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Thread: Attention RSN

  1. #1
    Heart of the Yankees Batting Order

    Derek Jeter
    Jason Giambi
    Alex Rodriguez
    Gary Sheffield
    Bernie Williams
    Hedeki Matsui
    Jorge Posada

    Welcome to your worst nightmare

  2. #2
    Does this mean we can put that parade in Boston on hold ... the one they have been planning for their beloved Bosox?

    NEVER UNDERESTIMATE THE BIG STEIN!! :lol:

  3. #3
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    YANKEES LEFT-HANDED STARTING PITCHING

    1....
    2....
    Umm, wait, oops.

  4. #4
    The following column goes into much greater detail, but it says what I have been saying since the story broke ... Arod to the Yankees!!

    THE BIG STEIN = Mr. ABC

    RSN = STC {Small Time Charlie's}


    STC, formerly known as RSN, Read it and weap .....

    ====================================

    COMMENTARY
    By Mike Celizic
    NBCSports.com contributor
    Updated: 5:31 p.m. ET Feb. 14, 2004

    There is no Curse of the Bambino, Boston Fans. That should be more obvious than ever in the wake of the news flashing across the back pages of the tabloids: The Yankees are thinking about trading for Alex Rodriguez.

    Saturday, it was reportedly a done deal.

    This is why the Yankees keep winning and winning and winning some more. They don't rely on a curse to win, they make the moves they need to win.

    A few weeks ago, they developed a hole in their lineup with their third baseman, Aaron Boone, busted up his leg. They couldn’t find a decent third baseman on the market, so they did what only the most successful franchise in the history of sports would even think about.

    They called Texas and asked whether the Rangers’ shortstop, a fellow who answers to A-Rod, might want to move over to third base next to Derek Jeter. When Newsday reported that the deal was consummated on Saturday, it came after the Yankees offered some trinkets in return — Alfonso Soriano, a talented second baseman with the discipline of 20 six-year-olds at a birthday party, and a couple of minor league prospects. And, of course, they’d take over most of A-Rod’s Brobdingnagian salary, though Newsday did report A-Rod would defer some of his contract.

    What makes this news so deliciously depressing to Boston fans is that, if Red Sox executives had the same determination to win as their Yankee counterparts, we wouldn’t be talking about this deal. A-Rod wouldn’t be available, because he’d be a member of the Sox, ready to lead Boston to the World Series.

    The deal was done, and all that Boston had to do was swallow hard, open its wallet, and pay Rodriguez his salary. But at that crucial moment, Boston management came down with a case of testicular atrophy.

    With dominance of the American League and the world championship the team has been chasing since 1918 on the line, Boston owner John Henry decided A-Rod would cost too much.

    It didn’t seem to matter at the time. The Yankees weren’t in the equation and the worst outcome seemed to be that Boston would still have a pretty terrific team and A-Rod would remain in Texas.

    But it matters now. A-Rod in Texas doesn’t hurt Boston. A-Rod in the Bronx could be yet another in an endless series of crushing blows. And Babe Ruth has nothing to do with it. It’s Boston’s lack of will that would be to blame if this goes through.

    Boston says it wants to win. George Steinbrenner not only says it, he does whatever he thinks is necessary to get the job done. That starts with throwing his money around as if he’s printing it in a back room.

    Steinbrenner makes more money than any other team, gives more back to the league in luxury taxes and revenue sharing, and, if his budget has a bottom line, it’s located somewhere beyond the moon.

    This deal is classic Steinbrenner, classic Yankees. It would snatch baseball’s prized bauble from under Boston’s nose. With one stroke of the pen, it would move the Yankees from second place behind Boston in the pre-season polls to first.

    That doesn’t mean A-Rod would deliver another title to New York, which hasn’t hoisted a flag since 2000, a mere blink of the eye to most teams and three eternities to the Yankees. He will make them an incredible offensive machine, and, if he plays third base, he’ll shore up the left side of the infield.

    The pinstripes have spent the winter building the best bullpen they’ve had in years, and they’ve acquired some more pitching. But they’ve lost Andy Pettitte and David Wells and Roger Clemens. Their starting rotation is a question mark, the biggest of them being Kevin Brown, acquired from the Dodgers.

    It shouldn’t matter during the regular season. With the bullpen they have, the Yankees need only six innings from their starters. If the starters give up 4-5 runs a game, the offense will score 5-6. The victories will pile up and Boston and everyone else in the league will spend the six months of the season composing new curses for Steinbrenner’s heroes.

    The playoffs could be a problem, though. The Yankees got out-pitched last year, and great pitching will shut down great hitting in a series. It could happen again.

    But the Yankees will be glad to cross that bridge when they come to it. If, by mid-season, they see that they need pitching, they’ll buy that, too. It’s what they do and what they’ve always done.

    It’s why they are the Yankees, the most famous franchise in American sports, the team that is at once the most loved and most hated in the business. When bold moves are called for, they don’t back down. And if it blows up in their faces, they make another move, bolder than the last.

    Landing A-Rod is the boldest move of all, the sort of move that the Red Sox had no stomach for. That’s why Boston is what it is. It’s why the Yankees just keep winning.

    ===========================

    BIG STEIN ... Mr. ABC ... Mr. ALWAYS BE CLOSING ... the original coffee drinker

  5. #5
    Well the good thing for Sox fans is that it looks like their state is safe for another year.

    They won't have to worry about the riots that would have ensued if the Sox had ever won the World Series.

  6. #6
    cuse'

    But the Yankees will be glad to cross that bridge when they come to it. If, by mid-season, they see that they need pitching, they’ll buy that, too. It’s what they do and what they’ve always done.

  7. #7
    Yup every trade they make constitues buying players.

    Great

  8. #8
    Originally posted by pope@Feb 14 2004, 08:36 PM
    cuse'

    But the Yankees will be glad to cross that bridge when they come to it. If, by mid-season, they see that they need pitching, they’ll buy that, too. It’s what they do and what they’ve always done.
    Because Pope that how you get it done...Unlike the Jets when the yankees need someone they go get him...that why they are on top.

    Thats why were in it every year..

    whats worse ,spending money to be in it or not spending the money and watching it?

  9. #9
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    If my owner wasn't a penny-pinching bastard who equates Vlad Guerrero as big a risk as Mo Vaughn or a pitcher with arm problems... then the Mets might actually be good. I'd take Stein any day of the week.

  10. #10
    GJ&H you're dead wrong on this.

    DEAD wrong.

    Boston has pushed itself to the financial limit: acquiring Schilling, paying good money for Foulke....

    Unlike Yankee Stadium, Fenway is already near capacity (I believe 97% of capacity last season).... the Red Sox are an organization straining with all their might to match the Yankees.

    And it's an uphill battle. The Yankee payroll, including lux tax, may be over 200 mil this year.

    That's obscene. I mean that literally: that is genuinely obscene.

    The Sox are doing everything they can, don't condescend just because the Yankees have far more resources.

    Steinbrenner spends a lot of money: that's too his credit, but he'll make more of a profit this season than JWH will owning the Sox, and you can put whatever spin you want on that.

  11. #11
    RS, here's the point I'm trying to make ... the columnist made the same point

    When you have gone nearly a century without a championship, while your chief rivals have collected championships and pennants like most kids collect baseball cards ... sometimes you need to bite the bullet

    As the kid in Risky Business said ... sometimes you just have to say, WTF

    Arod could have been in Boston ... maybe the Red Sox LOSE MONEY in the short term if they make that deal, but if it wins them the WS is it not worth a short-term financial hit?

    How many millions of Red Sox fans have waited a lifetime for that ONE MOMENT?

    I know this cause I'm also a Jets fan ... my drought has not been anywhere's near as long as yours, but it's already been WAY TOO LONG for me

    Now if my team was close ... CLOSE TO WINNING A SB ... maybe just one impact player away ... and there was no salary cap ... I would expect my owner to bite the bullet if a Great Player in his prime was there for the pickins

    And if he didn't pull the trigger, then that player landed on the roster of my life-long tormentors ... I would have a friggin heart attack ... I'd be lookin to lynch the SOB

    Hey look, I understand the Red Sox dilemma, but let's not kid ourselves ... there are plenty of teams who view the Bosox in the same way you view the Yankees ... as compared with a number of other teams, the Red Sox seemingly have unlimited resources and they spend it

    The only difference between the Yankees and the Royals ... you have the upper-hand on KC, but the Yankees have the upper-hand on you!!

    I'm sure you don't hate it when the Red Sox are aquiring Schilling ... I'm sure you don't stop to consider your poorer brethren in KC ... at that moment it's all about reeling in the big fish, and you are happy as a pig in $hit

    But when the Yankees counter each move with an even bigger move, then we hear the sob story about the less fortunate

    Why weren't you singing this tune when Boston was moving and shaking ... why now?

    Cause now it's your ox that's being gored, but I digress

    Back to the point ... the Red Sox could have had Arod, they had first dibs, but for business reasons they decided not to pull the trigger ... FAIR ENOUGH ... they made what they believe was a wise business decision, I can live with that if you can

    But when BIG STEIN was faced with the same decision, and this is gonna cost him a fortune ... even the Yankees cannot absorb all this payroll and luxury taxes without taking a huge hit ... BIG STEIN placed WINNING above all else, even business {or profits}

    The man took money ... BIG MONEY ... out of his own pocket in an attempt to WIN

    Red Sox could have done the same with Arod ... they had the first crack ... they took a pass and the Yankees pounced

    BOTTOM LINE

  12. #12
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    YOU HEARD IT HERE FIRST:


    THE YANKEES WILL NOT WIN THE 2004 WORLD SERIES.

  13. #13
    GJ+H: I've never been convinced that adding A-Rod would have been such a monumental coup for the Sox considering in the process they'd lose both Manny AND Nomar. This coming year, the starting lineup is coming back almost completely intact, minus Todd Walker, while the starting rotation and bullpen have both had major upgrades.


    So the Sox strength from last season (offense) is still whole for the most part, while their weaknesses have been addressed. As a Red Sox fan, I am content. Having A-Rod would have been nice, but not essential.

    Side note: Why is it in baseball, being willing to spend money is good (Steinbrenner) but in football its bad (Snyder)? Some of you new york fans are a bit hypocritical, wouldn't you say?

  14. #14
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    Originally posted by Jared@Feb 15 2004, 04:11 AM
    Side note: Why is it in baseball, being willing to spend money is good (Steinbrenner) but in football its bad (Snyder)? Some of you new york fans are a bit hypocritical, wouldn't you say?
    Hmmm....interesting question.

  15. #15
    Originally posted by Jared@Feb 15 2004, 04:11 AM
    GJ+H: I've never been convinced that adding A-Rod would have been such a monumental coup for the Sox considering in the process they'd lose both Manny AND Nomar. This coming year, the starting lineup is coming back almost completely intact, minus Todd Walker, while the starting rotation and bullpen have both had major upgrades.


    So the Sox strength from last season (offense) is still whole for the most part, while their weaknesses have been addressed. As a Red Sox fan, I am content. Having A-Rod would have been nice, but not essential.

    Side note: Why is it in baseball, being willing to spend money is good (Steinbrenner) but in football its bad (Snyder)? Some of you new york fans are a bit hypocritical, wouldn't you say?
    If your trying to tell me that acquiring the BEST player in baseball has a down side, you will be exploring a whole new level of homerism....If it's not essential to aquire the best player in the league if you can...your already set up to fail.

    The Mess and the Redsox had a chance to Get A-Rod...why on earth they didn't bend over backwards to get it done i don't know....but i tell you what ....We did get it done and now you will see what could a been.





    Why is it that Redsoxs fans are fine with Kraft spending money...but they hate the yankees for doing it?

  16. #16
    Originally posted by The Gun Of Bavaria+Feb 15 2004, 04:16 AM--></span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (The Gun Of Bavaria @ Feb 15 2004, 04:16 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin--Jared@Feb 15 2004, 04:11 AM
    Side note: Why is it in baseball, being willing to spend money is good (Steinbrenner) but in football its bad (Snyder)? Some of you new york fans are a bit hypocritical, wouldn&#39;t you say?
    Hmmm....interesting question. [/b][/quote]
    I also made this point in regards to a different post. I don&#39;t like the Yankees but they should be a lesson to Woody. If you want the very best you have to pay.

  17. #17
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    Originally posted by Jared@Feb 15 2004, 04:11 AM
    As a Red Sox fan, I am content. Having A-Rod would have been nice, but not essential.

    Bwahaahhahahaahahhaahaha


    Jarad........do you really believe your own bullsh*t? :lol:

  18. #18
    GJH - Look at the big picture.

    First, the Sox took a Patriot type approach to resigning Trot Nixon. A deal that was beneficial to both sides.

    Second and more importantly, the Sox still have Nomar, Varitek, Lowe and Pedro FAs after next year. If the Sox had acquired A-Rod and in the process jettisoned Nomar and Manny, they would have Ordonez for Nomar included in that list of FAs and have the need to resign them all. By all accounts trading for A-Rod would have pushed the Sox over their threshold of 125 million into losing money. Now to your contention, they should make the move to win a title. As you know nothing is guranteed except big contracts. The Sox were not guranteed a title with A-Rod. So 2005 FA season begins the Sox are losing money and have 4 prime FAs to sign. Three, Ordonez, Varitek and Lowe are looking to get paid and the fourth has not exactly said he will take a hometown discount. Do you push the salry to 150 and start losing 25 million a year? No, because it is not like the Sox will then become the highest spending team.

    Last, as a Sox fan I am truly thankful they can spend a modest amount of money compared to 75% of the league. I live in KC and I can tell you, the Sox are not portrayed as the evil empire, it is the Yanks. The Sox are viewed as a big market team, but they are viewed as being attainable. The Yanks are not. At the time of the strike, it was big market teams like NY and Boston. Now it is the Yanks. They earn more then 60+ million then the other big market teams. That allows them to give the Rangers a 120 million dollar rebate as oppossed to the Sox 100 million.

    The bottomline is it was a great move by the Yanks, but let&#39;s not cannonize George as some GM savant. He has the most generated revenue and can spend the most. However, I believe he has reached his limits and if this conglomerate known as the Yanks collapses, it will be interesting to see George&#39;s reaction.

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    Hey......this is such a great move....that even Eddie is makeing a comeback&#33;&#33;


    Dennis Duggan
    Un-Retirement of Capt. Eddie?
    NEWSDAY

    The Yankees&#39; organist and legendary cheerleader said a few weeks ago that he was through, finished, retired at the end of this past season.

    But wait a minute&#33; Capt. Eddie, as 76-year-old Eddie Layton is known around his neighborhood in Forest Hills where he lives on the 25th floor of a co-op, isn&#39;t so sure that&#39;s what he wants to do, after all.

    "George has been calling me, asking me to reconsider," he said a few days ago, referring to George Steinbrenner, the prickly head of the Yankees.

    "Well, now, I&#39;m thinking about un-retiring," he says. "After all, if Michael Jordan can retire and come back and play basketball, why can&#39;t I reconsider and come back and play the organ?"

    He has plenty of time to make up his mind, and he says the Yankees haven&#39;t talked to anyone about replacing him. "I don&#39;t think they&#39;ll want to do anything until next spring," he says, adding, "you know, my job is the best job I have ever had."

    I can&#39;t blame Layton, who has five World Series rings, and who considers Yankee Stadium to be his second home, for rethinking his retirement. What&#39;s more, he really likes The Boss, as Steinbrenner is called, even though he doesn&#39;t think much of his musicianship.

    "One time, he came into the booth here and played the organ. He asked me what I thought. I said, &#39;You&#39;re fired.&#39;"

    A few years ago, Layton, one of the nicest guys you&#39;ll ever meet, invited me to his tiny, glass-enclosed perch, where he kibitzed with longtime baseball public address announcer Bob Sheppard, a close friend.

    I spent the day with him, starting with breakfast inside the stadium, where he told me his first gig in New York was in the Park Sheraton Hotel in mid-Manhattan. On his opening night in 1957, mobster Albert Anastasia was shot and killed in the hotel&#39;s barbershop.

    "I didn&#39;t hear a thing," he says with a smile. "I must have been playing at the time."

    Ten years later, at the urging of then Yankees&#39; president Michael Burke of CBS, Layton agreed to become the first organist to play at the venerable stadium. He"s been playing there ever since, even in a snowstorm one opening day where he played "Let it Snow" on the organ.

    Layton is a bachelor. He says he has been too busy between playing for the Yankees and for soap operas as well as being a representative for the Hammond Organ Co. and recording 26 albums to think of marriage.

    "I just never found the time," he told me. "Every time I got ready to propose, the phone would ring, and someone would say they had a job for me in London or wherever."

    Layton says he not only doesn&#39;t have a wife, he doesn&#39;t own a car and doesn&#39;t like driving. That&#39;s because he never learned to drive and why, when he was offered the Yankees job, he turned it down because he doesn&#39;t like to take the subway, especially at night.

    That&#39;s when the Yankees closed the deal by saying they would provide a limo for him.

    Layton had to learn baseball on the job. "When I started, I had no idea what people meant when they said &#39;sacrifice fly,&#39;ť" he said. "I thought it had something to do with killing insects."

    He has lived in his Queens co-op, which has a sweeping view of Manhattan, for three decades. It&#39;s where he indulges in his hobby: model trains. He says a 6-by-18-foot display that drops from the ceiling of his apartment is "one of the most elaborate models in existence."

    Layton also owns a custom-made, 26-foot-long miniature tugboat with an "E" painted on its smokestack. The boat is docked on the Hudson River in Westchester. "It was built at a shipyard in Connecticut, and it took five men over a year and a half to complete.

    "When the Yankees leave town to play in other parks, I head out to the boat and sleep on board, and that&#39;s my other home, besides the stadium," he says.

    His boat is in dry dock for the winter. "It&#39;s sound asleep," Layton says, "until next spring."

    He has some favorites among the ballplayers he&#39;s met over the years. He ranks Phil Rizzuto, the former shortstop and announcer for the Yankees, at the top, but he also got along well with Mickey Mantle, Dave Winfield and Don Mattingly, who has just signed on as the batting coach for the team for next year.

    Layton has become famous around town, although he admits he "doesn&#39;t like to hang around the night life," and he has appeared on several television talk shows, including the Rosie O&#39;Donnell and David Letterman shows. He is also marketed by a baseball merchandiser who currently offers a Layton autographed baseball for &#036;299.

    Me, I hope Layton comes back and plays live on the organ. When he gets the crowd to yell "charge," starting with a familiar musical riff, you know there&#39;s a human being up in that booth. Steinbrenner usually gets his man the old-fashioned way - by offering more money and perks than anyone else.

    So here&#39;s my prediction: Look for the great Eddie Layton to walk into that glass perch on opening day next year and bang out "New York, New York " before launching into the Star-Spangled Banner.

    "You know, a lot of people think the last two words of the anthem are &#39;Play ball&#33;&#39;" he says.

  20. #20
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    [quote]Originally posted by FloridaJet@Feb 15 2004, 08:43 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by The Gun Of Bavaria,Feb 15 2004, 04:16 AM
    [ but they should be a lesson to Woody. If you want the very best you have to pay.
    If WOODY doesn`t have a salary cap to deal with who knows who he goes out and gets for else..

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