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Thread: Squeezing Jello in Iraq

  1. #1
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    Squeezing jello in Iraq

    By Scott Ritter

    11/09/04 "Aljazeera" -- The much-anticipated US-led offensive to seize the Iraqi city of Falluja from anti-American Iraqi fighters has begun. Meeting resistance that, while stiff at times, was much less than had been anticipated, US Marines and soldiers, accompanied by Iraqi forces loyal to the interim government of Iyad Allawi, have moved into the heart of Falluja.

    Fighting is expected to continue for a few more days, but US commanders are confident that Falluja will soon be under US control, paving the way for the establishment of order necessary for nation-wide elections currently scheduled for January 2005.

    But will it? American military planners expected to face thousands of Iraqi resistance fighters in the streets of Falluja, not the hundreds they are currently fighting. They expected to roll up the network of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi and his foreign Islamic militants, and yet to date have found no top-tier leaders from that organization. As American forces surge into Falluja, Iraqi fighters are mounting extensive attacks throughout the rest of Iraq.

    Far from facing off in a decisive battle against the resistance fighters, it seems the more Americans squeeze Falluja, the more the violence explodes elsewhere. It is exercises in futility, akin to squeezing jello. The more you try to get a grasp on the problem, the more it slips through your fingers.

    This kind of war, while frustrating for the American soldiers and marines who wage it, is exactly the struggle envisioned by the Iraqi resistance. They know they cannot stand toe-to-toe with the world's most powerful military and expect to win.

    While the US military leadership struggles to get a grip on a situation in Iraq that deteriorates each and every day, the anti-US occupation fighters continue to execute a game plan that has been in position since day one.

    President Bush prematurely declared "mission accomplished" back in May 2003. For Americans, this meant that major combat operations in Iraq had come to an end, that we had won the war. But for the Iraqis, it meant something else. In Iraq, there never was a ‘Missouri moment', where the government formally surrendered. The fact is, Saddam Hussein's government never surrendered, and still is very much in evidence in Iraq today in the form of the anti-US resistance.

    While we in America were declaring victory, the government of Saddam was planning its war. The first battles were fought in March and April 2003. Token resistance, no decisive engagement. The Iraqis fought just enough to establish the principle of resistance, but not enough to squander their resources.

    Since May 2003, the resistance has grown in size and sophistication. Some attribute this to the incompetence of the post-war occupation policies of the United States. While this certainly was a factor in facilitating the resistance, the fact remains that what is occurring today in Iraq is part of a well-conceived plan the goal of which is to restore the Baath Party back to power. And the policies of the Bush administration are playing right into their hands.

    The terror attacks carried out against the United Nations and other international aid organizations succeeded in driving out of Iraq the vestiges of foreign involvement the Bush administration relied upon to present an international face to the US-led occupation. In the chaos and anarchy that followed, the United States was compelled to use more and more force in an attempt to restore order, creating a Catch-22 situation where the more force we used, the more resistance we generated, requiring more force in response.

    The cycle of violence fed the resistance, destabilizing huge areas of Iraq that are still outside the control of the Iraqi government and US military. High profile operations in Najaf, Sadr City and Sammara did little to bring these cities to bear.

    Today, fighters in Iraq operate freely, continuing their orgy of death and destruction in order to attract the inevitable heavy-handed US response. Falluja is a prime case in point. While the US is unlikely to deliver a fatal blow to the Iraqi resistance, it is succeeding in levelling huge areas of Falluja, recalling the Vietnam-era lament that we had to destroy the village in order to save it.

    The images from Falluja will only fuel the anti-American sentiment in Iraq, enabling the anti-US fighters to recruit ten new fighters for every newly-minted 'martyr' it loses in the current battle against the Americans.

    The battle for Falluja is supposed to be the proving ground of the new Iraq Army. Instead, it may well prove to be a fatal pill. The reality is there is no Iraqi Army. Of the tens of thousands recruited into its ranks, there is today only one effective unit, the 36th Battalion.

    This unit has fought side by side with the Americans in Falluja, Najaf, and Samara. By all accounts, it has performed well. But this unit can only prevail when it operates alongside overwhelming American military support. Left to fend for itself, it would be slaughtered by the resistance fighters. Worse, this unit which stands as a symbol of the ideal for the new Iraqi Army is actually the antithesis of what the new Iraqi Army should be.

    While the Bush administration has suppressed the formation of militia units organized along ethnic and religious lines, the 36th Battalion should be recognized for what it really is – a Kurdish militia, retained by the US military because the rest of the Iraqi Army is unwilling or unable to carry the fight to the Iraqi resistance fighters.

    The battle for Falluja has exposed not only the fallacy of the US military strategy towards confronting the resistance in Iraq, but also the emptiness of the interim government of Iyad Allawi, which is so far incapable of building anything that resembles a viable Iraqi military capable of securing its position in Iraq void of American military support.

    Falluja is probably the beginning of a very long and bloody phase of the Iraq war, one that pits an American military under orders from a rejuvenated Bush administration to achieve victory at any cost against an Iraqi resistance that is willing to allow Iraq to sink into a quagmire of death and destruction in order to bog down and eventually expel the American occupier.

    It is a war the United States cannot win, and which the government of Iyad Allawi cannot survive. Unfortunately, since recent polls show that some 70% of the American people support the war in Iraq, it is a war that will rage until the American domestic political dynamic changes, and the tide of public opinion turns against the war.

    Tragically, this means many more years of conflict in Iraq that will result in thousands more killed on both sides, and incomprehensible suffering for the people of Iraq, and unpredictable instability for the entire Middle East.

  2. #2
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    When will Ritter write his follow-up to this- [b]"Fondling Underage Girls"??[/b]

    Hey hole; enjoy the next four years!

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Come Back to NY[/i]@Nov 9 2004, 09:14 PM
    [b] When will Ritter write his follow-up to this- [b]"Fondling Underage Girls"??[/b]

    Hey hole; enjoy the next four years! [/b][/quote]
    Typical rightist wacko. When the message is unimpeachable attack the messenger.

    As to the next 4 years I will be loving every minute of it. With all of those soldiers coming home to find out their wives have divorced them and their employers have hired replacements it should be quite a wing-ding. And lets not forget the guys who are trained in special demolition techniques that have seen countless pieces of meat on the side of the road that used to be Iraqi children. Yep the next 4 years should be quite something CBNY

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    Collaboration from the Independent of London:

    [b]US 'pacifies' city but rebels take violence to rest of country[/b]
    By Kim Sengupta in Camp Dogwood

    10 November 2004

    US forces reached the centre of Fallujah yesterday after hours of street fighting and barrages from artillery, tank and helicopter gunships. As night fell, the Americans announced that they had captured key strategic targets and were carrying out house-to-house searches.

    The Pentagon said that at least 10 US and two Iraqi soldiers had died since the offensive began on Monday night. Reports of insurgents' deaths vary between 12 and 42. Iyad Allawi, the Iraqi interim Prime Minister, claimed that troops had detained 38 insurgents entrenched at the hospital.

    Even as US commanders were declaring that the rebel stronghold would be "pacified" very soon, the price being paid for the victory was becoming evident in the carnage being visited around the country. It appears that many of the insurgents who had been based in Fallujah slipped out of the city and moved to other parts of Iraq before the offensive.

    The estimates given by the US military about the numbers of insurgents in Fallujah have varied. Two weeks ago it was claimed there were 6,000 heavily armed militants, including the Jordanian terrorist, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, in the city. However, small groups of fighters, sometimes no more than 20 strong, have attempted to engage the Americans, who vastly outnumber and outgun them, before fading away.

    The explanation of what had happened to those missing fighters could be found, perhaps, in what happened elsewhere in Iraq yesterday.

    Hundreds of armed men entered Ramadi, taking over government buildings, while in Baquba, north of Baghdad, 45 people, including 25 policemen were killed in a series of attacks. Eleven people died in bombings in Baghdad, and an attack on a National Guard headquarters in Kirkuk killed three people.

    There was also political unravelling, with one of the main Sunni groups, the Iraqi Islamic Party, resigning from the Iraqi government in protest at the assault. "The American attack on our people in Fallujah has led and will lead to more killings and genocide without mercy from the Americans," said its leader, Mohsen Abdel Hamid. The Association of Muslim Scholars, an influential group of Sunni clerics, called for a boycott of next January's planned elections which were, it said, being held "over the corpses of those killed in Fallujah and the blood of the wounded".

    There were reports from Fallujah that almost 500 Iraqi government troops * almost a battalion * had refused to fight alongside the Americans, a repetition of similar incidents when US forces attacked the city last April. In Washington, Donald Rumsfeld, the US Defence Secretary, said: "I would characterise it as an isolated problem."

    The government imposed an indefinite night-time curfew in Baghdad. Officials said there was "credible evidence" that militants escaping from Fallujah had regrouped in the capital and were planning more attacks.

    Colonel Michael Formica, the commander of the 1st Cavalry Brigade, said in Fallujah that escaping fighters were a real problem. "My concern now is only one * not to allow any enemy to escape. As we tighten the noose around him, he will move to escape to fight another day. I do not want these guys to get out of here. I want them killed or captured as they flee".

    Intermittent fighting was under way in the northern sectors of Fallujah, with at least two American tanks reported to be engulfed in flames. Despite meeting fierce and, at times, sustained resistance, senior officers of the army's Task Force, of the 1st Infantry Division, said they had not encountered any of the more than 120 "suicide cars" supposedly waiting for them packed with explosives. However, other units reported that they had found booby-trapped buildings.

    By midday, US armoured units, attacking from the north, had made their way to the highway running from east to west through the city centre and crossed over into the southern part of the city. One of the objectives surrounded by US forces was the al-Hidra mosque half a mile inside the city. According to the American commanders, the mosque was being used as an a weapons dump and planning centre for militants, and will be captured in due course with Iraqi government troops leading the way.

    US troops are using Fallujah's main railway station as a forward base and detention centre. Iraqi government troops brought in nine handcuffed prisoners from the Jolan area, where many of the militants are said to have gathered. They said two were Egyptians and one was Syrian.

    Captain Robert Bodisch, a Marines tank company commander, said: "They are putting up a strong fight ... these people are hardcore ... A man pulled out from behind a wall and fired an RPG [rocket-propelled grenade] at my tank. I have to get another tank to go back in there."

    Local people claimed US warplanes bombed a clinic, causing many casualties. The main hospital was captured by US and Iraqi government forces on Monday, when, according to government figures, more than 40 "terrorists" were killed.

  5. #5
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    This typefies the problem with todays Army and the world's 'need to know'.

    Everybody knew when the Army was going to go into Fallujah. Of course insurgents took the chance to get out while the getting was good.

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    I'd sooner listen to a Catholic Priest's Seminar on friendship with young boys then Scott Ritter's opinion on Iraq. The man has no standing in that arena, let me rephrase that, no credibility.

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    WCM - does it bother you that no one takes you, your message or your opinions seriously? I mean, it has to be frustrating to be so insignificant, I'd imagine.


    Nobody takes anarchists are anarcho-syndicalists seriously. You obviously know that. Now, I can appreciate your whole angle, I really can. If I wasn't smart, talented or good-looking, I'd find some sort of angle too. So, I can see why you'd gravitate towards something like anarchy...why not, it can't hurt, right? I bet 19-year old community college girls are probably impressed with such "shocking" ideas...for a little while anyway. I bet you cleaned up at goth parties whe you were younger, huh?


    But, it gets to a point, when you get a little older, where it just becomes sad and pathetic...you're like a bee buzzing around an elephant. It doesn't frustrate you that your stings haven't killed the elephant, it frustrates you that the elephant doesn't even [i]notice[/i] you. That's really all that this whole anarchy and "subvert the dominant paradigm" nonsense is about - being noticed. In a way, I almost feel badly for you. Almost.

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    I thought we went to Iraq to remove wmd's and Saddam!

    when does it end??

    and the 18 year old in Falluga who turned militant AFTER we arrived was never my enemy!
    I know you guys are all for destroying someone elses home and all..but iraquis (who were never involved in islamic terrorism against the west) defending their homeland against an occupying superpower, are doing nothing different than I would do and I assume you would do...
    it's sad..

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    bman, an Iraqi attacked the WTC in 1993.

    Bman - if an "occupying power" invaded, would you kill American children waiting on line for candy as a method of fighting back? Would you use women and children as human shields in a battle zone?

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    i am talking about the ligitimate insurgency against the US in iraq..There is one there..
    a pakistani attacked wtc'93..

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by bman[/i]@Nov 10 2004, 10:25 AM
    [b] I thought we went to Iraq to remove wmd's and Saddam!

    when does it end??

    and the 18 year old in Falluga who turned militant AFTER we arrived was never my enemy!
    I know you guys are all for destroying someone elses home and all..but iraquis (who were never involved in islamic terrorism against the west) defending their homeland against an occupying superpower, are doing nothing different than I would do and I assume you would do...
    it's sad.. [/b][/quote]
    Ues as a PART of the GLOBAL war on terror. The first mission WAS accomplished and now we continue to find terrorists (most not even FROM Iraq) that are fighting against freedom. Don't kid yourself that there is ANYONE that was "converted" to terrorism as a result of our actions. Anyone who's extreme enough to interpret the Koran to say everyone who isn't a Mulsim should die and act on it IS already a terrorist by definition. The fact that we're in Iraq and terorrists are coming there to fight the coalition makes it much easier for Iraq and its allies. At least we all don't need to travel the world searching for them as much.

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    the real terrorists left fallujah prior to this battle

    the only insurgents left are kids, not professionals

    the US takes fallujah, but will lose another city (Samarra) - then they will have to go liberate that ****hole... again... but while they are gaining back that city they will lose another city ...

    get used to years of this hide-and-seek bull****

    this isn't about Liberalism or Conservatism it's about the right way to fight urban guerilla warfare and the wrong way - right now we are involved in the wrong way.

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by bitonti[/i]@Nov 10 2004, 12:12 PM
    [b]
    the only insurgents left are kids, not professionals

    this isn't about Liberalism or Conservatism it's about the right way to fight urban guerilla warfare and the wrong way - right now we are involved in the wrong way. [/b][/quote]
    Good. Kill them before they become professional.

    What IS the right way to fight urban guerilla warfare? Enlighten me.

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    I would much rather have our Brave kick ass military men/women fighting these coward muslim scum over there than on our land any day...

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    Bitonti has a legit point - why on earth are we telling the world when, where and how we are going to attack Fallujah? It makes no strategic sense. I can see that they tried negotiations, and that providing advance notice could help to save innocent ife, giving ordinary citizens a chance to evacuate in advance of the army...but he's right - all we are doing is providing the enemy with useful information...and that is never good. It puts our troops in more danger, which I think is a big mistake. I supprt the war and Bush - but I am scracthing my head on this one....

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Enrique Pallazzo+Nov 10 2004, 11:15 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>[b]QUOTE[/b] (Enrique Pallazzo &#064; Nov 10 2004, 11:15 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-bitonti[/i]@Nov 10 2004, 12:12 PM
    [b]
    the only insurgents left are kids, not professionals

    this isn&#39;t about Liberalism or Conservatism it&#39;s about the right way to fight urban guerilla warfare and the wrong way - right now we are involved in the wrong way. [/b][/quote]
    Good. Kill them before they become professional.

    What IS the right way to fight urban guerilla warfare? Enlighten me. [/b][/quote]
    what you and other neo-conservatives don&#39;t seem to understand is that terrorists that are also kids were just kids in the not too recent past. For whatever reason (I&#39;m not condoning terrorism) - they are Angry enough at the west to die to make their point.

    Rather than question why this is as it is, or figure a way to really change the terrorist --&#62; suicidal violence dynamic all we are doing is treating the symptom not the problem.

    to use a metaphor from pest control - when you have an infestation you cut off the routes inside the residence (Border control), you cut off the food sources by cleaning house (Intel) and you use some sort of poison that they will share, eat and kill them (Consumerism, Foreign Investment... "rebuilding" etc.)

    The pace of progress in Iraq is essentially still less than zero. We are fighting sporatic but determined urban guerilla warfare, probably the worst kind of conditions for troops in terms of vulnerability. Colin Powell&#39;s doctrine says you need overwhelming force before ANY conflict. Paul Wolfowitz and Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld have their own doctrines which apparently do not heed the lessons learned by Military strategists who know more about this s**t than anyone, myself included.

    Miltarilistically speaking the US forces fight an uphill battle, precisely because of long supply lines and multiple fronts and not enough troop levels - exactly the lessons Germany learned during WWII - are terrorists at the same level as russia? In terms of technology and operational strength, no. But it was not the Russians technology or operational strength which weakened the Germans it was their willingness to die for the cause, and their home field advantage.

    In 1776-79 America out-foxed a much larger, better armed and better trained foe by using similar tactics. Exploiting long supply lines and testing the will of the decision-makers on the other side of the Atlantic. Irony that they are both King Georges? B)

  17. #17
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by jets5ever[/i]@Nov 10 2004, 12:27 PM
    [b] Bitonti has a legit point - why on earth are we telling the world when, where and how we are going to attack Fallujah? It makes no strategic sense. I can see that they tried negotiations, and that providing advance notice could help to save innocent ife, giving ordinary citizens a chance to evacuate in advance of the army...but he&#39;s right - all we are doing is providing the enemy with useful information...and that is never good. It puts our troops in more danger, which I think is a big mistake. I supprt the war and Bush - but I am scracthing my head on this one.... [/b][/quote]
    We&#39;re telling the world where and when we attack because if we didn&#39;t we&#39;d be accused of all sorts of atrocities and rushing to go to war and not protecting freedom of the press, etc... I agree. We shouldn&#39;t know specifics. We shouldn&#39;t have embedded reporters. We shouldn&#39;t know strategies, troops counts, or armament. Let the military do their jobs without politics.

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by bitonti[/i]@Nov 10 2004, 12:30 PM
    [b] what you and other neo-conservatives don&#39;t seem to understand is that terrorists that are also kids were just kids in the not too recent past. For whatever reason (I&#39;m not condoning terrorism) - they are Angry enough at the west to die to make their point.

    Rather than question why this is as it is, or figure a way to really change the terrorist --&#62; suicidal violence dynamic all we are doing is treating the symptom not the problem.

    to use a metaphor from pest control - when you have an infestation you cut off the routes inside the residence (Border control), you cut off the food sources by cleaning house (Intel) and you use some sort of poison that they will share, eat and kill them (Consumerism, Foreign Investment... "rebuilding" etc.)

    The pace of progress in Iraq is essentially still less than zero. We are fighting sporatic but determined urban guerilla warfare, probably the worst kind of conditions for troops in terms of vulnerability. Colin Powell&#39;s doctrine says you need overwhelming force before ANY conflict. Paul Wolfowitz and Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld have their own doctrines which apparently do not heed the lessons learned by Military strategists who know more about this s**t than anyone, myself included.

    Miltarilistically speaking the US forces fight an uphill battle, precisely because of long supply lines and multiple fronts and not enough troop levels - exactly the lessons Germany learned during WWII - are terrorists at the same level as russia? In terms of technology and operational strength, no. But it was not the Russians technology or operational strength which weakened the Germans it was their willingness to die for the cause, and their home field advantage.

    In 1776-79 America out-foxed a much larger, better armed and better trained foe by using similar tactics. Exploiting long supply lines and testing the will of the decision-makers on the other side of the Atlantic. Irony that they are both King Georges? B) [/b][/quote]
    I wasn&#39;t being a wise ass asking you to enlighten me. Thank you for telling me your viewpoint. I agree to some degree.

    These kids are taught that this is what Allah wants. That this is what Allah expects. That we are the devil and should be exterminated from the Earth. The root, then, of that problem is in WHOEVER is teaching that. It&#39;s similar to the Japanese&#39;s "yamato damashii" or "spirit warriors" who convinced their military that the Japanese were direct decendants of god and that they should be willing to give their lives for their god/emperor. It has been said that true combat power is arms multiplied by fighting spirit. If one of them is infinitelt strong, you will succeed. These people&#39;s opinions of the West will NEVER change until this planet is rid of the infidels. PERIOD&#33; That&#39;s not ALL Muslims, but certainly is true of the extremists. They don&#39;t WANT to share this world with us. It&#39;s not what they believe Allah wants. How does one cut off the extremists while still respecting the rights and lives of the innocent Muslims?
    How do we know what the supply routes are? Do you think the insurgents are jsut marching their butts down the main roads into each town?
    Cut off the food supply? How do you do that without starving the innocent Muslims in these areas? If we did that the world and CERTAINLY all the libs in this country would be calling our men and women in the military the murderers of the innocent.
    WE ARE trying to promote consurerism, foreign investment, and rebuilding.
    I just think it&#39;s a much deeper issue than you suggest.

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    November 9th, 2004 6:16 pm
    Sunni Party Withdraws from Iraqi Government in Protest over Fallujah


    By Sameer N. Yacoub / Associated Press

    BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) A major Sunni political party has quit the interim Iraqi government and revoked its single minister from the Cabinet in protest over the U.S. assault on the insurgent stronghold of Fallujah, the party&#39;s leader said Tuesday.

    The Iraqi Islamic Party wields significant influence over the country&#39;s Sunni community and its withdrawal from the government will likely be a blow to Interim Prime Minister Ayad Allawi.

    &#39;&#39;We are protesting the attack on Fallujah and the injustice that is inflicted on the innocent people of the city,&#39;&#39; said Mohsen Abdel-Hamid, head of the Iraqi Islamic Party.

    Abdel-Hamid told The Associated Press the party leaders convened Monday and decided that their one minister in the Cabinet Minister of Industry, Hajim Al-Hassani should quit.

    &#39;&#39;We cannot be part of this attack,&#39;&#39; he said.

    On Monday, Allawi confirmed he had given the greenlight to multinational and Iraqi forces to retake the insurgent-held city of Fallujah, which has become a symbol of Muslim resistance to the U.S. led-forces in Iraq.

    U.S. and Iraqi forces pushed into the northern sector of Fallujah after an all-out offensive was launched early Monday to seize the key insurgent strongholds in the city west of Baghdad.

    Fallujah has become the major sanctuary for Islamic extremists bent on destabilizing the U.S-backed interim authorities in Iraq.

    The Iraqi Islamic Party is the Iraqi branch of the Muslim Brotherhood, a moderate Sunni Islamic party well established in the Middle East.

    A prolific author on the Koran, Abdel-Hamid was detained under the regime of Saddam Hussein. The party was suppressed under the former dictator and many of its members were forced to flee abroad.

    The Iraqi Islamic Party returned to public life after U.S.-led coalition forces toppled Saddam and established the country&#39;s interim authorities.

  20. #20
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Section109Row15[/i]@Nov 10 2004, 02:07 PM
    [b] November 9th, 2004 6:16 pm
    Sunni Party Withdraws from Iraqi Government in Protest over Fallujah


    By Sameer N. Yacoub / Associated Press

    BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) A major Sunni political party has quit the interim Iraqi government and revoked its single minister from the Cabinet in protest over the U.S. assault on the insurgent stronghold of Fallujah, the party&#39;s leader said Tuesday.

    The Iraqi Islamic Party wields significant influence over the country&#39;s Sunni community and its withdrawal from the government will likely be a blow to Interim Prime Minister Ayad Allawi.

    &#39;&#39;We are protesting the attack on Fallujah and the injustice that is inflicted on the innocent people of the city,&#39;&#39; said Mohsen Abdel-Hamid, head of the Iraqi Islamic Party.

    Abdel-Hamid told The Associated Press the party leaders convened Monday and decided that their one minister in the Cabinet Minister of Industry, Hajim Al-Hassani should quit.

    &#39;&#39;We cannot be part of this attack,&#39;&#39; he said.

    On Monday, Allawi confirmed he had given the greenlight to multinational and Iraqi forces to retake the insurgent-held city of Fallujah, which has become a symbol of Muslim resistance to the U.S. led-forces in Iraq.

    U.S. and Iraqi forces pushed into the northern sector of Fallujah after an all-out offensive was launched early Monday to seize the key insurgent strongholds in the city west of Baghdad.

    Fallujah has become the major sanctuary for Islamic extremists bent on destabilizing the U.S-backed interim authorities in Iraq.

    The Iraqi Islamic Party is the Iraqi branch of the Muslim Brotherhood, a moderate Sunni Islamic party well established in the Middle East.

    A prolific author on the Koran, Abdel-Hamid was detained under the regime of Saddam Hussein. The party was suppressed under the former dictator and many of its members were forced to flee abroad.

    The Iraqi Islamic Party returned to public life after U.S.-led coalition forces toppled Saddam and established the country&#39;s interim authorities. [/b][/quote]
    The interesting thing is that we keep hearing that anyone innocent (and this is a very broad generalization) left Fallujah months ago.

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