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Thread: Sexual Education

  1. #21
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    Do you only take one side on every issue?

  2. #22
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Gainzo[/i]@Nov 11 2004, 05:05 PM
    [b] This is a Sexual Education Course. Should homosexuality be teached? Yes, it is part of society.

    What is the legal definition of marriage? It sure as heck isn't a lifelong union for 50% of people who get married! [/b][/quote]
    Gainzo - I agree with you that these things should be in textbooks. But our personal opinions are not the arbiters of what constitutes right and wrong or sound policy. Everyone has opinions and our system is set up in a great fashion to handle such opposing views fairly and with due process and representation. Nobody is forced to live in Texas or remain in Texas. These policies are enacted by elected officials who are held accountable by the people of Texas. Sex Ed curriculum will conitnue to vary by state, as it should. No matter how noble or correct we feel our views to be, we are not the ones who should decide how children in Texas are educated...the people of Texas are. It is also very possible that we are wrong. I don't think it's likely, but it's possible and we cannot be so close-minded as to think that our opinions are always the correct ones. The State Board of Education in Texas has a different view on this issue, that is all. There's nothing "scary" about it in an intrinsic, universal sense - it is scary [i]in your opinion[/i], that is all. Other people think it's "right." We will see how it plays out and now we both know that if alternate types of Sex Ed are important to us, we should avoid living in Texas.

  3. #23
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    I think they should teach spanking, and S & M. Golden showers, too. I mean, what's wrong with that? It's normal. Heck, who are we to pass judgement on people that can only have an orgasm with a plastic bag over their head. Kids have a right to know.

  4. #24
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by jets5ever[/i]@Nov 11 2004, 05:15 PM
    [b] Gainzo - I agree with you that these things should be in textbooks. But our personal opinions are not the arbiters of what constitutes right and wrong or sound policy. Everyone has opinions and our system is set up in a great fashion to handle such opposing views fairly and with due process and representation. Nobody is forced to live in Texas or remain in Texas. These policies are enacted by elected officials who are held accountable by the people of Texas. Sex Ed curriculum will conitnue to vary by state, as it should. No matter how noble or correct we feel our views to be, we are not the ones who should decide how children in Texas are educated...the people of Texas are. It is also very possible that we are wrong. I don't think it's likely, but it's possible and we cannot be so close-minded as to think that our opinions are always the correct ones. The State Board of Education in Texas has a different view on this issue, that is all. There's nothing "scary" about it in an intrinsic, universal sense - it is scary [i]in your opinion[/i], that is all. Other people think it's "right." We will see how it plays out and now we both know that if alternate types of Sex Ed are important to us, we should avoid living in Texas. [/b][/quote]
    J5, spoken like a man who respects the democratic process

    I would only add that I favor vouchers for the parents who find themsleves in the minority ... I believe they should have the option of sending their children to a school that reflect their values ... I know it's not perfect and may be costly, but I believe there is nothing more sacred than a parents right to install their values into their children, so I support vouchers whole-heartedly

    Used to be a time when there were basic values the overwhelming majority agreed upon ... those days have long since disappeared ... our schools reflect these changes ... so I just think it's high time we rethink this whole education paradigm

    We can avoid many of these battles if parents have a choice ... can spend their tax monies that are alocated to the public schools on the schools of their choice ... and all parents walk away happy

    It's a radical change ... a complete shift away from the existing paradigm ... but I believe we are at that crossroad

    JMO

    PS. A little competition never hurt anyone ... the teachers unions may not like the idea, but the children can only win ... competition has a way of forcing people to rethink their failed assumptions and strive towards excellence

  5. #25
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    Just give the kids a Village People CD and the movie Cruisin', for homework.

    [img]http://www.melaman2.com/oldies/letters/disco/village-people.jpg[/img]

  6. #26
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Gainzo[/i]@Nov 11 2004, 04:01 PM
    [b] Not a good sign.

    Source:[url=http://www.boston.com/news/globe/editorial_opinion/oped/articles/2004/11/11/sex_education_texas_style/]Sex Education, Texas Style[/url]

    [quote][b]By Ellen Goodman, Globe Columnist | November 11, 2004

    HERE IT is, just days after the red states gave their presidential seal of approval to the man from Texas, and we've already been treated to another skirmish in the culture wars. The Texas Board of Education has given its educational seal of approval to what may soon be dubbed Red Sex Ed.

    The big news is the state's successful demand that textbook publishers change the description of marriage between "two people" to marriage between "a man and a woman." They also ordered that marriage be defined as "a lifelong union between a husband and a wife."

    Frankly, I found the "lifelong" description charming, considering that the Lone Star State has one of the highest divorce rates in the country. Massachusetts, by the way, has the lowest divorce rate in the country. We are so fond of marriage that we want everyone to do it.

    But never mind all that. The real heart of the textbook controversy is whether Texas students should learn about contraception. And the answer is no.

    Texas has now officially gone to abstinence-only textbooks. The students are learning the ABCs of sex ed without the C. And as Texas, the second-largest book buyer in the country, goes, so may go the nation.

    Only one of the four approved books even mentions contraceptives. The altered lessons teach students how to avoid sexually transmitted diseases in many ways -- including "getting plenty of rest" -- but not by using condoms. One actually suggests using latex gloves to avoid contact with blood but says nothing about using latex . . . you get the idea.

    Ironically, the state curriculum for health education still mandates that students "analyze the effectiveness and ineffectiveness of barrier protection and other contraceptive methods." But the books have expunged the information they're required to learn.

    In some ways, this Texas story is proof of how the abstinence-only lobby is flexing its muscle. But Americans are nowhere nearly as polarized over sex education as it appears in this public wrangling.

    Americans have come to some sort of uneasy understanding that sex education is not just about health but also about values. It's not just about biology but also about relationships.

    As Samantha Smoot, an opponent of textbook censorship who heads the Texas Freedom Network, says: "Everyone agrees that abstinence is the best choice for teenagers. And everyone thinks books should give kids real negotiation skills and information that helps them make responsible decisions." Last summer, some 90 percent of Texans surveyed said they wanted teens to learn about both abstinence and contraception.

    Americans, especially parents, believe that teenagers should delay sex, even if we have trouble answering the next question: Until when? Some believe sex should be postponed until that mystical age called maturity and others until marriage. Everyone seems to hope that their own kids will wait till they're no longer under our roof.

    But it turns out that most parents are pragmatic as well as worried. We have rules and fallback positions. We don't want our kids to drink, but we want them to call us for a ride home if they do. We don't want them to have sex, but we hope they'll use protection if they do. If that's a mixed message, it's a safety message. And it's working.

    Over the past decade, teen pregnancy and births are down by about 30 percent. As a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention scientist showed, just about half the decrease in pregnancy comes from abstinence and half from increased contraceptive use.

    Nevertheless, in Texas, which has the highest teenage birth rate in the country, an ardent minority is pushing abstinence-only information, or lack of information.

    Sarah Brown, who runs the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, says that the public argument is out of step with private reality. "We know that young people spend more time engaged in the media than in school, let alone in Mrs. Schmidt's health education class," she says.

    A lot of the deeper worries, she adds, are really about the popular and crude culture. "You don't know what to do about trash TV or stresses on the family or the latest story about hooking up or oral sex in middle school," she adds, "but you can go down to the school board and say, `I hate these two pages.' "

    So this is where we are. We have a shared agreement on the importance of teaching both abstinence and protection. We have as well a shared opposition to the culture that sells sex like doughnuts.

    But in politics we see only the most polarized debate in which we're told that we have to choose between A for abstinence and C for contraception. In this class, Texas gets an incomplete.

    Ellen Goodman's e-mail address is ellengoodman @globe.com.[/b][/quote] [/b][/quote]
    I think teachers should make their students do a homework assignment by watching this movie:

    [url=http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0080569/]http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0080569/[/url]

    6th graders too young? Ok, 7th graders, then. :lol:

  7. #27
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Gainzo[/i]@Nov 11 2004, 04:52 PM
    [b] Doesn't that send a mixed message to the students? We may or may not talk about condoms but it sure won't be mentioned in your text book. Oh and marriage is a [i]lifelong[/i] union between a man and a woman. [/b][/quote]
    Lets talk about the liberal f*CKED uo state of CA. They teach about Condoms alright. There was a report that in the school district that Duschbag Boxter lives in was teachibg 7th grade girls how to put condoms on a penis using there mouths.

    You libs tell me what is worse.

    I tell you, if my kids ever came home and said that they were going to school tomorrow dressed like the opposite sex. there would be a hurting teacher somewhere.

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