Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 30

Thread: Question for dem's

  1. #1
    All League
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Middletown Md
    Posts
    673
    Post Thanks / Like
    I was just wondering if the people out there who lean to the left are:

    1.....Excited and energized about the more than likely nomination that Gov Dean will win and will be ready to do what they can to support him in his run for the presidency should he recieve the nomination.

    or

    2.....Shocked and horrified that a candidate who appears to be very McGovernesque will more likely than not win the nomination and thus resigning themselves to another term for President Bush.

    If it were me, the Dean nomination would leave me a little bitter because there were other options out there { Gephardt / Kerry / Lieberman } that I think would have given the president a stiffer challenge.

  2. #2
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Philly
    Posts
    38,782
    Post Thanks / Like
    Dean is an all day sucker and like Gore would make a crappy president. The only candidate with half a chance in hell is Wesley Clark. Any other Dem wins the nomination and its 4 more years. Only the General can really take the fight to Bush.

  3. #3
    Jets Insider VIP
    JetsInsider.com Legend
    Charter JI Member

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Posts
    31,407
    Post Thanks / Like
    [quote][i]Originally posted by bitonti[/i]@Dec 11 2003, 01:02 PM
    [b] Dean is an all day sucker and like Gore would make a crappy president. The only candidate with half a chance in hell is Wesley Clark. Any other Dem wins the nomination and its 4 more years. Only the General can really take the fight to Bush. [/b][/quote]
    The funny thing is the Rats can't even see the fact that Joe Lieberman offers them the best chance; a rightoues individual and very much a conservative democrat who cares about America rahter than his party. As much as I dislike this pathetic group of libs it would be tough to say anything really bad about Lieberman.

    BTW: This is coming from a Bush-backer.

  4. #4
    Board Moderator
    Jets Insider VIP
    Charter JI Member

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    State Location Here
    Posts
    8,017
    Post Thanks / Like
    I laugh at the thought. He's taken himself so far left to get to the front of the pack, that even when he (inevitably) tries to haul ass back to a centrist position, he'll never be able to shake the strong ties he's made with the far loony left, and will never win over the "red states" between NY and CA.

    He's the best thing that can happen for the Repubs

  5. #5
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    11,692
    Post Thanks / Like
    It'll be tough for the Dem candidate to win Florida or Pennsylvania this time around and all of a sudden California is no lock, although I highly doubt Bush will win it.

    I think Dean presents more of a challenge than GOPers think, and I do think the popular vote difference will be less than 12% btween the two candiates. However, I do predict that Bush will win over 40 states and that this, while not a landslide in statistical terms, will be a convincing victory, similar to Clinton versus Dole.

  6. #6
    All League
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    851
    Post Thanks / Like
    I'm happy with Dean or Clark winning the nomination, and will be participating in voter drives, volunteering locally, and contributing additional money to the campaign for either guy (I've already matched jets5ever's sarcastic $50 donation for Dean). Some sort of ticket with both of them on it would be a dream team for me. Both of them IMO are 100% more intelligent, polished, concerned for America, and have done something in their lives to merit being elected the top official in the United States than George W. Bush. They also both come from outside the typical played-out power brokerage within the Party, even though by the time they get the nomination it will be business as usual ... the necessary evils of a two-party system.

    If Leiberman wins the ticket, I'd flat out not vote for him. But he's never been close to the front runner, and Gore's endorsement for somebody else was more or less the kiss of death for his candidacy. Kerry and Gephardt don't thrill me to death, but I'd vote for them if they got the nomination. Kucinich and Braun are too marginal to argue about, and Sharpton is the only guy in the field I have less respect for than Lieberman.

    I have no interest in arguing with anyone smug enough to believe Bush is a lock in '04, though I'm still curious what exactly in Dean's platform you see as "far left". Only in modern reactionary America is concern for healthcare and skepticism about why we're in Iraq seen as a "far left" viewpoint. The guy is good on gun rights and balanced his state's budget, something a lot more fiscally responsible than any of Bush's laughable adventures in the oil industry, the Texas governer's mansion, and now the White House.

    I'll be here either way on the Wednesday morning in November after it's all said and done. Keep calling Dean and his supporters "communists" and enjoy your hero-worship and emotional stake in your noble, articulate, hard working, integrity-restoring current President in the mean time. :rolleyes:

  7. #7
    All League
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Middletown Md
    Posts
    673
    Post Thanks / Like
    [quote][i]Originally posted by bitonti[/i]@Dec 11 2003, 01:02 PM
    [b] Dean is an all day sucker and like Gore would make a crappy president. The only candidate with half a chance in hell is Wesley Clark. Any other Dem wins the nomination and its 4 more years. Only the General can really take the fight to Bush. [/b][/quote]
    I understand where your coming from but I disagree.

    I may be wrong but I see Clark as kind of a shallow candidate who basically is out there because he was convinced by others he actually had a shot to win but when asked serious questions and has his experiences examined by others comes off as unqualified for the highest office in the land, Kinda like Ross Perot with a party.

    On the other hand I would think Lieberman would be in a good position if nominated to take it to Bush, Once you get past his post nasal / whiney voice his positions resonate with a hell of a lot more people than any other democratic candidate, I think he'd still lose to Bush but atleast he'd be competitive and wouldn't embarress the democrats by losing in a landslide.

    Of course, this is all speculation and personal opinion so we'll just have to wait and see what happens but IMHO Dean is made to order for President Bush to rip to shreds in McGovern / Dukakis fashion.

  8. #8
    All League
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    851
    Post Thanks / Like
    One more point to throw out there: I think a lot of you guys like Lieberman for the same reason I liked McCain: he's essentially a guy in "the other" party you reminds you most of what you like about your party.

    I wish 100 times over that McCain had gotten the nomination over Bush. I still wouldn't have voted for him because I wanted to see Nader get the 5% so another party I often (but not always) agree with could get some of the slush funding and get heard more. But I think he would have made 100 times better a President than Bush, and I still respect him as a Senator.

    I don't think Lieberman is evil or anything, he just strikes me as a very uninspiring socially conservative old codge; not somebody who can mobilize the liberal and centrist elements of America, and not a guy who can get those 140,000,000 (think about that number for a moment!) people of legal voting age WHO DID NOT VOTE IN THE LAST ELECTION to come out and exercise their most essential civic duty.

    Dean and Clark IMO are guys who can do that, and I am still hoping for Clark to get a VP opportunity if Dean wins the nomination.

  9. #9
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    11,692
    Post Thanks / Like
    Dean is polished? Hmm...that seems to be the biggest knock against him from his own side!

    Jet Set - bravo on your euphemisms, though...you managed to get a lot of mileage out of "concern." ;)

    I don't think it will be a blowout, I just think Bush will win. If that makes me smug, well, then, I guess I'm smug. I'll be here too following the election.

    Let me ask you this - you really don't think there is an emotional, hero-worship aspect to the attachment Dean's supporters have to him? You don't think your last paragraph was emotional or smug? You honestly don't have an emotional response to Bush?

    (You love the "Bush is stupid" angle, huh? You always and without fail seem to fall back to it.) This argument has been going on for years from people who don't like conservatives. Reagan is dumb, Ford is dumb, Quayle is dumb, Bush is dumb. I guess it's easier than making an argument.

    Incidentally, Howard Dean called Putin the President of the Soviet Union and referred to the Soviet Union half a dozen times during an interview. Polished? Does this mean he's a moron? No, he simply misspoke.

    Dean isn't as far left as Kucinich, but then again I have trouble figuring out what color the sky is in Kucinich's world. Sharpton is running so he can make more money for himself and is a reprehensible racist. The fact that these candidates take him seriously and don't laugh him off the stage or say, "I'm sorry, but I just don't respect you on a personal, moral or professional level" is such transparent pandering that it de-values the entire Democratic party. Edwards is a former ambulance-chaser who knows he's going to lose his Senate seat anyway and so he is running (the party establishment backed him intially too, when they became skeptical of Lieb and Kerry.) Gore is politically meaningless - his own party begged him not to run in 2004.

    The rise of Dean can be attributed to many things, but one of them the Dem power-brokers failing to unite behind a guy early on. Kerry, Gep, Lieb, Edwards = all losers.


    I do respect the challenges that Dean poses for Bush and I do not think that it is a "lock" in any way. I just truly do think Bush will win.

  10. #10
    All League
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    851
    Post Thanks / Like
    I have no problem with you thinking Bush will win, but I already see you singing a different tune now than when you were donating $50 to Dean because you found the idea of his candidacy so "laughable". So clearly you acknowledge his candidacy and legitimate "chances" have come a long way since the prognosis last June.

    You can ridicule "Bush is dumb" claims all you want, but the fact is the guy is a much bigger jerk and anti-intellectual twit than Reagan, Bush I, or Ford. And all those guys actually worked a day in their lives before becoming the quaint, lovable Republican figureheads they were.

    The fact that Bush elicits an emotional response should be no surprise at all; Clinton did as well, and I still attribute a lot of the votes for Bush in 2000 to be votes "against" Clinton's legacy via Gore. The fact is Bush has angered a lot of people in this country .. you can call them all brainwashed tools of the evil liberal establishment/conspiracy/media, but they still have votes and may just be willing to use them.

    As for my respect of Dean, he's not a "hero" to me per se. But I've been following his candidacy since last January, have read every paper and stance published at his website on the issues, have heard him speak, and decided to donate some time/money to his cause. I think his path to sealing the Democratic bid has been extremely well-played, and relied on many grassroots efforts to take advantage of the awkward opening moves of Kerry, Lieberman, et al.

    I also think he's nowhere near to the "far left" as the Coulter-masturbating fear-mongers would like to believe, nor is he even "positioning himself" there right now. He supports gun rights, taking the hard line with North Korea, balancing the budget, and restoring the US's leadership of the free world with its diplomacy and military/economic might. All talking points of course, but I have not seen George W. Bush accomplish one of those things in his 3.2 years, and in fact screw a lot of them up to my perception.

    I absolutely have concern about whether any Democrat can win; I think there's a lot of reactionary sentiment in America stemming understandably from 9/11, and Bush's war chest is insanely vast. And he has Karl Rove ministering propaganda. But I absolutely 100% believe Dean can be a better candidate than Kerry, Lieberman, or Gephardt -- and I think he's far less of a stiff than Dukakis, Gore, Mondale, or McGovern to be compared to those losers.

  11. #11
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Kingston, NY
    Posts
    3,975
    Post Thanks / Like
    Until the people start voting its too early to say who the nominee will be.

    I'd like to add that last night I watched Kerry's appearance on C-Span and I'd relish the chance to see him in a one on one debate with George Bush.

    John Kerry is a remarkable man who could tear Bush apart point by point.

  12. #12
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    11,692
    Post Thanks / Like
    [quote][i]Originally posted by Jet Set Junta[/i]@Dec 11 2003, 02:02 PM
    [b]

    I absolutely have concern about whether any Democrat can win; I think there's a lot of reactionary sentiment in America stemming understandably from 9/11, and Bush's war chest is insanely vast. And he has Karl Rove ministering propaganda. But I absolutely 100% believe Dean can be a better candidate than Kerry, Lieberman, or Gephardt -- and I think he's far less of a stiff than Dukakis, Gore, Mondale, or McGovern to be compared to those losers. [/b][/quote]
    I agree and yes, I admit that his candidacy has come a long way since then.

    He was just up here raising money in Kerry's backyard last night at Davio's.

  13. #13
    All League
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    851
    Post Thanks / Like
    BTW, 5ever, what's your take on Hunter S. Thompson's books? I remember you being a fan of Gilliam's adaptation of "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas" (I think?).

    I'm re-reading "Fear and Loathing on the 1972 Campaign Trail" right now, and forgot how hilarious and surreal some of it is. So all these "Dean = McGovern" cries I keep hearing lately about the pending 2004 trail are interesting to me.

    Not that I consider it an authoritative "source" on what was going on back then (duh), but it's a great read and a lot of the smaller quips made it in seem more true than ever now.

  14. #14
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Philly
    Posts
    38,782
    Post Thanks / Like
    what you guys are missing is this isn't about policy or smarts or parties any of the issues - its about dumb s**t like who has a better haircut and who's face is more symetrical (studies have shown that the 3 most symetrical bone structres over the past 40 years were JFK, Clinton and Elvis) - its about standing up and speaking 100% bull**** and people still relate to you on a personal level. Its about Charisma, the cult of personality.

    Ronnie had it
    Clinton had it
    George Bush II has it

    almost NONE of the Dem candidates have it (besides Sharpton - who we all know is unelectable for a litany of other reasons)

    has anyone seen Kukinich's haircut? Jesus man you are on TV maybe you shouldn't get your hair done and the Blind Barber College.

    Lieberman and Kerry are far too dorky. Dean comes off a total a**hole. Gepheart has a bad name. John Edwards is on the plus side of charisma but falls short in other ways.

    i repeat - the only candidate that stands a chance is Wesley Clark. He's a little on the shrimpy side but he will have to do - at least his face is symetrical. He's got a good short name that's easy to pronounce and would look good on a placard or banner (a Dean strength btw) - he's basically a republican which is good cause they are the only people who can win elections in this country now-adays.

    The guy appeals to everyone - southerners cause he's from AK, northerners cause he's lived in the North - all in all he can make a statement and the impression people get time and time again is that he is a serious man who knows what he is talking about. On the plus-side he doesn't have to borrow anyone's uniforms for photo ops -

    Hopefully he wins the nomination and gets his general uniform out the mothballs for the debates. its the only chance the Democratic party really has.

    mind you this is a small chance anyway you look at it. Bush has more money than God and Rove will find a million and one effective ways to spend it.

  15. #15
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    11,692
    Post Thanks / Like
    [quote][i]Originally posted by Jet Set Junta[/i]@Dec 11 2003, 02:39 PM
    [b] BTW, 5ever, what's your take on Hunter S. Thompson's books? I remember you being a fan of Gilliam's adaptation of "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas" (I think?).

    I'm re-reading "Fear and Loathing on the 1972 Campaign Trail" right now, and forgot how hilarious and surreal some of it is. So all these "Dean = McGovern" cries I keep hearing lately about the pending 2004 trail are interesting to me.

    Not that I consider it an authoritative "source" on what was going on back then (duh), but it's a great read and a lot of the smaller quips made it in seem more true than ever now. [/b][/quote]

    Jet Set - (sorry I called you Bit originally)

    I liked the Fear and Loathing book. I do like Terry Gilliam and Depp and the book, but wasn't that impressed with the movie, although I did enjoy it. It was okay.

    I am just not into the hard stuff now as I was when I was in college and playing in bands (we used to drop tabs and eat shrooms, have nose candy and play out all the time, etc) Hell, when we wanted to "take it easy" we'd drink and smoke tweeds...

    Nowadays I am considerably more tame, although I do partake a handful of times...probably twice a month and enjoy drinking casually most weekends.

    If the movie had come out back when I was wilder, I probably would have felt differently about it. But the guy spins a good yarn - there is no doubt about that and he's pretty funny.

  16. #16
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, N.C.
    Posts
    2,411
    Post Thanks / Like
    one piece of advice to clark if he gets elected with Hillary as VP.......dont go anywhere without bodyguards, hire a food taster, dont go near any state parks.........

  17. #17
    All League
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Middletown Md
    Posts
    673
    Post Thanks / Like
    [quote][i]Originally posted by southernjet[/i]@Dec 11 2003, 04:35 PM
    [b] one piece of advice to clark if he gets elected with Hillary as VP.......dont go anywhere without bodyguards, hire a food taster, dont go near any state parks......... [/b][/quote]
    LOL

  18. #18
    All League
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Middletown Md
    Posts
    673
    Post Thanks / Like
    [quote][i]Originally posted by tailgators[/i]@Dec 11 2003, 03:21 PM
    [b] John Kerry is a remarkable man who could tear Bush apart point by point. [/b][/quote]
    Now.....If you could convince him to stop dropping F-Bombs during interviews...................

  19. #19
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Kingston, NY
    Posts
    3,975
    Post Thanks / Like
    [quote][i]Originally posted by MARYLAND JET+Dec 12 2003, 10:47 AM--></span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>[b]QUOTE[/b] (MARYLAND JET @ Dec 12 2003, 10:47 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin--tailgators[/i]@Dec 11 2003, 03:21 PM
    [b] John Kerry is a remarkable man who could tear Bush apart point by point. [/b][/quote]
    Now.....If you could convince him to stop dropping F-Bombs during interviews................... [/b][/quote]
    It&#39;s funny how people who want to ruin others pick up on the littlest things to score cheap points.

    Did you read the interview? If not here it is&#33;

    John Kerry&#39;s Desperate Hours
    The one-time Democratic front-runner is fighting for his survival

    December 02, 2003

    Rolling Stone Magazine
    by Will Dana

    On a Friday in November, at the end of a tough week, John Kerry projects an aura of friendly confidence that suggests he is either out of touch with reality or has the serenity of a Zen master. In the last five days, Kerry has fired his campaign manager and then seen two staffers walk out the door. He has decided to opt out of the public financing for his campaign -- ostensibly to keep up with his chief rival, blunt, plain-spoken former Vermont governor Howard Dean, who made a similar decision earlier in the week, but also, as Time will report a few days later, because his campaign is having trouble persuading anyone to write a check.

    Until pretty much the moment he started running in earnest earlier this year, Kerry&#39;s campaign for the Democratic Party&#39;s presidential nomination had about it an aura of inevitability. Most watchers attributed the four-term Massachusetts senator&#39;s overconfidence to a hubris born of his patrician roots. The shorthand became: Because this guy went to a fancy prep school and then was tapped to join Skull and Bones at Yale, he just naturally assumes the nomination is his. But in person, Kerry projects something different: He doesn&#39;t seem elitist or aloof. Just the opposite, in fact. He is eager to connect, intense and hopped-up, pulling near-strangers in tight for old-friends-style handshakes, throwing around a lot of "man" and "dude." In these moments, the detail about Kerry that seems most important is not his elitist roots but the fact that he&#39;s a sixty-year-old guy who likes to snowboard.

    Kerry brings to the race a dramatic life story and a resume so perfectly burnished that he seems almost a fictional creation. Born into an old-line family of Boston Brahmins, he was educated at Swiss boarding schools before attending St. Paul&#39;s and then Yale. As a teenager, he sailed off Newport, Rhode Island, with President John F. Kennedy. A few years later, as a young naval officer, he became a bona fide war hero in Vietnam, then returned home in 1969 and emerged as a prominent anti-war activist. He co-founded Vietnam Veterans Against the War, testified in Congress, headlined a peace rally with John Lennon and became a target of the Nixon White House ("Destroy the young demagogue before he becomes another Ralph Nader," wrote Nixon aide Charles Colson in a memo to the president).

    Kerry was elected to the Senate in 1984 after working as a prosecutor and serving as lieutenant governor of Massachusetts. In the Senate, he became known for his high-profile investigations: He was one of the first members of Congress to probe the Iran-Contra scandal; in 1988, he helped uncover the massive BCCI banking scandal. In the Nineties, he joined Arizona senator John McCain to investigate -- and put to rest -- claims that American POWs were still being held in Vietnam. More recently, he led the fight to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from oil drilling.

    But it&#39;s another recent vote that most seems to have gotten Kerry into trouble with Democratic voters -- his decision to back the president&#39;s resolution to go to war in Iraq. Kerry offers a logical and well-reasoned rationale for favoring the war. But the stump is probably not the best place for nuance, and so Kerry&#39;s on-the-one-hand, on-the-other-hand stance has come off as overly calculated when contrasted with Dean&#39;s sledgehammer anti-war bluster.

    With less than two months to go until he faces voters in Iowa and then New Hampshire, Kerry is refashioning himself as a bare-knuckled longshot -- the insider as outsider. Neither a bleeding heart, an insurgent, a new face nor a technocrat, Kerry is selling himself to voters as the guy who knows how the game is played in Washington. His challenge will be to show them that&#39;s not all he knows.

    It seems that the fact that you voted in support of the president&#39;s war resolution has caused you a lot of trouble in your campaign. Do you regret supporting the president?

    What I regret most of all is the way the administration dealt with it -- the extraordinary failure of the administration to keep its promises, to be mature and thoughtful about how you take a nation to war. They misled us; they presented false intelligence to us. The president made a series of promises to us -- number one, that he was gonna make every effort possible to build a legitimate coalition. He did not -- he built a fraudulent coalition. Second, he was gonna exhaust the remedies of the United Nations and the inspection process. He did not. And third, that he would go to war as a last resort. He did not.

    I voted to protect the security of our country, based on the notion that the only way to get inspectors back in was to have a legitimate threat of force and the potential of using it. They took that legitimacy and bastardized it. If I were president, we would not be in Iraq today -- we would not be at war. This president abused the process.

    Had you thought of Bush as someone whose word you could trust at that point?

    It seems to me that we had a right to expect the president of the United States to live up to his word. It was disgraceful, one of the most egregious, fundamentally flawed moments of foreign policy that I can think of in my lifetime.

    You were highly critical of the way they conducted the Afghanistan war, as well.

    But that was a question of strategy, not whether we should be there or not. They had Osama bin Laden and a thousand Al Qaeda fighters cornered in the Tora Bora mountains and allowed them to escape.

    Why do you think that was? Were they afraid of losing troops?

    I think, at that point in time, yes. They ran a risk-averse operation. They didn&#39;t move any of our available legitimate forces into the area. Instead, they sent Afghans -- who, a week earlier, were fighting on the other side -- up into the mountains and said, "Hey, you go get the number-one criminal in the world." It sounds pretty stupid to me, frankly.

    Are you saying that Bush&#39;s conduct of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan -- not to mention the way he has pissed off our allies -- has been incompetent?

    Oh, absolutely. Worse than incompetent. Clouded by ideological excess, a misinterpretation of history, a willful denial of facts.

    Is Iraq turning into another Vietnam?

    Not yet, but it&#39;s on its way, absent major changes in the way they&#39;re doing business.

    The economy is clearly going to be the number-one issue in this election -- it always is. Bush has certainly looked vulnerable on this front. But in the past few weeks, it looks like we&#39;ve started to see some positive economic news. Does this take a big issue away from the Democrats?

    Whether the economy is good or bad, it doesn&#39;t change the fundamentals of my campaign for the presidency. Because I believe this administration is so badly out of touch with the needs of the American people, I think it is so much in the pocket of powerful special interests, I think it is so much working against the interests of average Americans -- that having a stronger economy, in their equation, is not gonna change life for a lot of Americans.

    When the other Democratic candidates talk about Bush, they pretty much just bash his policies. You not only do that, but you also question his basic fitness to serve -- you just said he was incompetent. My question is: When Republicans ran against Clinton, they made a huge issue out of Clinton&#39;s character. Why isn&#39;t the character issue being taken to George Bush?

    If you&#39;re running for the presidency, there are other things you have to focus on. I want to paint an optimistic, hopeful vision for the country and open people&#39;s eyes to the things that we could be doing with respect to, say, energy independence. In the 1930s, we thought it was critical to get electricity out into rural America, right? I think it&#39;s critical to get clean energy out to every part of America. Let&#39;s help create the framework to do it.

    Did you feel you were blindsided by Dean&#39;s success?

    Well, not blindsided. I mean, when I voted for the war, I voted for what I thought was best for the country. Did I expect Howard Dean to go off to the left and say, "I&#39;m against everything"? Sure. Did I expect George Bush to f**k it up as badly as he did? I don&#39;t think anybody did.

    Do you see Dean as the next George McGovern? It&#39;s being said that the Republicans are foaming at the mouth to go against Dean.

    Republicans have been contributing to Dean&#39;s campaign on the Internet. Look, Bush stood up in the White House Rose Garden a week ago and said, "I&#39;m gonna run for re-election on the basis of my pre-emption doctrine and our ability to make the world safer." He has declared his strategy. And unless we have a nominee who can go right at him on that strategy, we&#39;re gonna be in trouble.

    What do you think of Arnold Schwarzenegger becoming governor of California?

    Well, first of all, Arnold&#39;s a friend of mine. I&#39;ve known him for a long time, and he&#39;s a capable guy. I mean, he&#39;s smart and capable. I would have preferred that there had been no recall. I went out and campaigned against it. But I understand the anger that existed out there.

    Do you think that same anger is propelling Dean&#39;s candidacy?

    Other people have to determine that. I&#39;m not an analyst. I&#39;m running for president based on my vision for the country, and I think I have a longer, stronger, deeper record of fighting against those interests, and representing that anger, than Howard Dean.

    You have talked in the past of smoking pot when you returned from Vietnam. What do you think of the way the pot laws are prosecuted today?

    We have never had a legitimate War on Drugs in the United States, ever, and we won&#39;t until we have treatment on demand for addiction and until you have full drug education in our schools. The mandatory-minimum-sentencing structure of our country is funneling people into jail who have no business being there.

    And every year, the number of people arrested for marijuana offenses goes up.

    I&#39;ve met plenty of people in my lifetime who&#39;ve used marijuana and who I would not qualify as serious addicts -- who use about the same amount as some people drink beer or wine or have a cocktail. I don&#39;t get too excited by any of that.

    Would you favor decriminalization?

    No, not quite. What we did in the prosecutor&#39;s office was have a sort of unspoken approach to marijuana that was almost effectively decriminalization. We just didn&#39;t bother with small-time use. It doesn&#39;t rise to the level of nuisance, even. And what we were after was people dealing with heroin and destroying lives, and people who were killing people. That&#39;s where you need to focus.

    What&#39;s most important to you in this campaign?

    This is a critical time for the country. The stakes are just enormous. We need a president, frankly, who has the kind of experience that I&#39;ve had: of being in a war, understanding its downsides but understanding the nature of the threats in the world. Understanding that you couldn&#39;t leave Saddam Hussein to his own devices, but you needed to do this in a very responsible, thoughtful way.

    Does this change the way we relate to the world?

    I&#39;m gonna lift this country up to a greater engagement in the world. I mean, think of what we could do to reach out and begin to present a different face of our country. Think of what we could do to advance the interests of the developing world, so people would see the United States as not just this aggressive, arrogant force that only thinks of itself and doesn&#39;t really have a greater sense of humanity and concern. We&#39;re just not embracing any of that stuff today, and it drives me crazy.

  20. #20
    Jets Insider VIP
    JetsInsider.com Legend
    Charter JI Member

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Posts
    31,407
    Post Thanks / Like
    [i]John Kerry is a remarkable man who could tear Bush apart point by point. [/i]

    John Kerry is a remarkable idiot and miserable failure&#33; I listened to his scorn of the President&#39;s decision not to award Iraqi reconstruction contracts to companies from France/Germany/USSR.

    I was motivated by it so I called his campaign headquarters (617-367-1551) and told them, "I caught Senator Kerry&#39;s speech today and I was really inspired.....I was so inspired that I am going to donate &#036;1,000 to Bush&#39;s relection."

    I left the women speechless.

    BTW: Someone should tell &#39;ol lurch there is no language called muslim&#33;

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Follow Us