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Thread: Hey Bitonti

  1. #1
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    Awesome!

    [url=http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/01/02/stardust.comet/index.html]http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/01/02/s...omet/index.html[/url]

  2. #2
    i did indeed - most dangerous part of the mission is today - if it makes it through without a big f--king rock peircing the solar arrays i know i'll be impressed. The unit has to remain in orbit until 2006... :o

  3. #3
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    I love this kind of thing.

    On a related note, I bought my seven-year old a telescope for Christmas. I've never had one, didn't have a clue, but dropped about $250 to get a decent one (didn't want a piece of crap that would turn him off to the whole idea). Anyway, looking at the craters of the moon was pretty cool, but a couple of nights ago I was actually able to locate Saturn -- we could see the rings! The look on his face when he took his eye away from the eyepiece was priceless. He couldn't believe we could actually see that (and I couldn't believe I actually found it and got it into focus)...

  4. #4
    [b]While the space particles will take two years to travel back to Earth, scientists say a dust counter began signaling Stardust mission control almost immediately with the size and number of particles gathered.[/b]

    Two years? Christ, why didn't they equip the Stardust with a few FedEx envelopes? Guess that would've been too easy.

    [b]"didn't want a piece of crap that would turn him off to the whole idea"[/b]

    That holds true for just about everything. I cringe when I see parents buy their kids cheap musical instruments, thinking it's "only their first one." They don't realize that they're wasting their time, and causing more harm than good. It doesn't give the kid a fair chance.

    Shakin, I'm surprised you didn't buy a computer automated model. I've seen them for well under $300 at Costco (Celestron Nextar 114GT - it's a Newtonian reflector type). My girlfriend has an automated Meade. It's a trip just watching it rotate to the object you command it to find. We try to guess which direction it'll go before pressing the "go to" button.

  5. #5
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by jetworld[/i]@Jan 4 2004, 04:57 PM
    [b]

    Shakin, I'm surprised you didn't buy a computer automated model. I've seen them for well under $300 at Costco (Celestron Nextar 114GT - it's a Newtonian reflector type). My girlfriend has an automated Meade. It's a trip just watching it rotate to the object you command it to find. We try to guess which direction it'll go before pressing the "go to" button. [/b][/quote]
    Yeah, I thought about that, but decided that learning how to recognize the night sky and use a chart to locate objects would be more challenging and educational - - and more rewarding.

    Besides, everything is way too easy for kids these days. I want my kids to know how to figure things out for themselves.

  6. #6
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    shakin... here's a book you may want to pick up for your son.

    Secrets of the Night Sky
    by Bob Berman

    [url=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/006097687X/qid=1073264299/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/002-0210440-5290430?v=glance&s=books]http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detai...=glance&s=books[/url]

  7. #7
    Sometimes those charts are wrong, and more often than that, the sky isn't clear enough to use them.

    We had telescopes as kids, long before the first automated ones came out in the late '80s. Certain objects were easy to recognize (rings of Saturn), but others were pure guesswork. What's cool about automated scopes, is that there's more certainty to what you're seeing, and, because of that, you ultimately get to see more. Their memory contains 1,000's of future events, and the guide book they come with keeps you (or your kid) involved. Either way you go, there's still much to learn.

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