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Thread: And now that the election is over and GW has won

  1. #1
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    [b]NY POST

    By Ralph Peters {former marine}[/b]

    TUESDAY'S decisive popular vote wasn't just for George W. Bush. It was for our troops, as well. The American people sent a message to the world: We know we're at war. And our men and women in uniform are going to win.

    We, the people, voted to fight.

    The first military mission facing the president is the destruction of the terrorist presence in Fallujah. That city-state of terror has become the unifying symbol for our enemies, more vital to the Middle East's fanatics than the fate of Osama bin Laden.

    Last spring, the administration made a fateful mistake, stopping short when our Marines were on the brink of victory. This time, our president with a mandate from the American people isn't going to stop until the last assassin lies dead in the last cellar.

    But he needs to get on with the job. We should move against Fallujah immediately with the support of Iraq's interim prime minister. We have an ideal window for action while our enemies, from al Qaeda and the French to al-Jazeera and the BBC, are bewildered by their failure to dictate our election's outcome. Their vicious attempts to change our government failed. Now they're wondering what on earth to do.

    While they're scrambling, we should be shooting.

    And when the president gives the order to finish the job in Fallujah, the Washington civilians need to get out of the way of our Marines and soldiers. Send the lawyers on a Caribbean cruise. Our troops know how to do this job. We need to trust them.

    We must not be afraid to make an example of Fallujah. While we always seek to fight humanely, the most humane thing we can do in that tormented city is just to win, to burn out the plague of fanaticism and prove to Iraq's people that the forces of terror will not be allowed to enslave them.

    We need to demonstrate that the United States military cannot be deterred or defeated. If that means widespread destruction, we must accept the price. Most of Fallujah's residents those who wish to live in peace have already fled. Those who remain have made their choice. We need to pursue the terrorists remorselessly.

    That means killing. While we strive to obey the internationally recognized laws of war (though our enemies do not), our goal should be to target the terrorists and insurgents so forcefully that few survive to raise their hands in surrender. We don't need more complaints about our treatment of prisoners from the global forces of appeasement. We need terrorists dead in the dust. And the world needs to see their corpses.

    Let potential terrorist recruits get a good, hard look at their probable fate. And let them see a U.S. Marine standing proudly and fearlessly in the center of Fallujah.

    Many other difficult tasks lie ahead, from helping the Iraqis conduct their country's first free national elections, through assisting the Afghans as they consolidate their remarkable progress, to hunting down Islamic terrorists wherever they go to ground.

    We can do it. And the American people know it. They just said so.

    Even if Fallujah has to go the way of Carthage, reduced to shards, the price will be worth it. We need to demonstrate our strength of will to the world, to show that there is only one possible result when madmen take on America.

    Our troops in Iraq have been energized by the election results. They understand that each vote cast for Bush was a vote of confidence in them. They never trusted the phonies who slapped on bumper stickers that read "Support our troops, bring them home."

    Those who voted for President Bush are the real supporters of bringing our troops home. [i]After[/i] their work is done. In Fallujah. And wherever terror threatens the cause of freedom.

  2. #2
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Green Jets & Ham[/i]@Nov 4 2004, 02:08 PM
    [b] [b]NY POST

    By Ralph Peters {former marine}[/b]

    TUESDAY'S decisive popular vote wasn't just for George W. Bush. It was for our troops, as well. The American people sent a message to the world: We know we're at war. And our men and women in uniform are going to win.

    We, the people, voted to fight.

    The first military mission facing the president is the destruction of the terrorist presence in Fallujah. That city-state of terror has become the unifying symbol for our enemies, more vital to the Middle East's fanatics than the fate of Osama bin Laden.

    Last spring, the administration made a fateful mistake, stopping short when our Marines were on the brink of victory. This time, our president with a mandate from the American people isn't going to stop until the last assassin lies dead in the last cellar.

    But he needs to get on with the job. We should move against Fallujah immediately with the support of Iraq's interim prime minister. We have an ideal window for action while our enemies, from al Qaeda and the French to al-Jazeera and the BBC, are bewildered by their failure to dictate our election's outcome. Their vicious attempts to change our government failed. Now they're wondering what on earth to do.

    While they're scrambling, we should be shooting.

    And when the president gives the order to finish the job in Fallujah, the Washington civilians need to get out of the way of our Marines and soldiers. Send the lawyers on a Caribbean cruise. Our troops know how to do this job. We need to trust them.

    We must not be afraid to make an example of Fallujah. While we always seek to fight humanely, the most humane thing we can do in that tormented city is just to win, to burn out the plague of fanaticism and prove to Iraq's people that the forces of terror will not be allowed to enslave them.

    We need to demonstrate that the United States military cannot be deterred or defeated. If that means widespread destruction, we must accept the price. Most of Fallujah's residents those who wish to live in peace have already fled. Those who remain have made their choice. We need to pursue the terrorists remorselessly.

    That means killing. While we strive to obey the internationally recognized laws of war (though our enemies do not), our goal should be to target the terrorists and insurgents so forcefully that few survive to raise their hands in surrender. We don't need more complaints about our treatment of prisoners from the global forces of appeasement. We need terrorists dead in the dust. And the world needs to see their corpses.

    Let potential terrorist recruits get a good, hard look at their probable fate. And let them see a U.S. Marine standing proudly and fearlessly in the center of Fallujah.

    Many other difficult tasks lie ahead ahead, from helping the Iraqis conduct their country's first free national elections, through assisting the Afghans as they consolidate their remarkable progress, to hunting down Islamic terrorists wherever they go to ground.

    We can do it. And the American people know it. They just said so.

    Even if Fallujah has to go the way of Carthage, reduced to shards, the price will be worth it. We need to demonstrate our strength of will to the world, to show that there is only one possible result when madmen take on America.

    Our troops in Iraq have been energized by the election results. They understand that each vote cast for Bush was a vote of confidence in them. They never trusted the phonies who slapped on bumper stickers that read "Support our troops, bring them home."

    Those who voted for President Bush are the real supporters of bringing our troops home. [i]After[/i] their work is done. In Fallujah. And wherever terror threatens the cause of freedom. [/b][/quote]
    RIGHT ON DUDE>>>Let's Roll!

  3. #3
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    Hey, 4th and short, your cartoon is so thought provoking.

    I guess since you liberals are so all-knowing and intelligent, I guess we can expect all of it to come true in the next four years.

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Spirit of Weeb[/i]@Nov 4 2004, 02:18 PM
    [b] Hey, 4th and short, your cartoon is so thought provoking.

    I guess since you liberals are so all-knowing and intelligent, I guess we can expect all of it to come true in the next four years. [/b][/quote]
    I thought you got tired of fighting. Oh wait that was until your favorite cheerleader won.

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by 4th&Long+Nov 4 2004, 02:26 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>[b]QUOTE[/b] (4th&Long @ Nov 4 2004, 02:26 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-Spirit of Weeb[/i]@Nov 4 2004, 02:18 PM
    [b] Hey, 4th and short, your cartoon is so thought provoking.

    I guess since you liberals are so all-knowing and intelligent, I guess we can expect all of it to come true in the next four years. [/b][/quote]
    I thought you got tired of fighting. Oh wait that was until your favorite cheerleader won. [/b][/quote]
    I never said I got tired of debating. I just tired of trying to educate the mentally retarded.

    Now that Bush has retained the Presidency, do you hope your cartoon comes true?

  6. #6
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    --------------------




    If this statement offends you, then move to Saudi Arabia&#33;
    F the UN&#33; F the neo cons...F the Christian Right&#33; GO JETS

    _______________________________________________________________

  7. #7
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Green Jets & Ham[/i]@Nov 4 2004, 02:08 PM
    [b] Our troops in Iraq have been energized by the election results.

    They understand that each vote cast for Bush was a vote of confidence in them.

    [b]They never trusted the phonies who slapped on bumper stickers that read "Support our troops, bring them home."[/b]

    Those who voted for President Bush are the real supporters of bringing our troops home. [i]After[/i] their work is done. In Fallujah. And wherever terror threatens the cause of freedom. [/b][/quote]
    BULLSEYE

  8. #8
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    so this moron from the post knows how the troops feel&#33;
    i guess the troops were emailing him from falluga in between roadside bombs just to let him know that they don&#39;t trust bumper stickers..
    do yourself a favor...don&#39;t read the post..read books..the post has weakened your mind.
    49% of the country are phonoes..only republicans care for the troops&#33;&#33;
    what a frikking joke&#33;&#33;
    these neo con morons are the ones who sent these troops to kill and die for no reason in iraq.

  9. #9
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by bman[/i]@Nov 4 2004, 02:39 PM
    [b] --------------------




    If this statement offends you, then move to Saudi Arabia&#33;
    F the UN&#33; F the neo cons...F the Christian Right&#33; GO JETS

    _______________________________________________________________ [/b][/quote]
    You&#39;re just so clever. Guess that&#39;s why your side is celebrating overwhelming victory this week.

    Keep simmering your hatred. It will serve you just as well in 2008.

  10. #10
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by bman[/i]@Nov 4 2004, 03:48 PM
    [b] do yourself a favor...don&#39;t read the post..read books.. [/b][/quote]
    Terrific.
    Now I&#39;d like to give YOU some advice. Read either of the following books:
    The Middle East (A Brief History of the Last 2,000 Years) by Bernard Lewis
    What Went Wrong? (The Clash Between Islam and Modernity in the Middle East) by Bernard Lewis
    Bernard Lewis is a professor at Princeton who is recognized around the world as one of the leading authorities on Islam and the Middle East. He may change the way you think in a lot of ways.

  11. #11
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    i will..thanks for the suggestion.

    I suggest Blinded by the right...

  12. #12
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by bman[/i]@Nov 4 2004, 02:48 PM
    [b] do yourself a favor...don&#39;t read the post..read books.. [/b][/quote]
    do us all a favor....learn how to spell...what the hell is a phonoes??? Even MSWord spell check couldn&#39;t figure this one out&#33;

  13. #13
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    This guy is a nutjob. KILL,KILL,KILL&#33;

    Calling the BBC an enemy just like al-Qaeda? I&#39;m speechless.

  14. #14
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by bman[/i]@Nov 4 2004, 04:03 PM
    [b] i will..thanks for the suggestion.

    I suggest Blinded by the right... [/b][/quote]
    Thanks for the suggestion as well. I&#39;m not quite sure HOW to feel about David Brock. He IS an admitted liar.
    Ironically, "What Went Wrong?" went to presses BEFORE 9/11. I found that interesting in and of itself and almost prophesizing.

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Gainzo[/i]@Nov 4 2004, 03:07 PM
    [b] This guy is a nutjob. KILL,KILL,KILL&#33; [/b][/quote]
    My Kinda Guy :lol:

  16. #16
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Green Jets & Ham+Nov 4 2004, 06:17 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>[b]QUOTE[/b] (Green Jets & Ham @ Nov 4 2004, 06:17 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-Gainzo[/i]@Nov 4 2004, 03:07 PM
    [b] This guy is a nutjob. KILL,KILL,KILL&#33; [/b][/quote]
    My Kinda Guy :lol: [/b][/quote]
    Time to take out the trash....

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    U.S. Warplanes Pound Targets in Fallujah

    By JIM KRANE, Associated Press Writer

    NEAR FALLUJAH, Iraq - U.S. warplanes pounded Fallujah late Friday in what residents called the strongest attacks in months, as more than 10,000 American soldiers and Marines massed for an expected assault. Iraq (news - web sites)&#39;s prime minister warned the "window is closing" to avert an offensive.

    Residents reached by telephone said the aircraft were striking targets in the central city market that had not been hit since April as well as neighborhoods in the north, south and east of Fallujah. There was no confirmation from U.S. officials. Earlier Friday, residents said U.S. planes dropped leaflets urging women and children to leave the city, 40 miles west of the capital, Baghdad.


    Meanwhile, the insurgent group al-Qaida in Iraq called for the release of the kidnapped executive of the CARE charity, Margaret Hassan, and promised to free her if she fell into their hands.


    In a message posted on the Internet, the group led by Abu Musab al-Zarqawi said it wanted the world to know "if (the kidnappers of Margaret Hassan) handed us this captive, we will release her immediately unless it is proven she was conspiring against Muslims."


    The authenticity of the statement could not be verified, but it was signed "al-Qaida in Iraq" and it appeared Friday on a Web site known for publishing messages from Islamic militant groups.


    As pressure mounted on the guerrilla stronghold, the insurgents struck back, killing one U.S. soldier and wounding five in a rocket attack. Clashes were reported at other checkpoints around the city and in the east and north of Fallujah late in the day.


    In Baghdad, a huge column of black smoke rose over the city&#39;s Karrada district after midnight, and residents said they heard heavy gunfire, presumably between police and militants. No one answered the phone at the local police station.


    For the past three nights, long convoys of American soldiers from Baghdad and Baqouba have rolled onto a dust-blown base on the outskirts of Fallujah, a city that has become the symbol of Iraqi resistance. U.S. commanders here have been coordinating plans either to fight their way into the city or isolate it from the rest of Iraq&#39;s Sunni Muslim heartland.


    If they fight, American troops will face an estimated 3,000 insurgents dug in behind defenses and booby traps. Military planners believe there are about 1,200 hardcore insurgents in Fallujah at least half of them Iraqis. They are bolstered by insurgent cells with up to 2,000 fighters in the surrounding towns and countryside.


    In Brussels, Belgium, Iraq&#39;s interim prime minister, Ayad Allawi, warned that the "window is closing" to avert an assault on Fallujah. Allawi must give the final go-ahead for the offensive, part of a campaign to curb the insurgency ahead of national elections planned for January.


    Sunni clerics have threatened to boycott the election if Fallujah is attacked, and U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan (news - web sites) has warned U.S., British and Iraqi authorities that a military campaign and "increased insurgent violence" could put elections at risk.


    U.S. aircraft struck targets around Fallujah in numerous raids starting late Thursday and continuing into Friday night. Targets included a system of barriers rigged with bombs, a command post, suspected fighting positions and a weapons cache, according to Lt. Nathan Braden of the 1st Marine Division.


    Late Friday, U.S. jets went into action again, striking several targets in the Jolan sector of northern Fallujah, residents said. Jolan is considered one of the most heavily defended neighborhoods in the city.


    As the night dragged on, the attack was expanded to targets in many areas of city, according to residents. Artillery fire could also be heard. The drone of U.S. aircraft heading toward Fallujah could be heard over Baghdad.


    Earlier, mortar shells exploded on a small U.S. base at Saqlawiyah west of Fallujah, the military said. U.S. troops returned fire, killing a number of insurgents, the military said.


    Iraqi authorities closed a border crossing point with Syria, and U.S. troops set up checkpoints along major routes into the city. Marines fired on a civilian vehicle that did not stop at a checkpoint in Fallujah, killing an Iraqi woman and wounding her husband, according to the U.S. military and witnesses. The car didn&#39;t notice the checkpoint, witnesses said.


    "Marines fire upon vehicles only as a last resort when verbal and visual warnings to stop fail. Such was the case today," the Marines said in a statement.





    The violence came a day after two Marines were killed and four were wounded in fighting west of Baghdad. The Marine command gave no further details, citing security.

    A U.S. soldier was killed and another wounded when a roadside bomb hit their vehicle north of Baghdad on Thursday.

    Elsewhere, U.S. Cobra attack helicopters fired Friday on insurgents operating an illegal checkpoint south of Baghdad, killing or wounding an "unknown number" of people, the military said.

    Allawi has demanded that Fallujah hand over foreign extremists, including Jordanian terror mastermind Abu Musab al-Zarqawi and his followers, and allow government troops to enter the city.

    "We intend to liberate the people and to bring the rule of law to Fallujah," Allawi said in Brussels after meeting with European Union (news - web sites) leaders. "The window really is closing for a peaceful settlement."

    Zarqawi&#39;s followers claimed responsibility for the suicide attack that killed three British soldiers south of Baghdad on Thursday, according to a statement posted on an Islamist Web site. The claim could not be verified but appeared on a Web site often used by militants to post claims.

    Allawi, a secular Shiite Muslim with strong ties to the CIA (news - web sites) and State Department, urged the Europeans to forge a "close and strategic partnership" with Iraq and called on NATO (news - web sites) to step up plans to train 1,000 officers a year for the Iraqi military.

    EU leaders responded with a nearly &#036;40 million offer to fund elections, including training for Iraqi vote monitors.

    French President Jacques Chirac who opposed the Iraq war skipped a meeting with Allawi to fly to Abu Dhabi to pay his respects to the new president of the United Arab Emirates, who took over after the death of his father. Many saw it as a snub of Allawi, although Chirac denied that, describing his relations with the new Iraqi authorities as "excellent."

    Allawi faces strong opposition to a Fallujah offensive from the Sunni minority. The Sunni clerical Association of Muslim Scholars has threatened to boycott the January election and mount a nationwide civil disobedience campaign.

    A public outcry over civilian casualties prompted the Bush administration to call off the siege of Fallujah in April, after which the city fell under control of radical clerics and their followers.

    Those warnings were echoed by Annan in a letter dated Oct. 31 to American, British and Iraqi leaders. A copy was obtained by The Associated Press.

    "I have in mind not only the risk of increased insurgent violence, but also reports of major military offensives being planned by the multinational force in key localities such as Fallujah," Annan wrote.

    Nevertheless, U.S. and Iraqi authorities appear committed to a showdown with the city of an estimated 300,000 residents.

    In hopes of assuaging public outrage, Iraqi authorities have put together a team of administrators to run Fallujah after the offensive and have earmarked &#036;75 million to repair the damage, Marine Maj. Jim West said. The strategy is similar to one used when U.S. troops restored government authority in the Shiite holy city Najaf last August after weeks of fighting with militiamen.

  18. #18
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    Just drop a MOAB on the city and then there will be plenty of Work
    for Civilians in rebuilding&#33;&#33; ;)

  19. #19
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    when do the warplanes hit iran?

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    not soon enough.

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