Enjoy an Ads-Free Jets Insider - Become a Jets Insider VIP!
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: The hypocrisy of the liberal left

  1. #1
    Jets Insider VIP
    JetsInsider.com Legend
    Charter JI Member

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Posts
    31,407
    Post Thanks / Like
    Reprinted from NewsMax.com
    Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2003 6:37 p.m. EST
    Charlie Rangel: Gore, Dean are Harlem Hypocrites

    When Al Gore said during his endorsement of Howard Dean on Tuesday that it was "good to be back in Harlem," Congressman Charlie Rangel and his staff wondered what the ex-VP meant by "back."

    "Of all the congressional districts we have in the country, I would think mine is one that Gore is least familiar with," Rep. Rangel complained to Newsday.

    The leading black Democrat was no kinder to Gore's Vermont sidekick, telling the New York Post, "From what I gather, Howard Dean brought all of his black supporters with him to the announcement. I counted one black guy."

    The fact that the two lily white Democrats were trying to capitalize on their tenuous ties to the African-American community also irked Rangel's aides.

    Deriding Gore's antics, Rangel's chief of staff Jim Capel complained, "This sucker didn't come into Harlem to campaign" when he ran for president in 2000. "And he's coming [here] to endorse?"

    Gov. Dean's pandering rubbed Capel the wrong way as well, saying his choice of the Harlem venue "sort of seems odd in that neither Gore nor Dean has a close association with this community."

  2. #2
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Detroit, Michigan
    Posts
    8,682
    Post Thanks / Like
    Here's some more hypocrisy.

    ELECTION 2004
    Kerry blaming Bush
    for Kerry's own bill
    Blasts president over carcinogenic fuel additive he helped promote

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Posted: December 10, 2003
    10:56 a.m. Eastern


    By Diana Lynne
    2003 WorldNetDaily.com

    In a classic case of the political pot calling the kettle black, Democrat presidential candidate John Kerry blasted the Bush administration over failing to be accountable for the disastrous fallout of the use of a fuel additive deemed carcinogenic, without mentioning he was behind legislation that mandated its widespread use.


    Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., during televised debate of Democratic presidential candidates this week. (Courtesy: WMUR-TV)

    Trailing in the polls and eager to make friends in New Hampshire before that state's primary next month, Sen. Kerry, D-Mass., during Tuesday's Democratic debate referenced the plight of a Salem, N.H., couple, the Denuccios, who can't drink their water or shower because they live next to a lake contaminated with the additive Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether, or MTBE.

    "Kids can't make the lemonade now. They don't take showers with the water. They have to buy bottled water. MTBE is the culprit," Kerry described. "This administration is trying to prevent accountability for MTBE $50 billion worth of add-ons in oil and gas subsidies in the energy bill; $139 billion of return-on-investment for $139 million of lobbying money in Washington."

    Lisa Denuccio appeared with Kerry at a news conference last month during which Kerry pledged to ban MTBE if elected president. (Incidentally, in a post-debate telephone interview, Denuccio told the Associated Press the couple now showers with the water from their town rather than the old polluted well. They still drink bottled water, however.)

    According to Kerry, one-sixth of the water bodies in the Granite State are polluted by MTBE or other pollution.

    But what Kerry failed to mention is that he co-sponsored legislation that led to the widespread use of MTBE by oil and gas companies as a relatively inexpensive way to reduce air pollution.

    Passed by Congress and signed into law by President George H.W. Bush in 1990, the Clean Air Restoration and Standards Attainment Act of 1989 amended the Clean Air Act by setting oxygenated-fuel standards. Oxygen makes gas burn more thoroughly, which in turn reduces air pollution.

    The law mandated the use of oxygenates by energy companies, and MTBE was the most commonly used additive.

    WorldNetDaily reported that while MTBE was mandated in fuel sold all over the United States because it was predicted to reduce harmful emissions, leading scientists agree that prediction hasn't come to fruition.

    Rather, the mandated use of MTBE has backfired. Dr. Joel Kauffman, professor of chemistry at the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, told WorldNetDaily MTBE seems to have little or no effect in reducing carbon monoxide emissions and, in contrast, is actually increasing nitrogen oxides emissions, which contribute to smog.

    What's worse is the additive, which has leeched into water supplies in California and elsewhere, is believed to be a carcinogen.

    "If it gets into the water and people drink the water, there is an increased risk of cancer," Dr. Nachman Brautbar, a clinical toxicologist and editor of International Journal of Occupational Medicine, told WorldNetDaily.

    In July 1999, an advisory panel warned the Environmental Protection Agency that MTBE constitutes a "risk to our environment and public health" and recommended its use be reduced or eliminated.

    After being one of the first states to use MTBE, California has banned the additive as of Jan. 1 this year. A ban in Connecticut takes effect New Year's Day, while New York also is outlawing the additive.

  3. #3
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    4,530
    Post Thanks / Like
    What a joke. These liberals mandated this supposedly-neviro-friendly additive, and now want to complain when they refused to see the unintended consequences-sharp raises in the price of gas and MTBE getting in the ground water.

    Kerry is the worst. Just marry another rich widow and shut up already.

  4. #4
    All League
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Chicago (Via Harlem, Via Madison WI)
    Posts
    2,569
    Post Thanks / Like
    As a long-time resident of Harlem i'm glad to see Rep. Rangel call these guys out. I'd say that this community collectively has the widest range of "Black Thought" in the entire country, and the people here aren't gonna fall for the quad-annual liberal pat on the head.

    However, this doesn't make Bush any less of a joke. He's never stepped foot in this community. And in all actually, he represents so many of the things that stunts the growth of communities like mine. False ideals of empowerment, and the legacy/AA paradox are both big issues in the eyes of a person like myself.

  5. #5
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    11,692
    Post Thanks / Like
    [quote][i]Originally posted by TerryBadway[/i]@Dec 11 2003, 08:31 AM
    [b] As a long-time resident of Harlem i'm glad to see Rep. Rangel call these guys out. I'd say that this community collectively has the widest range of "Black Thought" in the entire country, and the people here aren't gonna fall for the quad-annual liberal pat on the head.

    However, this doesn't make Bush any less of a joke. He's never stepped foot in this community. And in all actually, he represents so many of the things that stunts the growth of communities like mine. False ideals of empowerment, and the legacy/AA paradox are both big issues in the eyes of a person like myself. [/b][/quote]
    Terry -

    What is the legacy/AA paradox? Is it that you find it logically inconsistent for a person like Bush to oppose AA, yet support "legacy" admission policies? If so, I agree 100%. (FYI - I think BOTH are horribly discriminatory)

  6. #6
    All League
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Chicago (Via Harlem, Via Madison WI)
    Posts
    2,569
    Post Thanks / Like
    [quote][b]What is the legacy/AA paradox? Is it that you find it logically inconsistent for a person like Bush to oppose AA, yet support "legacy" admission policies? If so, I agree 100%. (FYI - I think BOTH are horribly discriminatory) [/b][/quote]

    That's right 5ever, I knew you'd get it ;)

    I can understand his overt position on it because he was a legacy beneficiary himself. So as a man, I don't have a big gripe with him here. But I feel as though the community (And society in general) as a whole should make him accountable for this. Especially when you considered how stedfast he was in his fight against the Univ of Michigan's policies. But more importantly how vague his constituancy was in describing all the facts behind the policy. The way they painted the picture made the average viewer assume that black students were getting a free ride towards admission, yet they failed to mention that legacy and poor white students were getting the equivalent preference.

  7. #7
    Jets Insider VIP
    JetsInsider.com Legend
    Charter JI Member

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Posts
    31,407
    Post Thanks / Like
    [quote][i]Originally posted by TerryBadway[/i]@Dec 11 2003, 10:06 AM
    [b] [quote][b]What is the legacy/AA paradox? Is it that you find it logically inconsistent for a person like Bush to oppose AA, yet support "legacy" admission policies? If so, I agree 100%. (FYI - I think BOTH are horribly discriminatory) [/b][/quote]

    That's right 5ever, I knew you'd get it ;)

    I can understand his overt position on it because he was a legacy beneficiary himself. So as a man, I don't have a big gripe with him here. But I feel as though the community (And society in general) as a whole should make him accountable for this. Especially when you considered how stedfast he was in his fight against the Univ of Michigan's policies. But more importantly how vague his constituancy was in describing all the facts behind the policy. The way they painted the picture made the average viewer assume that black students were getting a free ride towards admission, yet they failed to mention that legacy and poor white students were getting the equivalent preference. [/b][/quote]
    I disagree he made it seem like black students were getting a free ride. The policy was clearly spelled out as to how all things being equal and even a little unequal, minority students were getting the edge/benefit.

    And you are right, Bush never stepped foot in Harlem, which makes the Gore/Dean use of Harlem just prove what hypocrites they are.

    Explain this to me Terry...and I'm not asking in a sarcastic tone rather a serious nature.

    You have the democratic party who was in complete control of the south when they were burning down black churches, releasing the dogs on civil rights marchers and ironically set up these welfare entitlement programs that have become big business and unfortunately kept a large portion of inner-city residents reliant on hand-outs like welfare, etc.
    And while the democrats talk a good game and say the right things you now have a Republican President who encourages faith-based programs (which are big in the inner cities) and has elevated two completely qualified black people (one from your neighborhood) to the highest levels yet in American government.

    So why does the Harlem community continue to buy into the liberal garbage that basically keeps them down? No one is going anywhere on welfare yet they will achieve and grow through business ownership, etc.

  8. #8
    All League
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Chicago (Via Harlem, Via Madison WI)
    Posts
    2,569
    Post Thanks / Like
    [quote][b]So why does the Harlem community continue to buy into the liberal garbage that basically keeps them down? No one is going anywhere on welfare yet they will achieve and grow through business ownership, etc. [/b][/quote]

    Come Back

    If you read my first post in this thread you'll get a feel for my stance on both parties. They're both not without major flaws, and key off deception. If an individual stands behind any party too long they get stuck in a phase of virtual inertia.

    As far as Colly and Conda are concerned, I'd like to think that they would've been thrusted into power at some point in time regardless of GWB. Those two very qualified individuals earned those jobs regardless of skin color. Should I really give Bush Kudos for this?

    And finally to the point of empowerment in Harlem. Not sure if you visited the neighboorhood lately, but it's come a long way. I'd say we have a good mix of upwardly mobile individuals, working class families, and "po folks". But I don't think the disparity in income and education is as bad in Harlem as it maybe in other poor urban neighboorhoods. I'd give you an invite to come up anytime, and I'll be more than happy to show you the sites and culture.

    The government empowerment issue I feel is a farce however. The Harlem empowerment zone has done a lot to bring in the Big-Box companies (Home Depot, HMV, The Gap, Staples, H&M, Disney, Starbucks), however, they've basically screwed the local small business owner, and aspiring entrepenuers of my community.

    Case in point: My best freind had a novel idea for a business up here. He was a polished young brother who attended Morehouse and was then working as an associate at Goldman Sachs. He'd become an expert in the field of brewing (as a hobby) and invested a great deal of money in award winning receipes purchased from several brewmasters. [b]His idea[/b], was to build a brewpub at the edge of Central Park North (Post redevelopment). The problem....Calvin Butts and the Harlem Empowerment Zone. When you have government officials with ties to the lobby (Budweiser), the aspiring entrepenuer with a novel and impressive idea gets shot down.

    Because of this come back....I don't have trust in any party, i'll judge the candidate on his merits (Btw...I don't think the dems are putting out a candidate i'd vote for...).

    When it comes to the UMich issue, we'll just have to disagree there. There was an anti-affirmative action push there as well as anti-quota (I'm completely anti-qouta btw). If GWB was just anti-qouta, why did he make African American policy the preaching agenda. Let's be real, there are only about 180 minority students at UMBS (1,870 pop....9% URM). There are clearly multiple times more legacy and poor white students there, and they acquired the same amount (and in some cases more) of points as the black students.

  9. #9
    Jets Insider VIP
    JetsInsider.com Legend
    Charter JI Member

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Posts
    31,407
    Post Thanks / Like
    [b]If you read my first post in this thread you'll get a feel for my stance on both parties. They're both not without major flaws, and key off deception. If an individual stands behind any party too long they get stuck in a phase of virtual inertia.[/b] I totally agree with you.

    [b]As far as Colly and Conda are concerned, I'd like to think that they would've been thrusted into power at some point in time regardless of GWB. Those two very qualified individuals earned those jobs regardless of skin color. Should I really give Bush Kudos for this?[/b] But why weren't they? which goes back to my point on clinton...who said the right things but did nothing.


    [b]And finally to the point of empowerment in Harlem. Not sure if you visited the neighboorhood lately, but it's come a long way. I'd say we have a good mix of upwardly mobile individuals, working class families, and "po folks". But I don't think the disparity in income and education is as bad in Harlem as it maybe in other poor urban neighboorhoods. I'd give you an invite to come up anytime, and I'll be more than happy to show you the sites and culture.[/b] I'm constantly in Harlem and have been for the past 20+ years. My dad was a NYPD in the 28 & 23 precints' and I have clients in the area as well as use it to take the train into Manhattan. I've see the transformation of the neighborhood. The buildings and housing have gone from dilapidated towers and houses to beautiful brownstones and fantastic looking apartment complexes.

    [b]The government empowerment issue I feel is a farce however. The Harlem empowerment zone has done a lot to bring in the Big-Box companies (Home Depot, HMV, The Gap, Staples, H&M, Disney, Starbucks), however, they've basically screwed the local small business owner, and aspiring entrepenuers of my community.[/b] But those places have also brought a lot of jobs and tax revenue into the area. It's no different where I live in Westchester...Home Depot comes in and there goes the mom and pop hardware store that was in town for 25-years. Walmart comes in and a bunch of small business go out cause they can't compete.

    [b]Because of this come back....I don't have trust in any party, i'll judge the candidate on his merits (Btw...I don't think the dems are putting out a candidate i'd vote for...).[/b] I am also in total agreement with you on this; I'm a registered Republican but have crossed party lines and voted for other candidates in the past and will do so in the future. My problem is the hypocrisy of it all and while the Republicans are guilty of it what we see now from the liberals turns my stomach.

  10. #10
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    4,530
    Post Thanks / Like
    Badway-

    Your friend's plight is the kind of thing that makes me nuts in NYC. Here, a guy holds himself and his life savings out, and asks for nothing. And yet they tell him to go eff himself so instead they can go and get some developer with tax subsidies and connections to open some huge conglamerate store with low wage folks. Is that really what government is about-picking the winners and losers based on who has lined their pockets, and then weighting the game in the favor of their pals?

    Now, I don't have a problem with a great deal of the developement of even big box stores like Costco, or all the huge phamracies which now abound. But know that Costco has basically destroyed any neighborhood butcher shops, and Riteaid/CVS/Duane Reade have obliterated your local drug store. And many of these stores did it with the help of tax subsidies and abatement of realty taxes so they would hire community residents who they're paying relative dirt. while your former butcher and pharmacist paid those taxes and hire fewer local people but paid them better and was part of the community.

    Along the same lines, yesterday here in Brooklyn they announced this huge Nets arena proposal. While it's true that the railyards the arena would cover are essentially vacant, the City would have to condemn numerous buildings in the surrounding area. And they claim it will cost taxpayers nothing-right. And the developer, a guy named Bruce Ratner, is already getting tax subsidies for the nearby Metrotech area, which has numeorus City agencies as his paying tenants there-Fire, Police, Probation, Brookln DA, Courts, the Transit Authority. Many of which were previously in lousy but rent-free city-owned buildings until Ratner hatched "Metrotech"(which the City likes to pretend will one day spawn some budding Bill Gates just due to the name). Getting government money in both pockets that they weren't paying in the past-can't beat it.And he also is developing the New York Times new building on 42nd Street and 8th Avenue. It's good to haev friends-especially the most infuential paper in the world. But he claims there wouldn't be any tax dollars involved in the Nets arena-sure. Just screwe the people on Vanderbilt Avenue who are about thom get sent packing by eminent domain. Somehow, guys like your friend, the would-be restauranteur/brewer, will aways get the back of the government's hand(unless he made the mistake of allowing a patron to smoke a cigar, in which case he'd be fined) , and connected developers like Ratner will get to do what ever they want. And that sucks.

    We live in the most regulated business-unfriendly city in America. And guys like Bloomberg think they can get away with this forever. But everyone, even poor people, will at some point resort to moving van therapy. You can't treat small business like that and not expect that such people will take their plans, money and homes elsewhere. It cannot go on like this. Bloomberg has this nutty Manhattan/below 96th Street-centric idea that NYC will be some boutique city for the rich. WHich is preposterous. The City is already behind the country in the ongoing rebound. WIth broadband connections, Wall Street doesn't have to physically be here anymore. If the cost and hassle of doing business here keeps going this way, smart people of all backgrounds will leave.

    It really is reaching a tipping point. And I'm not sure anyone sees this -yet.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Follow Us