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Thread: Sexual Education

  1. #1
    Kangaroo F*cker
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    Not a good sign.

    Source:[url=http://www.boston.com/news/globe/editorial_opinion/oped/articles/2004/11/11/sex_education_texas_style/]Sex Education, Texas Style[/url]

    [quote][b]By Ellen Goodman, Globe Columnist | November 11, 2004

    HERE IT is, just days after the red states gave their presidential seal of approval to the man from Texas, and we've already been treated to another skirmish in the culture wars. The Texas Board of Education has given its educational seal of approval to what may soon be dubbed Red Sex Ed.

    The big news is the state's successful demand that textbook publishers change the description of marriage between "two people" to marriage between "a man and a woman." They also ordered that marriage be defined as "a lifelong union between a husband and a wife."

    Frankly, I found the "lifelong" description charming, considering that the Lone Star State has one of the highest divorce rates in the country. Massachusetts, by the way, has the lowest divorce rate in the country. We are so fond of marriage that we want everyone to do it.

    But never mind all that. The real heart of the textbook controversy is whether Texas students should learn about contraception. And the answer is no.

    Texas has now officially gone to abstinence-only textbooks. The students are learning the ABCs of sex ed without the C. And as Texas, the second-largest book buyer in the country, goes, so may go the nation.

    Only one of the four approved books even mentions contraceptives. The altered lessons teach students how to avoid sexually transmitted diseases in many ways -- including "getting plenty of rest" -- but not by using condoms. One actually suggests using latex gloves to avoid contact with blood but says nothing about using latex . . . you get the idea.

    Ironically, the state curriculum for health education still mandates that students "analyze the effectiveness and ineffectiveness of barrier protection and other contraceptive methods." But the books have expunged the information they're required to learn.

    In some ways, this Texas story is proof of how the abstinence-only lobby is flexing its muscle. But Americans are nowhere nearly as polarized over sex education as it appears in this public wrangling.

    Americans have come to some sort of uneasy understanding that sex education is not just about health but also about values. It's not just about biology but also about relationships.

    As Samantha Smoot, an opponent of textbook censorship who heads the Texas Freedom Network, says: "Everyone agrees that abstinence is the best choice for teenagers. And everyone thinks books should give kids real negotiation skills and information that helps them make responsible decisions." Last summer, some 90 percent of Texans surveyed said they wanted teens to learn about both abstinence and contraception.

    Americans, especially parents, believe that teenagers should delay sex, even if we have trouble answering the next question: Until when? Some believe sex should be postponed until that mystical age called maturity and others until marriage. Everyone seems to hope that their own kids will wait till they're no longer under our roof.

    But it turns out that most parents are pragmatic as well as worried. We have rules and fallback positions. We don't want our kids to drink, but we want them to call us for a ride home if they do. We don't want them to have sex, but we hope they'll use protection if they do. If that's a mixed message, it's a safety message. And it's working.

    Over the past decade, teen pregnancy and births are down by about 30 percent. As a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention scientist showed, just about half the decrease in pregnancy comes from abstinence and half from increased contraceptive use.

    Nevertheless, in Texas, which has the highest teenage birth rate in the country, an ardent minority is pushing abstinence-only information, or lack of information.

    Sarah Brown, who runs the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, says that the public argument is out of step with private reality. "We know that young people spend more time engaged in the media than in school, let alone in Mrs. Schmidt's health education class," she says.

    A lot of the deeper worries, she adds, are really about the popular and crude culture. "You don't know what to do about trash TV or stresses on the family or the latest story about hooking up or oral sex in middle school," she adds, "but you can go down to the school board and say, `I hate these two pages.' "

    So this is where we are. We have a shared agreement on the importance of teaching both abstinence and protection. We have as well a shared opposition to the culture that sells sex like doughnuts.

    But in politics we see only the most polarized debate in which we're told that we have to choose between A for abstinence and C for contraception. In this class, Texas gets an incomplete.

    Ellen Goodman's e-mail address is ellengoodman @globe.com.[/b][/quote]

  2. #2
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    CROSS-DRESSING DAY
    Townhall.com

    The Illinois Family Institute (IFI) received a troubling report yesterday of a grade (and middle) school in Carrier Mills that held an “Opposite Sex” Day in which students were encouraged to come to schools dressed as members of the opposite sex. At least one outraged mother pulled her children out of Carrier Mills-Stonefort Elementary School (kindergarten through 8th grade) after being informed about the cross-dressing day. Carrier Mills is about 45 minutes east of Carbondale.

    One school staffer reached by IFI said the school had no radical agenda but was just looking for “something silly for the kids to do.” But Laura Stanley, who has several children at Carrier Mills, was hardly amused. “This is not what I want my son taught at school,” she told me. “Kids are already getting so many confused messages from the culture. Do they need to be further confused about sexuality?”

    Stanley said that when she came to the school to sign out her children, she saw one boy wearing a pink mini-skirt that went right up to his behind. Had a girl been wearing the same dress, she said, it would have been a violation of the school dress code.

    “This is as wrong as wrong can get,” she told IFI. “When is enough enough?”

    Some male students stuffed their shirts to create mock breasts, according to Stanley and an employee of the school who opposed the special day and also spoke with IFI.

    The school employee, who requested anonymity, said many students did not dress in opposite sex attire, but added that school administrators asked students to bring in a canned good for charity if they chose not to cross-dress.

    Stanley said that after parents complained last year about a similar cross-dressing day, she was given the impression by Principal Charles Parks that it was a mistake and it wouldn’t happen again. Then she received the letter announcing this year’s identical event.

    I tried to call Parks but he did not return my call. Nor did Superintendent Richard Morgan .

    IFI informed the American Family Association Radio Network about the story, and AFA Radio will air a report on Carrier Mill’s “Opposite Sex Day” this week. AFA reporter Jim Brown told me that Parks refused to answer questions about the cross-dressing day.

    Even if the school’s administrators did not set out to advance a gender-confusion agenda, we agree with Mrs. Stanley that telling youngsters to cross-dress--in school of all places--is just plain dumb. Kids are already steeped in false and unnatural sex/gender messages--with female pop stars kissing each other for kicks and “transgender” activists suing schools for the “right” of boys to come to class in a dress. In such an environment, the last thing we need is for schools to promote more confusion about the sexes and gender roles.

    In addition, some homosexual men testify that in their youth that they practiced or were allowed to practice gender non-conforming behavior. That’s one reason why transvestites (cross-dressers, usually called "drag queens") are such a visible part of the homosexual male world.

    If you still doubt that there is a VERY organized and aggressive “transgender” agenda that encourages the elimination of gender norms, visit Gender PAC’s website at [url]www.gpac.org[/url] (WARNING: THIS IS AN ANTI-FAMILY WEBSITE THAT IS NOT APPROPRIATE FOR CHILDREN) and get educated on the political/cultural forces that are working to promote aberrant sexual and gender behaviors in this nation.

    And guess what? Gender PAC is extremely active with youth across the nation.

    Peter LaBarbera, formerly the executive director of Accuracy in Academia, now heads the Illinois Family Institute, [url]www.illinoisfamily.org[/url].



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Which one is worse?

  3. #3
    Kangaroo F*cker
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    Stupid idea by whoever thought that up but that was only one school not an entire State.

  4. #4
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    Gainzo - In Texas, the Comissioner of the Board of Education is appointed by the elected Governor. The rest of the 15-member State Board of Education are elected officials. If 90% of the good people of Texas people disagree with these things, they are free to vote any and all of these people out of office, and put different people into those roles. It's the great thing about democracy and federalism. It's how the system works. These officials are accountable to the people for their actions. What's the problem?

  5. #5
    Kangaroo F*cker
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by jets5ever[/i]@Nov 11 2004, 04:22 PM
    [b] Gainzo - In Texas, the Comissioner of the Board of Education is appointed by the elected Governor. The rest of the 15-member State Board of Education are elected officials. If 90% of the good people of Texas people disagree with these things, they are free to vote any and all of these people out of office, and put different people into those roles. It's the great thing about democracy and federalism. It's how the system works. These officials are accountable to the people for their actions. What's the problem? [/b][/quote]
    I was not aware of that. When were the last elections held? Was there active competition for these positions? I could go on and on.

    The bottom line is that this sets a rather scary precedent.

  6. #6
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by jets5ever[/i]@Nov 11 2004, 04:22 PM
    [b] Gainzo - In Texas, the Comissioner of the Board of Education is appointed by the elected Governor. The rest of the 15-member State Board of Education are elected officials. If 90% of the good people of Texas people disagree with these things, they are free to vote any and all of these people out of office, and put different people into those roles. It's the great thing about democracy and federalism. It's how the system works. These officials are accountable to the people for their actions. What's the problem? [/b][/quote]
    THANK YOU ... It seems I am finally making a dent around here :D

    [b]Bottom Line:[/b] Liberals don't like "democracy" when it challenges their assumptions ... that's where the elites usually go hunting for some left-wing judge to THWART DEMOCRACY

  7. #7
    Kangaroo F*cker
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    You guys are missing the point. If you are going to teach a Sexual Education Course why would you not mention contraception?

    This has nothing to do with left-wing vs. right-wing. It has everything to do with common sense. Especially in a state with the highest teen birth rate in the Country.

  8. #8
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Gainzo[/i]@Nov 11 2004, 04:36 PM
    [b] You guys are missing the point. If you are going to teach a Sexual Education Course why would you not mention contraception?

    This has nothing to do with left-wing vs. right-wing. It has everything to do with common sense. Especially in a state with the highest teen birth rate in the Country. [/b][/quote]
    They have been teaching birth control in sex-ed for years in texas ... so why is the pregnancy rate amongst teens so high?

    In fact, they have been teaching birth control in sex-ed throughout the USA for the better part of the past 30 years ... so why are teen pregnancy rates MUCH HIGHER nationwide than they were 30 or 40 years ago?

    Is it possible that once again the liberal assumption {well intentioned as it may have been} was wrong from the outset?

    Is it possible that teaching children abstanence was the right way to go all along?

    I'm not saying it is ... but is it possible?

    Can an abstanence curriculum have more disasterous results then the ones we have now ... using the liberal model of sex-ed over the past 30 years?

    These are just a few questions worth considering ... we have seen the results of the liberal model ... we've had 30 years to study it ... and the results are a momumental flop ... so why shouldn't parents, who are no doubt aware of the current failures, be allowed to try something else ... like oh say, the old model which may never have been broken to begin with?

    Compare the two ... compare the results ... are we better off as a nation in regards to teen pregnancy than we were 30+ years ago, or worse?

  9. #9
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Gainzo[/i]@Nov 11 2004, 04:36 PM
    [b] You guys are missing the point. If you are going to teach a Sexual Education Course why would you not mention contraception?

    This has nothing to do with left-wing vs. right-wing. It has everything to do with common sense. Especially in a state with the highest teen birth rate in the Country.

    Ironically, the state curriculum for health education still mandates that students "analyze the effectiveness and ineffectiveness of barrier protection and other contraceptive methods." But the books have expunged the information they're required to learn. [/b][/quote]
    You should go back and read your own article. It specifically states that the curriculum still calls for teaching safe sex methods. It simply states that that part has been left out of the text books.

  10. #10
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    Condoms don't feel good. That is why the rate is so high. It doesn't mean you should stop teaching about them.

  11. #11
    Kangaroo F*cker
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    Doesn't that send a mixed message to the students? We may or may not talk about condoms but it sure won't be mentioned in your text book. Oh and marriage is a [i]lifelong[/i] union between a man and a woman.

  12. #12
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Gainzo+Nov 11 2004, 04:29 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>[b]QUOTE[/b] (Gainzo &#064; Nov 11 2004, 04:29 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-jets5ever[/i]@Nov 11 2004, 04:22 PM
    [b] Gainzo - In Texas, the Comissioner of the Board of Education is appointed by the elected Governor. The rest of the 15-member State Board of Education are elected officials. If 90% of the good people of Texas people disagree with these things, they are free to vote any and all of these people out of office, and put different people into those roles. It&#39;s the great thing about democracy and federalism. It&#39;s how the system works. These officials are accountable to the people for their actions. What&#39;s the problem? [/b][/quote]
    I was not aware of that. When were the last elections held? Was there active competition for these positions? I could go on and on.

    The bottom line is that this sets a rather scary precedent. [/b][/quote]
    Gainzo - there are many aspects of local, state and national policy with which I disagree. So, I stay informed and I vote accordingly. Again, what is the problem? Who cares if there was active competition, or that you weren&#39;t aware of this, or whatever else? The world does not stop and start at your convenience. It is YOUR responsibility to stay informed and abreast of what is going on in the world around you.

    This is a policy enacted by legitimately elected officials, who are all accountable to their constituents. Again, if the people of Texas don&#39;t like it, they have a recourse to change it. If they do like it, then these people are doing their jobs well. My opinion or your opinion about it is irrelevant, in a practical sense.

    Do I think this stuff should be included in textbooks? Sure, I do. So, I vote accordingly in my home state.

  13. #13
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    *lurking and saying NOTHING*

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    Gainzo,
    Are you also "troubled" by the fact that that book describes marriage as between a man and a woman? The author of the story sure seems troubled by that.

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Gainzo[/i]@Nov 11 2004, 04:52 PM
    [b] Doesn&#39;t that send a mixed message to the students? We may or may not talk about condoms but it sure won&#39;t be mentioned in your text book. Oh and marriage is a [i]lifelong[/i] union between a man and a woman. [/b][/quote]
    You have a problem with the inclusion of the word lifelong in that definition? What would you prefer? What definition of marriage should we be teaching our kids?

    How about this: "Marriage is a union of variable length between two or more carbon-based life-forms."

  16. #16
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    We should teach kids to stand in front of microwaves while heating up their hot pockets. Then they will be nice and sterile, no problem.

  17. #17
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    Gainzo,

    Would you find it troubling to hear that some schools in New York are teaching children about homosexuality as part of the curriculum? Would you be happy about your 10 year old child learning about "Billy&#39;s two daddys?

  18. #18
    TomShane
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    When do we get to attend the book-burning?

  19. #19
    Kangaroo F*cker
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    This is a Sexual Education Course. Should homosexuality be teached? Yes, it is part of society.

    What is the legal definition of marriage? It sure as heck isn&#39;t a lifelong union for 50% of people who get married&#33;

  20. #20
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    As I read some of these responses it has struck me ... my work is done here ... you folks are finally thinking past all of the knee-jerk reactions we have been taught {by the left} to recite under such circumstances

    You are challenging the liberal assumptions ... I am proud of you all ;)

    PS. Ever notice that conservatives are given virtually no time at all to prove their thories can work in practice, but when liberals institute ideas they can fail for a generation or better and we still have to GIVE THEM MORE TIME

    Doesn&#39;t matter how disasterous the results may be, cause unlike those vile conservatives, their intentions are good

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