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Thread: ~ ~ jets @ Cincinnati - Sunday, 4:05 pm ~ ~

  1. #1
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    Cool ~ ~ jets @ Cincinnati - Sunday, 4:05 pm ~ ~

    Remember Greg McElroy? Sure, you do. Until two months ago, he was one of the names of the New York Jets' quarterback carousel. He's a guy who started ahead of Tim Tebow last season when Mark Sanchez was benched. Ah, fun times.

    A short time before he gave McElroy a pink slip, Rex Ryan referred to him as the "smartest guy in the building." Coming out of Alabama, he almost aced the Wonderlic test, scoring a 48 out of a possible 50. This week, that brain will be working against Ryan & Co.

    McElroy is a member of the Cincinnati Bengals' practice squad and, although he won't be in uniform Sunday at Paul Brown Stadium, he will impact the game by what he contributes before Sunday. He will be an invaluable resouce for the Bengals, a virtual scout with intimate knowledge of the Jets' schemes and personnel.

    McElroy was exposed to Marty Mornhinweg's offense for only five months, but believe me, he knew it cold. Mornhinweg may have to change his audibles, because you can bet McElroy will be sharing his intel with the Bengals' defense. He also spent four months with Geno Smith, so he knows his strengths and weaknesses. I'm telling you, McElroy has a chance to be a general manager some day -- if he's not in politics or working college games for ESPN.

    The Jets might be preparing for the Bengals' No.1 red-headed quarterback, Andy Dalton, but the other red head -- McElroy -- is preparing for them.

    ICYMI: Tough times for Bill Belichick. First, he lost to the Jets. Second, he admitted he botched a rule interpretation on the controversial field goal push play. On Tuesday, he decided to fire back at the Jets. ... Four fans from Sunday's game, including the Long Island lout who slugged a woman, were charged with simple assault and disorderly conduct. That includes the woman who was struck. ... We analyzed the game tape. Yes, we study tape here at ESPN.com. ... See where the Jets landed in the current ESPN.com power poll.

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york/jets/

  2. #2
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    Wow, I hope McElroy doesn't cost us the game.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RMJK View Post
    Wow, I hope McElroy doesn't cost us the game.
    ...HE won't but our O might

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    Working against another rookie, Bengals hope to stop Jets from starting a run

    After disposing of New England in overtime last week, the Jets have a new goal as they approach Sunday’s game against the Bengals – start stringing some wins together. Only twice in a 31-game span has Gang Green been able to post back-to-back wins. You have to go back to the end of the 2009 season, when the Jets beat the Colts and Bengals, for the last time they have done it against teams over .500. “If anybody’s got any answers, I’ll be willing to listen,” said coach Rex Ryan about his team’s one-step-forward, one-step-back tendencies during a Monday press conference. “This will be our fourth shot at it this year. The fact that we’re playing Cincinnati doesn’t help matters. That’s for sure. They’re playing about as well as anybody right now. Again, our mindset’s going to be ‘It’s all about this opponent.’ We respect an opponent. We respect all opponents, but we fear nobody.” No one epitomizes the roller coaster more than quarterback Geno Smith. One week he’s leading the Jets on a game-winning drive and the next he looks every bit a rookie. So far the Jets’ pattern has been wins in odd-numbered weeks followed by losses in even-numbered ones. In Week 2 at New England, Smith threw three fourth-quarter interceptions. In Week 4 at Tennessee it was two picks and two fumbles. Against Pittsburgh two weeks ago it was another two interceptions.

    Quick facts
    Cincinnati (5-2) vs. New York Jets (4-3) | 4:05 p.m., CBS | Paul Brown Stadium

    TV announcers: Kevin Harlan and Solomon Wilcots

    Radio: WLW-AM (700), WCKY-AM (1530), WEBN-FM (102.7)

    The line: Bengals by 6.5

    Series: Jets lead 17-7 but are 5-5 at Cincinnati. The Jets have won the past four and nine of the last 10.

    Last week: The Bengals got their second straight road win, edging Detroit 27-24.

    The Jets defeated New England 30-27 in overtime.

    Bengals league rankings: Offense 12th (18th rushing, 9th passing); Defense 9th (9th rushing, 113h passing).

    Jets league rankings: Offense 15th (11th rushing, T-21st passing); Defense 4th (2nd rushing, 10th passing).

    CONNECTIONS
    Between head coaches: Marvin Lewis and Rex Ryan coached together in Baltimore from 1999-2001. Lewis was the defensive coordinator and Ryan the defensive line coach.

    With UC: Ryan was the defensive coordinator in 1996-97. He also was a defensive ends coach at Eastern Kentucky for two seasons (1987-88).

    With Ohio State: WR Santonio Holmes started 28 of 36 games from 2003-05 and had 25 touchdowns. ... C Nick Mangold, a Centerville native, was a three-year starter, serving as a co-captain his senior year in 2005.

    Others from Ohio: TE Jeff Cumberland is a Columbus native. ... RB Chris Ivory played at Tiffin. ... Offensive line coach Mike Devlin coached at Toledo from 2004-05.

    Others from Kentucky: RB Bilal Powell played at Louisville. ... Assistant/linebackers coach Jeff Weeks coached at Western Kentucky from 1987-88, and at Morehead State from 1990-91.

    Former Jets: Bengals assistant head coach/offensive line coach Paul Alexander (1992-93) and defensive backs coach Mark Carrier (2010-11) were on the Jets’ staff for two seasons. ... K Mike Nugent was drafted in the second round in 2005 and played for New York from 2005-08.

    JETS TO WATCH
    QB Geno Smith: The second-round pick passed for one touchdown and rushed for another in the win over New England. Smith has led a game-winning drive in the fourth quarter or overtime in all four wins and he is the only quarterback since the 1970 merger with four such game-winning drives in his first seven games. He has eight touchdowns but also the third-most interceptions in the league with 11.

    DL Muhammad Wilkerson: The third-year player has 6.0 sacks, which is eighth in the AFC, and is a new single-season high for him. Wilkerson has a sack in three straight games and, dating back to 2012, has re-corded 10 sacks in his last 14 games. Through seven games, he has 41 tackles, one forced fumble and leads the team with 18 quarterback hurries and seven tackles for loss.

    KEY NUMBER
    15: Third-down receptions by Jeremy Kerley, which is tied for second in the league. He is averaging 13.1 yards per catch with one touchdown. Kerley leads the team in receptions (24) and receiving yards (319).

    > http://news.cincinnati.com/apps/pbcs...nclick_check=1

  5. #5
    Key to the game: Geno Smith has been sacked 25 times so far (2nd highest in the NFL behind Ryan Tannehill). He's also lost 190 yards on those sacks (#1 in the league).


    Jets have to protect Smith way better than they have been in this game. Cincy is middle of the pack in sacks, so this is very do-able. Another interesting stat is the Jets defense is 3rd overall in sacks so far this season. They definitely ARE getting to the Quarterback. Dalton has been sacked 15 times so far so this figures to be a factor for the Jets.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelly View Post
    ...HE won't but our O might
    I hope you are right.

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    Adam Jones broke down and wept when he saw what happened to Leon Hall early in Sunday's game in Detroit. Then he saw fellow cornerback Terence Newman crying and it got even worse."I lost my (stuff)," Jones admitted Monday. "I know me and T-New were looking at each other and we were like literally, tears were coming down our eyes. And he was like, ‘Man, we’ve got to get it together.’ But it kind of shook me the first two plays, I was like ‘Oh my God.’ But you’ve got to move on."And that's where the Bengals are as they regroup without their best cover cornerback for the rest of the year as Hall recovers from what is feared to be a torn Achilles for the second time in 23 months on the other (right) foot.

    Mentor, leader, All-Pro. Hall's got it all and everyone agrees around Paul Brown Stadium it can't get any more devastating.

    But …

    How many teams can line up with three first-round cornerbacks after losing their best one?

    "Nobody said it was going to be easy, though," Jones said. "You’re going to have nicks and knacks and things that happen. That’s why I give the people upstairs a lot of respect. They’ve got a lot of guys who can play – in every position. I will say this is one of the deepest teams I’ve been on."

    Newman was the fifth pick in the 2003 draft. Jones was the sixth pick in the 2005 draft. And now all eyes are on the next man up, Dre Kirkpatrick, the 17th pick in the 2012 draft who, according to Pro Football Focus has played 67 NFL snaps.


    The Bengals are banking on the depth bailing them out of this one better than when Hall ripped the other Achilles, the left, on Nov. 13, 2011. That's when Newman was still in Dallas, Kirkpatrick was at Alabama, and Jones was trying to get healthy in just his second year in the system.

    "We’re all playing better than we were playing two years ago. I know I am," said Jones, who started in Hall's spot like he'll no doubt do this time.

    "You can’t come over here one week and learn the defense. It’s no way you can do that. It takes you, to be comfortable, I’d say a year, to learn this defense. We do stuff so much different than the average team, and the regular Cover 3 is not the same. None of this stuff is the same defense.

    "But I think we’ll be alright. Of course we’ll miss Leon. He made a whole bunch of plays, so there’s no way you replace that guy. But there’s a lot of guys in here that are just ready to step up."

    Kirkpatrick played just 10 snaps Sunday as 11-year safety Chris Crocker took the bulk of the work in Hall's absence, particularly in nickel, where Hall is rated the No. 1 slot corner by Pro Football Focus. Crocker went from playing three snaps in Buffalo to 67 on Sunday. Kirkpatrick, who only played the outside at Alabama, had to play in the slot a few times Sunday because the Lions use a spread, a formation the Bengals won't see all that much. Crocker figures to be in the slot most of the time sandwiched between Newman and Jones.

    But Kirkpatrick, hounded by injuries for his entire pro career until the past month, is the next man up and is learning and playing the slot just in case. The Bengals would also like to use Brandon Ghee, a 2010 third-round pick who has played fewer snaps than Kirkpatrick.

    "We’ve had different guys go in there and Coach calls it and is drawing things and coming up with different ideas of how we want to play it and try to attack their scheme and what they’re doing," said secondary coach Mark Carrier. "We’ve had different guys going. Obviously Crock’s played. Terence has played in there. Taylor Mays has played there. We’ve had different guys over the course of the year play in that nickel spot. It’s all about where we want to go with the game plan. ... We don’t know what we’re going to do yet. We’re kind of working that out now."

    The coaches like the 6-2 Kirkpatrick's length on both the outside and the inside and they're encouraged about how he stuck his nose in there against the incomparable Calvin Johnson. The 6-5, 240-pound Johnson still scored on Kirkpatrick on Sunday on a 27-yard back-shoulder floater even though Kirkpatrick was draped all over him. Minutes later Johnson pulled down a jump ball out of a tangle of three Bengals.

    "It was just one of those plays. I look at my play and then I look at the second play that he made, so I was kind of all right about mine," Kirkpatrick said. "It was pretty cool just to be out there with a great player."

    Carrier had some of those moments as a Pro Bowl safety in the '90s. He still remembers being "posterized" by a young thing named Randy Moss leaping over him much like Johnson did to everybody Sunday. Carrier maintains this is a different Kirkpatrick than the one that got sliced and diced by Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo so badly in Dallas during the preseason that it was painful.

    "Leaps and bounds better. And it’s ironic because after that situation in Dallas, one of the first persons to go up to him and share some things with him was Leon Hall," Carrier said. "He kind of let him know about his tough day he had back when he first came into the league. He said you can learn from it and get better from it, and I think Dre did. We had to go out there and get on (Johnson), and I thought he did a nice job."

    Kirkpatrick says he'll never forget that Dallas game. He still watches the tape. And if he does forget, defensive coordinator Mike Zimmer will remind him. That's why he looked at it as recently as two weeks ago.

    "Zim was talking about it and I just went back and reminded myself I never want this feeling again," Kirkpatrick said. "Sour. It's a bitter taste.

    "It was one of those games, one of those days a lot of great players have. You just have to continue to work through it and improve every day. I learned my lesson. I took my notes and I continue to still watch that game. Zim is always bringing it up to remind me. I know what it feels like and I don't want to have that feeling anymore."

    Jones lived through that in 2011 and while he's been beaten a few times this year, he held up very well against Megatron. The Lions went after Jones with Johnson on that last series but didn't get it to him.

    "He had a real good, consistent game," Carrier said of Jones. "He worked on some things in practice and brought them to the game and did a nice job. He had a real solid game. He was laughing on the sideline and enjoying it. He was welcoming the challenge of (No.) 81."

    Now, two years later, Jones has to be the savvy veteran. Hall is what he calls his "study buddy." Held back in the past by inconsistent technique, Jones worked extremely hard on that part of his game.

    “We’ve had to depend on Adam. He’s come to play and when he’s played with technique and the proper levels and footwork he’s done a nice job. He’s played well and I expect him to play even better,” Carrier said.

    “We’ve got the guys that we have to be able to plug someone in and still kind of run our defense. Still be out there competing and covering guys. When you lose a guy for the year that’s tough because now you’re going into your depth and new guys have to step up.”

    But Carrier noted how Hall played only 20 of the 70 or so snaps Sunday as the defense began the healing process. Head coach Marvin Lewis said after the game the Bengals had to use some bailing wire to make it stay together.

    Now it looks like they're using some blood sweat and tears, too.

    "I just hope (Hall) can stay around and keep feeding us the knowledge that he’s got and helping us out with studying," Jones said. "The guy is a genius when it comes to studying. He was my study buddy. Our standards here, words can’t explain how much."

    > http://www.bengals.com/news/article-...5-ea5bd46e97d2

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelly View Post
    Adam Jones broke down and wept when he saw what happened to Leon Hall early in Sunday's game in Detroit. Then he saw fellow cornerback Terence Newman crying and it got even worse."I lost my (stuff)," Jones admitted Monday. "I know me and T-New were looking at each other and we were like literally, tears were coming down our eyes. And he was like, ‘Man, we’ve got to get it together.’ But it kind of shook me the first two plays, I was like ‘Oh my God.’ But you’ve got to move on."And that's where the Bengals are as they regroup without their best cover cornerback for the rest of the year as Hall recovers from what is feared to be a torn Achilles for the second time in 23 months on the other (right) foot.

    Mentor, leader, All-Pro. Hall's got it all and everyone agrees around Paul Brown Stadium it can't get any more devastating.

    But …

    How many teams can line up with three first-round cornerbacks after losing their best one?

    "Nobody said it was going to be easy, though," Jones said. "You’re going to have nicks and knacks and things that happen. That’s why I give the people upstairs a lot of respect. They’ve got a lot of guys who can play – in every position. I will say this is one of the deepest teams I’ve been on."

    Newman was the fifth pick in the 2003 draft. Jones was the sixth pick in the 2005 draft. And now all eyes are on the next man up, Dre Kirkpatrick, the 17th pick in the 2012 draft who, according to Pro Football Focus has played 67 NFL snaps.


    The Bengals are banking on the depth bailing them out of this one better than when Hall ripped the other Achilles, the left, on Nov. 13, 2011. That's when Newman was still in Dallas, Kirkpatrick was at Alabama, and Jones was trying to get healthy in just his second year in the system.

    "We’re all playing better than we were playing two years ago. I know I am," said Jones, who started in Hall's spot like he'll no doubt do this time.

    "You can’t come over here one week and learn the defense. It’s no way you can do that. It takes you, to be comfortable, I’d say a year, to learn this defense. We do stuff so much different than the average team, and the regular Cover 3 is not the same. None of this stuff is the same defense.

    "But I think we’ll be alright. Of course we’ll miss Leon. He made a whole bunch of plays, so there’s no way you replace that guy. But there’s a lot of guys in here that are just ready to step up."

    Kirkpatrick played just 10 snaps Sunday as 11-year safety Chris Crocker took the bulk of the work in Hall's absence, particularly in nickel, where Hall is rated the No. 1 slot corner by Pro Football Focus. Crocker went from playing three snaps in Buffalo to 67 on Sunday. Kirkpatrick, who only played the outside at Alabama, had to play in the slot a few times Sunday because the Lions use a spread, a formation the Bengals won't see all that much. Crocker figures to be in the slot most of the time sandwiched between Newman and Jones.

    But Kirkpatrick, hounded by injuries for his entire pro career until the past month, is the next man up and is learning and playing the slot just in case. The Bengals would also like to use Brandon Ghee, a 2010 third-round pick who has played fewer snaps than Kirkpatrick.

    "We’ve had different guys go in there and Coach calls it and is drawing things and coming up with different ideas of how we want to play it and try to attack their scheme and what they’re doing," said secondary coach Mark Carrier. "We’ve had different guys going. Obviously Crock’s played. Terence has played in there. Taylor Mays has played there. We’ve had different guys over the course of the year play in that nickel spot. It’s all about where we want to go with the game plan. ... We don’t know what we’re going to do yet. We’re kind of working that out now."

    The coaches like the 6-2 Kirkpatrick's length on both the outside and the inside and they're encouraged about how he stuck his nose in there against the incomparable Calvin Johnson. The 6-5, 240-pound Johnson still scored on Kirkpatrick on Sunday on a 27-yard back-shoulder floater even though Kirkpatrick was draped all over him. Minutes later Johnson pulled down a jump ball out of a tangle of three Bengals.

    "It was just one of those plays. I look at my play and then I look at the second play that he made, so I was kind of all right about mine," Kirkpatrick said. "It was pretty cool just to be out there with a great player."

    Carrier had some of those moments as a Pro Bowl safety in the '90s. He still remembers being "posterized" by a young thing named Randy Moss leaping over him much like Johnson did to everybody Sunday. Carrier maintains this is a different Kirkpatrick than the one that got sliced and diced by Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo so badly in Dallas during the preseason that it was painful.

    "Leaps and bounds better. And it’s ironic because after that situation in Dallas, one of the first persons to go up to him and share some things with him was Leon Hall," Carrier said. "He kind of let him know about his tough day he had back when he first came into the league. He said you can learn from it and get better from it, and I think Dre did. We had to go out there and get on (Johnson), and I thought he did a nice job."

    Kirkpatrick says he'll never forget that Dallas game. He still watches the tape. And if he does forget, defensive coordinator Mike Zimmer will remind him. That's why he looked at it as recently as two weeks ago.

    "Zim was talking about it and I just went back and reminded myself I never want this feeling again," Kirkpatrick said. "Sour. It's a bitter taste.

    "It was one of those games, one of those days a lot of great players have. You just have to continue to work through it and improve every day. I learned my lesson. I took my notes and I continue to still watch that game. Zim is always bringing it up to remind me. I know what it feels like and I don't want to have that feeling anymore."

    Jones lived through that in 2011 and while he's been beaten a few times this year, he held up very well against Megatron. The Lions went after Jones with Johnson on that last series but didn't get it to him.

    "He had a real good, consistent game," Carrier said of Jones. "He worked on some things in practice and brought them to the game and did a nice job. He had a real solid game. He was laughing on the sideline and enjoying it. He was welcoming the challenge of (No.) 81."

    Now, two years later, Jones has to be the savvy veteran. Hall is what he calls his "study buddy." Held back in the past by inconsistent technique, Jones worked extremely hard on that part of his game.

    “We’ve had to depend on Adam. He’s come to play and when he’s played with technique and the proper levels and footwork he’s done a nice job. He’s played well and I expect him to play even better,” Carrier said.

    “We’ve got the guys that we have to be able to plug someone in and still kind of run our defense. Still be out there competing and covering guys. When you lose a guy for the year that’s tough because now you’re going into your depth and new guys have to step up.”

    But Carrier noted how Hall played only 20 of the 70 or so snaps Sunday as the defense began the healing process. Head coach Marvin Lewis said after the game the Bengals had to use some bailing wire to make it stay together.

    Now it looks like they're using some blood sweat and tears, too.

    "I just hope (Hall) can stay around and keep feeding us the knowledge that he’s got and helping us out with studying," Jones said. "The guy is a genius when it comes to studying. He was my study buddy. Our standards here, words can’t explain how much."

    > http://www.bengals.com/news/article-...5-ea5bd46e97d2
    Same thing happened to us with Revis. You get a ProBowl player and he's gives you 7 games and he gets replace with a JAG.


    Good post Kelly.

  9. #9
    Pacman Jones?
    "You’re going to have nicks and knacks and things that happen. LMAO!

  10. #10
    yo dude ,whats up?

  11. #11
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    BENGALS: We‘re Young and the Sky’s the Limit

    Transcripts of A.J. Green's and Marvin Lewis' conference calls with Jets reporters Wednesday afternoon:

    BENGALS WR A.J. GREEN

    On what he has noticed from Antonio Cromartie…

    He’s a long corner. He’s a veteran corner. He’s been around the league a long time, so I’m going to have to work him.

    On how he prepares to face a player he has never played against…

    I just rely on the film. I go out there and watch him and see what he does well. Like I said, he’s very long, so I have to keep his hands down.

    On if he noticed Cromartie playing press coverage more against the Patriots…

    Like I said, I’ve seen a little bit but not much. But like I said, he has some real long arms and he gets his hands on well. He’s very athletic. So like I said, I’m really going to have to work him well.

    On if he can take advantage of anything Cromartie has struggled with this season…

    I don’t think he’s struggling. I just think guys are putting him in good position, putting the ball in good position. He’s a great corner. Like I said, he’s been around this league a long time. Corners are going to get beat here and there but I think he’s one of the best in the league.

    On where he has developed in his game…

    I think the biggest thing for me is being more a student of the game, be able to play different positions and run all the routes that they want me to.

    On if he was a one-position receiver at Georgia…

    Yeah, I really didn’t play a lot of slot areas but now I am.

    On what the toughest adjustment has been to playing all over the field…

    Just being more patient. Just not being so fast. A lot of it’s got to be feel.

    On how he went about making adjustments to playing more positions…

    Yeah, I’ve got to be more studious. Just watching film, watching some of the older guys like Reggie Wayne and the way he’s working out of the slot.

    On what receivers he studied…

    Andre Johnson, Larry [Fitzgerald], the way they move him around, Calvin [Johnson], some of those guys.

    On what he does to be more studious…

    Like I said, I go home, I’ve got an iPad so it’s real convenient. I take it home while I’m watching TV and during commercials breaks I’m usually watching some film or it just takes an hour or two to watch some of the corners.

    On developing his relationship with Andy Dalton…

    I think the biggest thing for us is we’re communicating more. I tell him what I see, he tells me what I need to do. The biggest thing for us is communication.

    On when he started communicating well with Dalton…

    It was probably coming into this year. We were definitely communicating much more.

    On if he tells Dalton about what he sees on his routes…

    Yeah, exactly. What I need to do. "Not take this a little higher" or "shake this down a little more," "get my eyes around a little quicker."

    On his success this season and what he needs to do to be one of the best receivers in the NFL…

    Just getting better, continuing to get better each week. That’s what I try. I try to work on every little aspect of my game and watch game film or watch what I need to do better. I think that’s the biggest thing, just not being complacent with where I was and just continue to build.

    On where he feels the Bengals are as a franchise…

    I feel like we’re a young team and the sky’s the limit if we continue to get better.

    On if there is an optimistic vibe because they are a young team…

    Yeah. I feel like the sky’s the limit for us. We’ve got all the weapons to be that great team. We’ve just got to continue to take that next step.

    On Dalton’s style and what makes him stand out…

    I think the biggest thing is his leadership this year. He’s more vocal. He’s really not a talkative guy, but you know he’s the leader of the team because when he says something, he knows what he’s talking about. His biggest thing right now is if he says something, you know we’ve got to do it. His communication's much better.

    On how he has seen Dalton be more vocal…

    It’s both practice and in the film study. He controls all the meetings. We have Friday meetings with just the offense and he’s the one talking, going through the film, going through the protections.

    On if Dalton had taken that kind of vocal role before this year…

    No, this is his first time taking the meetings into his own hands.

    On what it does for a team to have that type of leader…

    I think it shows leadership and we definitely know he’s our leader.

    BENGALS HEAD COACH MARVIN LEWIS

    On what he has seen from Geno Smith through seven games…

    I think with Marty [Mornhinweg] and other coaches and Rex [Ryan] and so forth, they’ve really, I think, done a good job of building this offense and doing the things around his abilities and skills. You see him growing and obviously when he takes care of the ball, they’re going to be successful. That’s what you want from a young quarterback and I think he’s done a great job of that. He’s not playing like a deer in the headlights and necessarily, when you watch how he played a week ago, he doesn’t necessarily look like a rookie quarterback.

    On Ryan’s defense being part Buddy Ryan, part him, part Dennis Thurman, part Mike Nolan and how his experience with the defense helps him prepare to face it…

    I don’t know that my experiences with Rex have helped us prepare for it very well. They’re a big, physical group. Rex, he did a great job as a position coach with me, he’s done a great job as a coordinator after me and now as the head coach there and installing what he wants. He rallies the troops. They’ve built a big, physical group over there and they’re playing very well.

    On his thoughts on how the Jets-Patriots game ended…

    No comment. That’s something I learned from Rex, right? That’s what he would say, right? No comment [joking].

    On saying that he goes over new rules weekly and that the Patriots players that committed the penalty must have been doing so on their own behalf…

    I don’t know that because I don’t know what guys were coached to do on either side of the football that day. It is a rule change. There was a rule change in order to prevent certain things and I do know that it’s been something that was somewhat kind of going around and people had noticed it and I know there had been some talk about it.

    On how Andy Dalton is playing…

    I think Andy has to continue each and every week to really just play his football game. A lot of times when you have a really good player like we have in A.J. [Green], people think A.J. was in a slump. Well, A.J.’s going to get balls and chances every time we make a first down, every time other guys make plays against the weakness of the coverage. And the problem is, Andy can’t listen to others outside of this building talk about "A.J. needs the ball," because we can set guys around A.J., Rex and Dennis can put guys around A.J. and make it very difficult to get A.J. the football. And if we try to keep throwing that ball in to A.J., we’re going to have turnovers.

    He’s got to kind of have that mentality just to be focused on him and what his job is and that’s to allow the play to work, get us in and out of the right plays, let the play work, work the coverage and then get the ball to the guy who’s got the 1-on-1 and those particular players have to win the 1-on-1's.

    On his experience as a coach without contract assurances …

    Actually, it really didn’t weigh much on my mind whatsoever. After the 2009 season, I was offered a new contract, never came to an agreement throughout the year. I was offered it before the season and within the season and we just didn’t come to an agreement until after the season was over. I just chose to wait until after the season was over and then we came to an agreement after the 2010 season.

    I think every coach's situation’s a little different. To me, a guy of Rex’s quality, he’s going to be fine either way and I think deep down you’ve got to know that. I don’t think he’s worried much about that. He’s done a great job there getting that football team into the [AFC] championship game, what, two years in a row and into the playoffs, into the championship game. He’s really done a fine job. I’m obviously, most weeks, a fan of his and things, and reach out to him quite a bit that way. I’ll just send him a text. I’m a fan of his all the time.

    On if he modeled his Hard Knocks performance after Ryan…

    No. I don’t have that type of personality [joking].

    On if he is pleased with how his team is progressing…

    We are. We’re pleased to kind of figure out our own identity and keep them working at it. We’ve got to keep that up. That’s why this is a big, important game for us. It’s a huge game against a very good team and we’ve got to be up to the challenge and play well.

    On if his team is embracing playing in close games or if he is hoping for a few laughers…

    Well, we would always hope for a laugher, but I’ve been in the NFL for 22 seasons and I’m still waiting for those. I haven’t been on the side of many of that. I don’t know that that occurs much. I point to that all the time to our players, how many games in the NFL are decided by three points or less and seven points or less and how much each possession really means.

    > http://www.newyorkjets.com/news/arti...c-250781da2a9f

  12. #12
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    . -- Dennis Thurman isn't worried about Greg McElroy.

    The New York Jets defensive coordinator said it's "overrated" that McElroy, a former Jet quarterback currently on the Bengals' practice squad, can provide precious intel to Cincinnati in preparation for Sunday's game between the teams.

    McElroy"Don't give that too much credit," Thurman said. "I left Dallas after eight years and went and played in St. Louis and couldn't remember jack. Don't put too much stock in that. It's overrated. It really is."

    It's common knowledge that teams will ask players to provide information on their former teams, and McElroy, who started for the Jets last season, would have plenty to share. McElroy spent two-plus years with the Jets before being released, and knows the schemes and audible calls the Jets used on both sides of the ball.

    Thurman said good offenses and good defenses made adjustments with their play calls, especially when they know they're going to be playing against someone who's been around their system.

    He used the example of a play called "Red 88," saying it may have meant one thing when McElroy was with the Jets, but any alteration by the Jets would leave the Bengals expecting a different play.

    "One word change or one color or one number and all of a sudden what Greg McElroy told you don't mean jack," Thurman said. "It's overrated."

    Thurman added that it's very difficult to accurately predict what teams are going to do before every snap, even with inside information.

    "Football is a game where if they hit you at the right time with the right call, there's a weakness in every defense, and there's times when they might hit you at the right time," Thurman said. "To anticipate something or believe you know something, it's a good guess. It'd be a good guess on his part."

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york/jet...y-sharing-info

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    Rookie quarterbacks have caused the Cincinnati Bengals problems in recent seasons, as their 7-8 record against them since 2008 attests. On Sunday afternoon in the familiar confines of Paul Brown Stadium, they hope to pull that record even when Geno Smith and the New York Jets come to town.

    Just like the Bengals' own young quarterback, Smith has found the winning formula the past five weeks, winning three games in that span. All four of the wins he has engineered this season have become victories because of game-winning drives he has led. While there might be other factors at play that are contributing more to New York's 4-3 record, there isn't much denying that Smith has had some hand in it, too.

    As they interrupt a four-cities-in-five-weeks road tour with this home game, the Bengals are looking to extend their winning streak to four. In this edition of Double Coverage, ESPN.com Bengals reporter Coley Harvey and Jets reporter Rich Cimini look at what could contribute to that happening or to Cincinnati losing and dropping to 5-3.

    Coley Harvey: So Rich, Sunday’s game will feature two of the three players in the league named Geno. Bengals defensive tackle Geno Atkins and Jets quarterback Geno Smith have earned rather impressive headlines this season. In Atkins’ case, it was for signing his $55 million contract extension five days before the season opener. Recently, Smith’s headlines have come from the four game-winning drives he’s led. Both are good young players, but something will have to give. How confident are Smith and the Jets that they’ll be able to keep Atkins and the rest of Cincinnati’s defensive line out of their backfield?

    Rich Cimini: You just hit on one of the keys to the game, Coley. The Jets have allowed a lot of sacks (25), but I think many of those can be attributed to Smith, who tends to hold the ball too long. That said, the line needs to do a better job, especially the left side. Tackle D'Brickashaw Ferguson and rookie guard Brian Winters allowed two sacks apiece last week, bringing their totals to four and three, respectively. That's not a good number for Winters, who has started only three games. I don't see how he handles Atkins; he's simply not ready for that kind of challenge this soon. There are some tough matchups across the board for the Jets. The coaches will have to game plan ways for Smith to get the ball out quickly. I see Andy Dalton is coming off a big game. Is the Bengals' offense for real?

    Harvey: It’s tough to really answer that question, Rich. One week the Bengals' offense looks for real, the next, it looks like a cheap imitation of its former self. Thankfully for the Bengals, though, the ineptitude they have shown offensively at times this season hasn’t shown up in the past three weeks. You could say Dalton is a big reason why. He is, after all, coming off back-to-back 300-yard passing performances. The more likely reason this offense has started taking off, though, lies in something Pro Bowl left tackle Andrew Whitworth talks about often: the apparent “matchup problems” the Bengals create. In addition to receiver A.J. Green, the Bengals have quality second- and third-tier receivers in Mohamed Sanu and Marvin Jones, a pair of ball-seeking tight ends in Jermaine Gresham and Tyler Eifert and a balanced rushing attack led by BenJarvus Green-Ellis and the shifty Giovani Bernard. Cincinnati has finally figured out how to use all these weapons, and it's paying off.

    The Bengals’ offensive line has been a group of unsung heroes of sorts, too. They had a fairly easy challenge last week preparing for Detroit’s line-first pass rush. Just how complex are the looks the Jets’ multiple defensive fronts give teams this season? Could the Jets' defense be a key to this game?

    Cimini: Definitely. The Jets are ranked fourth in total defense, due largely to the line. We're witnessing the emergence of something special. The linemen are all good, and they're all young, starting with Muhammad Wilkerson, who is on his way to his first Pro Bowl. The next-best is rookie Sheldon Richardson, a high-energy player who shows up in the running game and the passing game. Quinton Coples is listed as a rush linebacker, but he's often in a three-point stance. He's coming off his best game of the season. This is what happens when you draft a defensive lineman in each of the past three first rounds. The Jets will control the Bengals' running game, and they will get after Dalton on obvious passing downs, but they're vulnerable to quick, short passes. That's how you neutralize the Jets' big fellas.

    The Jets did a good job last week against the Patriots' Rob Gronkowski, but now they face a double threat at tight end with Gresham and Eifert. How are they being utilized?

    Harvey: So that’s the way to neutralize the Jets’ front, huh? Bad news for Gang Green: Short, quick passes are the Bengals’ forte. Dalton has thrived throwing them all season. On passes that have traveled 5 yards or less, he has the league’s highest completion percentage at 76.7 percent. On 66 completions from that range, he has thrown for 500 yards. Of those, 316 have come after the catch.

    Eifert and Gresham certainly are major contributors to that short-passing game, grabbing balls off flare screens and slants across the middle. Last week, though, Eifert caught his first touchdown pass of the season when he ran a seam route deep into the Lions’ secondary for a 32-yard reception. While they are tight ends and do their share of pass blocking and run blocking, Eifert and Gresham are true threats in the Bengals’ passing game, too.

    Going back to Geno Smith for a moment. What has been the trick the past few weeks to him leading these game-winning drives?

    Cimini: The trick? I go back to something Rex Ryan said a few weeks ago. I asked him what he learned from his first experience with a rookie quarterback (Mark Sanchez, 2009), and he said, "Make sure you have a great defense." So, yes, Smith has enjoyed some dramatic moments, but they're 4-3 because of the defense. But since you asked about Smith ...

    He became the first rookie since the merger in 1970 to register four game-winning drives in the fourth quarter or overtime in his first seven games. Clearly, his signature drive came against the Falcons, when he drove them to the winning field goal in the final two minutes. In the other three game-winning drives, he attempted a total of five passes, including a 69-yard touchdown strike. Obviously, we're not talking about a lot of passing shows. But he never gets visibly rattled, he always seems in control -- good qualities to have. Do you think Smith could have some success against the Leon Hall-less secondary? The Lions' Matthew Stafford picked them apart for 357 yards.

    Harvey: It’s certainly possible. The Bengals are going to be bringing in one of their own young players, second-year cornerback Dre Kirkpatrick to perform some of the responsibilities that had been Hall’s. Kirkpatrick will be playing some in the slot, he’ll be playing some outside. You’ll see recently signed veteran Chris Crocker taking some of Hall’s snaps. Adam Jones will be getting some, as well. And assuming he’s healthy enough to play, Terence Newman will be getting his share of opportunities to lock down the Jets’ receivers. In short, without Hall, it’ll be a cornerback-by-committee setup for the Bengals. It’s worked before, most notably against the Patriots in Week 5, when Hall was out with a hamstring injury. The week before, the Bengals still held the Browns in check defensively, even though they ended up losing that game 17-6.

    Cincinnati’s main concern, judging from last week’s Jets-Patriots game, seems to be stopping New York’s running game. A lot of people here this week have been comparing the Jets to the Bills with respect to the potency of their multi-back running game. As someone who will see the Bills twice this season, do you think that’s a fair comparison to make for a defense that’s used to facing truer pass-first offenses?

    Cimini: The Jets use a two-man committee, Bilal Powell and Chris Ivory. In that sense, they compare to the Bills. In terms of ability, they're not as potent as the Bills. The Jets don't have a C.J. Spiller-type, meaning a home-run threat. They are the ultimate grind-it-out rushing attack. Their most explosive back, Mike Goodson, blew out his knee two weeks ago, so he's done for the seaosn -- and they will miss his ability to threaten the perimeter. Powell and Ivory are a nice tandem, each capable of a 100-yard rushing day on any given Sunday, but I wouldn't say either one possesses special qualities. Powell is more of a slasher than Ivory, who reminds me of a poor man's Marshawn Lynch. In other words, he runs with some nasty. You won't see them running too often outside the tackles. They also mix in some Wildcat and read-option, maybe five to 10 plays a game. Recently signed Josh Cribbs, no stranger to the AFC North, got a couple of reps last week in the Wildcat. I wouldn't sleep on him if I were the Bengals.

    There was a lot of chatter in New York before the draft about the possibility of picking Bernard. What has he brought to the Bengals' offense?

    Harvey: Yeah, I don’t think anybody in Cincinnati is going to sleep on Cribbs. They know better than most teams just what he can do. With respect to the Jets’ overall rushing game, it was kind of surprising to hear Bengals linebacker Vontaze Burfict almost nonchalantly dismiss it this week. He said he didn’t think the Bengals would have much issue stopping it, saying that after “15, 20 plays” the Jets would realize it wouldn’t work. Big, bold talk from the NFL’s leading tackler. Then again, Burfict is the one who was scolded this training camp for bringing Bernard to the ground during a practice drill, so maybe he really can talk that talk.

    Bernard really is a special player, Rich. New York had good reason to be excited about possibly drafting him. He’s quick, shifty, has great acceleration and is a home run threat. His two receiving touchdowns have come on short screen passes that ended up becoming longer gains. Both scores were caught at the line of scrimmage and resulted in 20- and 27-yard touchdowns, respectively. He certainly brings a unique dimension to the passing game.

    This game features a pair of head coaches who know one another quite well. When Bengals fans, like most people outside New York, think Rex Ryan, they think of his hijinks with the media and his always-second-guessed decisions. Who is Rex the coach, in your opinion?

    Cimini: Ryan has changed this season, Coley. He's not the walking sound bite he was in his first few years. A few reasons for that, I think: First, he has a new boss, general manager John Idzik, an old-school, buttoned-down guy who doesn't care for all the yapping. Obviously, Ryan is coaching for his job, so in the interest of self-preservation, he has conformed to fit Idzik's head-coaching model. Second, I think Ryan realized before the season this was going to be a very young team. He knew he wouldn't be doing the players any favors by making bold predictions. Maybe you can do that with a veteran team, as he did in 2009 and 2010, but it doesn't make sense to put that kind of pressure on kids. He also has taken on more of a teaching role, running the defense on a day-to-day basis. So far, it's all working out. I don't think there's any doubt that, through seven games, he's on his way to a contract extension.

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/cincinnati-b...ts-bengals-nfl

  14. #14
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    A History: Jets vs. Bengals

    The Jets lead the all-time series 17-7, while outscoring the Bengals 628-489 in the process.

    December 8, 1968: The Jets (9-3) looked to continue their best season in the franchise's young history facing the Bengals (3-9) late in the season. Led by future Hall of Fame quarterback Joe Namath, New York got off to a quick start in their first ever meeting against the Cincinnati Bengals. Receivers George Sauer and Don Maynard both caught first quarter touchdowns via Broadway Joe. Despite the quick start and superior record, Cincinnati was able to cut the deficit to 10 points after a Paul Robinson rushing score by halftime. In the fourth quarter, now leading 20-7, New York allowed the Bengals to have comeback dreams after a fumble at their own one yard line was recovered for a touchdown. Babe Parilli, who threw 15 times in this game, would toss a touchdown pass of his own later in the quarter, extending the Jet lead to 27-14, and giving Gang Green a win in their first game against the men in orange and black. New York would continue this run into the playoffs, where Namath would come through on his brash guarantee and deliver the Jets first and only Super Bowl title.

    December 21, 1986: The Jets (10-5) faced off against the Bengals (9-6) in Week 17 of the '86 season. Winner of this game would be guaranteed a higher seed in the AFC playoff picture. The game could not have gotten off to a better start for New York, who took a 7-0 lead right out of the gate on a Bobby Humphery 96-yard kickoff return. The Jets and Bengals went back-and-forth throughout the first half, as Freeman McNiel ran for two early touchdowns for New York while Stanley Wilson and Cris Collinsworth (circa Bengal QB Boomer Esiason) reached the end zone as well, leading to the Jets up 21-17 at the half. This is where things would get bad for New York. Esiason and the Bengals offense exploded in the third quarter, converting three touchdowns—all from Esiason—to Collinsworth, Rodney Holman and Anthony Munoz. The Cincinnati bludgeoning continued in the final quarter, as Esiason threw his fifth touchdown pass of the day—and connecting with Collinsworth for the third time—and Larry Kinnebrew rushed in for a score of his own. The Bengals won by a convincing 52-21 score. The Jets went on to defeat the Kansas City Chiefs 35-15 in the Wild Card Round of the playoffs, and then dropped an excruciating game to Cleveland in double overtime.

    December 16, 2001: The Jets (7-5) met against the Bengals (4-8), looking to continue their playoff push. The first half of this game was mostly defense, as the two teams combined for just one touchdown coming off of a one-yard run by Bengal runningback Corey Dillon. Much of the same occurred in the third quarter, as the only score came off another run by Dillon, this time for a robust three yards. The Jets continued to struggle to put points up, as they entered the fourth trailing 14-3. A Jet loss would put a major crimp in their postseason hopes as both the New England Patriots and Miami Dolphins were ahead of them in the AFC East. Realizing this, New York sprung back to life after a Vinny Testaverde touchdown pass (and failed two-point conversion) to James Dearth cut the lead to 14-9. After the Jet defense stood up time in time again, all New York had to do was get one last good drive on offense, and that's exactly what they did. From two yards out of the end zone, Anthony Becht caught a touchdown pass from Testaverde, giving the Jets a one-point edge over Cincinnati. Gang Green went on to win the game and while they finished third in the AFC East at 10-6, they made the playoffs as the #6 seed, where they lost 38-24 to the Oakland Raiders in the opening round of the postseason.

    January 9, 2010: After defeating them in a win-and-in regular season game the week prior, the Jets (9-7) once again faced off against the Bengals (10-6) except this time it was in the postseason. Despite having the #1 overall defense and rushing attack in the NFL, the Jets were playing the role of underdogs on the road. The scoring opened with Laveranues Coles—who had fumbled on a drive earlier in the first—caught a touchdown pass from Carson Palmer in the corner of the end zone, giving Cincy a 7-0 lead. The Jets broke through in the second quarter, as rookie back-up runningback Shonn Greene took a counter-pitch from—fellow rookie Mark Sanchez—39 yards to the house, knotting the game at 7 a piece. Later in the quarter on a play-action fake and roll out, Sanchez found Dustin Keller who caught, ran and tip-toed along the sideline for a 45-yard touchdown, giving the Jets their first lead of the playoffs. In the third quarter, New York added to their lead with a rushing score from Thomas Jones, making it a 21-7 game. Cedric Benson rushed for a touchdown in the fourth, cutting the lead to seven, however it could have been closer had Shayne Graham not missed two field goals. Jay Feely would add a field goal of his own and the Jets wound up defeating the Bengals 24-14, delivering the first playoff win of the Rex Ryan era.

    After throwing at least one touchdown in 52 consecutive games, Tom Brady has now been held to zero two times this year... by the Bengals and Jets. Now these two defenses will face off in a big game on Sunday, pitting third year quarterback Andy Dalton against the rookie Geno Smith. The Jets will have their hands full as they'll have to attempt to contain superstar receiver A.J. Green, all while protecting Smith from Geno Atkins and the rest of the Bengals stout defensive line. Cincinnati is favored by 6.5 points entering Sunday's match-up but if the Jets can protect their quarterback and make sure he makes little to no mistakes, they'll have a chance to get to 5-3.

    > http://www.ganggreennation.com/2013/...ets-vs-bengals

  15. #15
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    I think the key to this game is checking at the LOS. Stop Dalton from getting those quick passes off.



    Harvey: So that’s the way to neutralize the Jets’ front, huh? Bad news for Gang Green: Short, quick passes are the Bengals’ forte. Dalton has thrived throwing them all season. On passes that have traveled 5 yards or less, he has the league’s highest completion percentage at 76.7 percent. On 66 completions from that range, he has thrown for 500 yards. Of those, 316 have come after the catch.

  16. #16
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    A history of the Jets and Bengals: Two teams that have basically sucked since their existence with an occasional spike upwards here and there. Which team will break the long history of mediocrity either way I don't see either team winning the SB this year, again. I see a lot of positives from the Jets and we could be working towards a spike that counts.

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    i just hope we don't get blown out in Cincinnati like we were in Tennessee, that would make me very sad.

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    The New York Jets have been riding the mediocrity train for almost two years, having won back-to-back games only once in a 26-game span. Their record following a victory is 1-9, with an eye-opening average margin of defeat -- 17 points. Can't handle prosperity? That's an understatement. They're allergic to it.

    They can change the perception Sunday in Cincinnati, where they meet the red-hot Bengals (5-2), who have won three straight. As Rex Ryan continues to tell his team, there's no league rule that prohibits winning two in a row. Pushing while trying to block a field goal? Yes. A winning streak? No.

    Kickoff is 4:05 p.m. ET at Paul Brown Stadium. What to watch for:

    Geno Smith has yet to string together back-to-back wins this season.
    1. Call him Geno (The Elevator) Smith: The Jets are up and down because their rookie quarterback is up and down. Geno Smith is 0-3 after wins, having played poorly in each game -- a total of one touchdown and seven interceptions in those contests. He was horrible in his two previous games against top-10 defenses (Pittsburgh Steelers and Tennessee Titans), and the Bengals are ranked No. 9 in total defense. The Bengals had gone 20 straight games without allowing a 300-yard passer, the longest streak in the league, but they surrendered 357 last week to the Detroit Lions' Matthew Stafford. They won't have their top defensive back, cornerback Leon Hall (torn Achilles' tendon), who covered the slot on third down. That could mean another big day for Smith and wide reciever Jeremy Kerley, who was deadly last week in the slot.

    Oh, by the way: Since 2008, under defensive coordinator Mike Zimmer, the Bengals are only 7-8 against rookie quarterbacks.

    2. Battle for defensive-line bragging rights: This game features two of the better lines in the league. The Bengals' four-man front has combined for 12 sacks; the Jets' front (counting rush linebacker Quinton Coples) has 10.5. Bengals defensive tackleGeno Atkins is the most accomplished lineman among both teams. Since 2010, he has more sacks (24.5) than any interior lineman in the league. He'll be a huge challenge for the Jets' guards, Willie Colon and rookie Brian Winters. Truth be told, the Bengals pose problems across the board. Their ends, Carlos Dunlap and Michael Johnson, are tough assignments for Austin Howard and D'Brickashaw Ferguson, respectively. Ferguson is coming off a shaky performance.

    At the same time, the Bengals won't have it easy with Muhammad Wilkerson & Co., but they got a preview two weeks ago when they beat the Buffalo Bills, who run almost the identical scheme as the Jets. Center Kyle Cook did such a good job of reading the Bills' fronts that he received a game ball. The Bengals refer to the Jets' defense as "Buffalo on steroids." That's a compliment, by the way.

    3. A pair of two-headed monsters: The two teams share a similar philosophy in the backfield, each running the ground game through two players. Bilal Powell and Chris Ivory form a workmanlike tandem, steady if not spectacular (no runs longer than 27 yards). The Jets rode Ivory last week, but look for Powell to return to a prominent role. They need his cutback ability against the Bengals' aggressive front. The Jets are aware of a quote from Bengals linebacker Vontaze Burfict, who said: “They’re going to figure out probably in the first 15, 20 snaps that running’s going to be pretty hard against our front seven.”

    The Bengals split the carries between BenJarvus Green-Ellis and rookie Giovani Bernard, a Darren Sproles type. The Bengals are a better offense when Bernard is on the field. They average 5.8 yards per play when he's in, 5.3 when he's out, according to ESPN Stats & Information. They've also been throwing to him more the last two weeks out of the backfield. He'll be a tough cover for the Jets.

    4. Green vs. Green: The Jets have a lot of respect for Bengals wide receiver A.J. Green. Asked what advice he'd give cornerback Antonio Cromartie, who most likely will cover Green, coordinator Dennis Thurman said, "Get your hands on him and pray." This is an enormous game for Cromartie. If he can't contain Green, who has been targeted a league-high 77 times, the Jets have no shot. One out of every four throws to Green is a deep shot, so Cromartie had better stay awake. Green is third in receiving yards (619) and he has a hot quarterback, Andy Dalton, looking for this third straight 300-yard passing day.

    Dalton has five players with at least 20 catches apiece, the kind of balance that will present issues for the Jets. Saferty Antonio Allen did a nice job last week on Rob Gronkowski, but this is Gronkowski times two. The Bengals use a lot of two-tight end packages with Jermaine Gresham and rookie Tyler Eifert, who sometimes lines up as a receiver in an isolation play. That could be a mismatch for a cornerback.

    5. Special teams will be huge: Write it down. Both teams have a tendency to play close games, so field position and field-goal kicking will be vital. Who's hotter than Nick Folk? He's 16-for-16 in field goals, including three game winners. Former Jets place kicker Mike Nugent enters this game coming back-to-back game winnners, so he has to be feeling good about himself. One thing about Nugent: He had no touchbacks in his last home game. His short leg on kickoffs could create some opportunities for new kick returner Josh Cribbs, who is familiar with the surroundings from his years with the Cleveland Browns. Oddly, Cribbs hasn't scored a touchdown of any kind in 18 career games against the Bengals.

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york/jet...innati-bengals

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelly View Post
    The New York Jets have been riding the mediocrity train for almost two years, having won back-to-back games only once in a 26-game span. Their record following a victory is 1-9, with an eye-opening average margin of defeat -- 17 points. Can't handle prosperity? That's an understatement. They're allergic to it.

    They can change the perception Sunday in Cincinnati, where they meet the red-hot Bengals (5-2), who have won three straight. As Rex Ryan continues to tell his team, there's no league rule that prohibits winning two in a row. Pushing while trying to block a field goal? Yes. A winning streak? No.

    Kickoff is 4:05 p.m. ET at Paul Brown Stadium. What to watch for:

    Geno Smith has yet to string together back-to-back wins this season.
    1. Call him Geno (The Elevator) Smith: The Jets are up and down because their rookie quarterback is up and down. Geno Smith is 0-3 after wins, having played poorly in each game -- a total of one touchdown and seven interceptions in those contests. He was horrible in his two previous games against top-10 defenses (Pittsburgh Steelers and Tennessee Titans), and the Bengals are ranked No. 9 in total defense. The Bengals had gone 20 straight games without allowing a 300-yard passer, the longest streak in the league, but they surrendered 357 last week to the Detroit Lions' Matthew Stafford. They won't have their top defensive back, cornerback Leon Hall (torn Achilles' tendon), who covered the slot on third down. That could mean another big day for Smith and wide reciever Jeremy Kerley, who was deadly last week in the slot.

    Oh, by the way: Since 2008, under defensive coordinator Mike Zimmer, the Bengals are only 7-8 against rookie quarterbacks.

    2. Battle for defensive-line bragging rights: This game features two of the better lines in the league. The Bengals' four-man front has combined for 12 sacks; the Jets' front (counting rush linebacker Quinton Coples) has 10.5. Bengals defensive tackleGeno Atkins is the most accomplished lineman among both teams. Since 2010, he has more sacks (24.5) than any interior lineman in the league. He'll be a huge challenge for the Jets' guards, Willie Colon and rookie Brian Winters. Truth be told, the Bengals pose problems across the board. Their ends, Carlos Dunlap and Michael Johnson, are tough assignments for Austin Howard and D'Brickashaw Ferguson, respectively. Ferguson is coming off a shaky performance.

    At the same time, the Bengals won't have it easy with Muhammad Wilkerson & Co., but they got a preview two weeks ago when they beat the Buffalo Bills, who run almost the identical scheme as the Jets. Center Kyle Cook did such a good job of reading the Bills' fronts that he received a game ball. The Bengals refer to the Jets' defense as "Buffalo on steroids." That's a compliment, by the way.

    3. A pair of two-headed monsters: The two teams share a similar philosophy in the backfield, each running the ground game through two players. Bilal Powell and Chris Ivory form a workmanlike tandem, steady if not spectacular (no runs longer than 27 yards). The Jets rode Ivory last week, but look for Powell to return to a prominent role. They need his cutback ability against the Bengals' aggressive front. The Jets are aware of a quote from Bengals linebacker Vontaze Burfict, who said: “They’re going to figure out probably in the first 15, 20 snaps that running’s going to be pretty hard against our front seven.”

    The Bengals split the carries between BenJarvus Green-Ellis and rookie Giovani Bernard, a Darren Sproles type. The Bengals are a better offense when Bernard is on the field. They average 5.8 yards per play when he's in, 5.3 when he's out, according to ESPN Stats & Information. They've also been throwing to him more the last two weeks out of the backfield. He'll be a tough cover for the Jets.

    4. Green vs. Green: The Jets have a lot of respect for Bengals wide receiver A.J. Green. Asked what advice he'd give cornerback Antonio Cromartie, who most likely will cover Green, coordinator Dennis Thurman said, "Get your hands on him and pray." This is an enormous game for Cromartie. If he can't contain Green, who has been targeted a league-high 77 times, the Jets have no shot. One out of every four throws to Green is a deep shot, so Cromartie had better stay awake. Green is third in receiving yards (619) and he has a hot quarterback, Andy Dalton, looking for this third straight 300-yard passing day.

    Dalton has five players with at least 20 catches apiece, the kind of balance that will present issues for the Jets. Saferty Antonio Allen did a nice job last week on Rob Gronkowski, but this is Gronkowski times two. The Bengals use a lot of two-tight end packages with Jermaine Gresham and rookie Tyler Eifert, who sometimes lines up as a receiver in an isolation play. That could be a mismatch for a cornerback.

    5. Special teams will be huge: Write it down. Both teams have a tendency to play close games, so field position and field-goal kicking will be vital. Who's hotter than Nick Folk? He's 16-for-16 in field goals, including three game winners. Former Jets place kicker Mike Nugent enters this game coming back-to-back game winnners, so he has to be feeling good about himself. One thing about Nugent: He had no touchbacks in his last home game. His short leg on kickoffs could create some opportunities for new kick returner Josh Cribbs, who is familiar with the surroundings from his years with the Cleveland Browns. Oddly, Cribbs hasn't scored a touchdown of any kind in 18 career games against the Bengals.

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york/jet...innati-bengals
    thanks Kelly, I was glad to see Josh Cribbs so much energy in the Pats game. I'm hoping to see him make some big plays against the Bengals . Special teams could be the difference. They have home field, so it's going to be close.

  20. #20
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    Among the most compelling numbers from the all-time Cincinnati Bengals-New York Jets series is one; as in the number of times Bengals coach Marvin Lewis has beaten the Jets in his 11 years as a head coach.

    For whatever reason, the Jets have been a bugaboo for Lewis' teams. Regular season, postseason, it doesn't matter. The Jets have found a way to come out on top every time.

    While that's one number to keep in mind, here are a few others you'll want to take note of Sunday afternoon when the Bengals and Jets square off at Paul Brown Stadium:

    5: Combined number of game-winning field goals this season for Cincinnati's Mike Nugent and New York's Nick Folk. Nugent has hit two, one as time expired and one in overtime. Folk has three, two in the final two seconds of regulation, and another in overtime.

    27.1: Percentage of NFL games this season decided by a fourth-quarter comeback victory. That figure puts the 2013 season on pace for the second-highest percentage of games with a fourth-quarter comeback win since the 1970 merger. In 1989, 31.3 percent of games were decided in that fashion.

    74: Number of NFL games that have been within seven points at some point in the fourth quarter. That's the highest total through seven weeks in NFL history.

    3.1: Yards per rush the Jets' defense has allowed. That's the lowest yards-per-rush figure in the NFL. Last year, they ranked 21st in the league, allowing an average 4.3 yards per rushing attempt.

    3: Number of teams that have allowed less than 80 yards rushing per game. The Jets, at 77.7 yards, are one of those teams.

    4.6: Yards per play the Jets' defense has allowed. That figure ranks third in the league.

    1.7: Yards per rush before contact the Jets' defense has allowed. That ranks as the best in the NFL.

    17: Number of sacks the Jets have when sending four or fewer pass-rushers on pressures this season. They have 24 sacks total; the third-most in the league and most through seven games under coach Rex Ryan since 2009.

    4: Game-winning drives Jets rookie quarterback Geno Smith has led. According to Elias, he's the fourth quarterback since the 1970 merger to lead a game-winning drive in each of his first four career wins.

    60.9: Smith's QBR in the Jets' four wins.

    9.7: Smith's QBR in the Jets' three losses. He has seven interceptions and one touchdown in those games.

    14: Turnovers Smith has committed through seven games.

    25: Times Smith has been sacked through seven games. No other player in the league has a higher number of turnovers and sacks.

    .889: Winning percentage for the Jets in the last nine games between them and the Bengals. New York has won eight of the last nine games against Cincinnati, including a 2009 playoff game at Paul Brown Stadium. In the past two regular-season meetings, the Jets have outscored the Bengals, 63-10.

    4: Number of quarterbacks who have thrown for 300 yards and three touchdowns in consecutive games this season. They are: Peyton Manning, Drew Brees, Aaron Rodgers and Bengals quarterback Andy Dalton. Dalton has thrown more touchdowns in his last two games than in his first five games of the season.

    6.9: Yards per passing attempt in Dalton's first five games.

    9.6: Yards per passing attempt in Dalton's past two games.

    65.1: Dalton's completion percentage in the first five games.

    67.6: Dalton's completion percentage in the past two games.

    53.0: Dalton's combined QBR in the first five games.

    82.0: Dalton's combined QBR in the past two games.

    8: Number of players who have thrown 300 yards and three touchdowns in three straight games in a single season since 2001. If Dalton does it Sunday, he'll be the ninth.

    69.2: Dalton's completion percentage on passing plays 15-plus yards downfield in the past two games.

    36.1: Dalton's completion percentage on passing plays 15-plus yards downfield in the first five games.

    77: Times Dalton has targeted receiver A.J. Green. That's tied for the most times an NFL receiver has been targeted this season.

    619: Yards receiving for Green. That ranks third among pass-catchers.

    258: Yards receiving for Green in the past two games.

    > http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york/jets/

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