, Breaking Bad may have been the worst idea ever for a television show. But Vince Gilligan crafted a pilot that grabbed you by the collar and demanded your attention. Over the course of five roller-coaster seasons, the show never really let go. Now as it’s on the verge of delivering an ending that’s surprising, inevitable, and wholly earned, Breaking Bad seems poised to become something else.

    The Best. Show. Ever. And maybe too, one of the most important.

    * An earlier version of the column contained a slightly longer discussion of the phone call between Walt and Skyler. I initially thought that the emotions from Walt and Skyler were largely authentic, even though they knew the police were listening in. A number of readers suggested that Walt was mostly performing for the police listening in on the line, taking all the blame so that he can absolve Skyler. And Skyler, for her part, is going along with that. Although it took several viewings to come to that conclusion–my hatred for Walt was clouding my reason- I now think that’s a correct reading of the scene and I was simply missing something.

    It made me feel better to know that I’m not alone in this. The very smart Emily Nussbaum of The New Yorker wrote about that scene, and admits that she, too, missed it the first time around.
    I prefer contrarian views to groupthink.

    Reposting: http://www.avclub.com/articles/the-c...ng-bad,101439/

  12. #192
    Quote Originally Posted by Traitor Jay & the Woodies View Post
    I prefer contrarian views to groupthink.

    Reposting: http://www.avclub.com/articles/the-c...ng-bad,101439/
    It's ok ... Everyone is allowed to be wrong...

    ... from time to time


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

  13. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dunnie View Post
    It's ok ... Everyone is allowed to be wrong...

    ... from time to time


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
    I think it falls somewhere between these 2 takes and it depends on personal preference as to where you fall between the 2 views.

  14. #194
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hitman Harris View Post
    Walt gonna get that money! No way he tells them he buried 80 Mil out there without some kind of plan going on in his head.

    And he's not gonna use the Ricin on himself... LOL, who in the hell would kill themselves like that?! Yeah, let me give myself a slow painful death where I know all of my organs are shutting down
    after rewatching some of the latest episodes i am absolutely convinced walt will commit suicide. it is brought up twice that walt should. i believe walt's entire family is going to die in the next episode and won't care about money anymore. without his family the 80M is useless. maybe he won't use the ricin on himself because it is a terrible death, but maybe he feels he deserves it as a sort of repentance.

  15. #195
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trades View Post
    I think it falls somewhere between these 2 takes and it depends on personal preference as to where you fall between the 2 views.
    +1

    Interesting: 2nd to last paragraph is Eye-Ronic

    * An earlier version of the column contained a slightly longer discussion of the phone call between Walt and Skyler. I initially thought that the emotions from Walt and Skyler were largely authentic, even though they knew the police were listening in. A number of readers suggested that Walt was mostly performing for the police listening in on the line, taking all the blame so that he can absolve Skyler. And Skyler, for her part, is going along with that. Although it took several viewings to come to that conclusion–my hatred for Walt was clouding my reason- I now think that’s a correct reading of the scene and I was simply missing something.
    Last edited by WestCoastOffensive; 09-21-2013 at 09:50 PM.

  16. #196
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    Was thinking about this today...

    To the suggestion that the series is just pulp, I disagree. One of the major themes explored by the series is how without ever intending or meaning to we can incrementally become who we pretend to be. How as time goes on the lines between the mythical (if you will) person and the real person blur, each taking on aspects of the other, synthesizing.

    Think about the metamorphosis of Heisenberg. Originally he was just a made up person, a fake ID, designed to provide some measure of protection. Yet each time Walt says "I'm Heisenberg," he says so more convincingly, with more confidence, and believes it more himself. And it's not just Walt falling into the role of this character. At the same time as he's calling himself Heisenberg Walt's actions, accomplishments, misdeeds, are breathing life into Heisenberg, making him more than a myth. You're left wondering, did Walt become Heisenberg? Did Heisenberg become Walt. Probably it's both, and yet (and maybe this was another point the writers were trying to make) in the end, in, call it the battle for Walt's soul, it seems to be Heisenberg, the mythical figure who wins. The phone call to Skylar is incredibly touching...it's more than just Walttrying to say things that will get his wife off the hook...it's a final goodbye...Dr. Jeckyl telling his wife one last time and with what remains of his persona that he loves her, and that he has lost his battle with Mr. Hyde.
    Last edited by BushyTheBeaver; 09-22-2013 at 07:51 PM.

  17. #197
    Quote Originally Posted by BushyTheBeaver View Post
    Was thinking about this today...

    To the suggestion that the series is just pulp, I disagree. One of the major themes explored by the series is how without ever intending or meaning to we can incrementally become who we pretend to be. How as time goes on the lines between the mythical (if you will) person and the real person blur, each taking on aspects of the other, synthesizing.

    Think about the metamorphosis of Heisenberg. Originally he was just a made up person, a fake ID, designed to provide some measure of protection. Yet each time Hank says "I'm Heisenberg," he says so more convincingly, with more confidence, and believes it more himself. And it's not just Hank falling into the role of this character. At the same time as he's calling himself Heisenberg Hank's actions, accomplishments, misdeeds, are breathing life into Heisenberg, making him more than a myth. You're left wondering, did Hank become Heisenberg? Did Heisenberg become Hank. Probably it's both, and yet (and maybe this was another point the writers were trying to make) in the end, in, call it the battle for Hank's soul, it seems to be Heisenberg, the mythical figure who wins. The phone call to Skylar is incredibly touching...it's more than just Hank trying to say things that will get his wife off the hook...it's a final goodbye...Dr. Jeckyl telling his wife one last time and with what remains of his persona that he loves her, and that he has lost his battle with Mr. Hyde.
    So... HANK was Heisenberg... MIND BLOWN!
    Really makes me look at the show completely differently!

  18. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hitman Harris View Post
    So... HANK was Heisenberg
    Fixed. Thx.
    Last edited by BushyTheBeaver; 09-23-2013 at 11:07 AM.

  19. #199
    Quote Originally Posted by BushyTheBeaver View Post
    Fixed. Thx.
    LOL.. I have to imagine you were joking... Mainly with the number of times you said Hank.

  20. #200
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    O ****. I totally forgot about BB tonight. Goddamn you Pfail Strip, sucking me in.

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