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Thread: It Seems The Lefties True Compassion

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    [url=http://www.americandaily.com/article/6355]http://www.americandaily.com/article/6355[/url]

    True Compassion Versus Liberal Grandstanding
    By Charles Cole (01/03/05)

    As we enter 2005 on the heels of the devastating natural disaster in Asia, it might be a good time to reflect on the matter of compassion. Our liberal friends are forever claiming that they “care” about people to a much greater extent than do conservatives, who are often portrayed in the “mainstream” media as being greedy, selfish misers, wholly insensitive to the plight of their fellow humans.

    This is another issue on which the facts simply do not corroborate the media’s distortion. Each year the Catalog for Philanthropy publishes a “Generosity Index” which portrays in graphic form the relative generosity of Americans. Average adjusted income of each state’s taxpayers is compared with the average itemized charitable contributions reported by those who itemize their deductions. This comparison produces a ranking of the states into a “generosity index”.

    Year after year, these data show the same pattern. The states with very low average incomes rank among the top ten in charitable giving. For example, Mississippi ranks fifth among the states in giving, but last (50th) in average income, resulting in that state’s being ranked number one in generosity. Interestingly, the top six states in average income (Connecticut, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Maryland, New York and California) all ranked quite low in the generosity index.

    A closer look at these rankings reveals some interesting facts, especially in light of the media’s portrayal of the people living in the various states. Residents of the “red states” – those Bush-voting, insensitive boobs and hicks – are often characterized as mean-spirited, callous morons in comparison to the “enlightened”, caring, and compassionate citizens of the “blue states”. As it turns out, the top 25 states on the Generosity Index are all red states! Quite interesting since only 5 red states made the top 20 in income, but all 10 of the poorest states are red! Conversely, the red states claimed 20 of the top 25 spots as to proportional giving, with the compassionate blue states capturing 7 of the bottom 10 spots in that category, including the bottom five.

    It turns out that the insensitive, Bible-thumping hicks from states like Mississippi, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Alabama, and Tennessee were rated as the top six states on this year’s Generosity Index, whereas the “enlightened”, caring, benevolent folks in the liberal states of Connecticut, Minnesota, Wisconsin, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire claimed the bottom seven positions on the index.

    If this seems counterintuitive, consider for a moment the difference between George W. Bush and that bastion of enlightened empathy, William Jefferson Clinton. One is content to do good for others in a quiet, unassuming manner. The other sprints toward every open microphone to remind us of the monumental achievements of his administration and how he always “felt our pain”.

    A comparison of these two men explains much of the disparity in genuine caring and true compassion between the quiet, empathetic members of our society and those who constantly bray about how deeply concerned they are about the plight of others. You see, liberals honestly believe that government is best suited to alleviate pain and suffering, whereas conservatives long ago understood that caring and compassion emanate from the heart of individuals who really do care about their neighbor’s lot in life.

    Viewed in this light, it is hardly surprising that the Generosity Index verifies these facts year after year. As President John Adams noted, "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclination, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." And the fact is that the enlightened, sophisticated liberals in many of the “blue states” are most generous with other people’s money, but seem a bit less willing to help others by using their own financial resources.

    So, next time you see some TV commentator or read some left-leaning opinion editorial column extolling the virtues of the enlightened liberals or excoriating the greed and insensitivity of the evil Republicans of the “religious right”, recall the Generosity Index. Who knows? One day we might even see liberal journalists, leftwing Democrat politicians, and university professors actually cite empirical data rather than hold forth with pompous assertions of their moral superiority as regards helping the poor.

  2. #2
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    All donations are not created equal. A donation to the NRA is not that same as a donation to the Red Cross, yet they are reported the same. There are hundreds of thousands of non-profits out there. I realize the average church-going Republican gives to their church, just because you choose to tyth(sp?) doesn't make you a more charitable person than someone who donates their time and labor rather than money.

    For the wealthy Republicans a large reason why they donate is for tax incentives. There are always exceptions, however.

    Take me for example, I donate a lot of time and energy on my community. I am involved in the local community group, I help my fiance run a Girl Scout troop, I teach free computer classes at the recreation center, yet none of that is a tax deduction. Am I less charitable than some guy who writes a $1000 check to some televangalist so he can build Praise Land?

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    You actually expect them to practice what they preach? :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Section109Row15[/i]@Jan 4 2005, 01:50 PM
    [b] All donations are not created equal. A donation to the NRA is not that same as a donation to the Red Cross, yet they are reported the same. There are hundreds of thousands of non-profits out there. I realize the average church-going Republican gives to their church, just because you choose to tyth(sp?) doesn't make you a more charitable person than someone who donates their time and labor rather than money.

    For the wealthy Republicans a large reason why they donate is for tax incentives. There are always exceptions, however.

    Take me for example, I donate a lot of time and energy on my community. I am involved in the local community group, I help my fiance run a Girl Scout troop, I teach free computer classes at the recreation center, yet none of that is a tax deduction. Am I less charitable than some guy who writes a $1000 check to some televangalist so he can build Praise Land? [/b][/quote]
    Actually very good points Section, but is your implication that people from Red states don't donate time/expertise and that the majority of donations aren't to true charities?

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Lawyers, Guns and Money+Jan 4 2005, 04:30 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>[b]QUOTE[/b] (Lawyers, Guns and Money @ Jan 4 2005, 04:30 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-Section109Row15[/i]@Jan 4 2005, 01:50 PM
    [b] All donations are not created equal. A donation to the NRA is not that same as a donation to the Red Cross, yet they are reported the same. There are hundreds of thousands of non-profits out there. I realize the average church-going Republican gives to their church, just because you choose to tyth(sp?) doesn&#39;t make you a more charitable person than someone who donates their time and labor rather than money.

    For the wealthy Republicans a large reason why they donate is for tax incentives. There are always exceptions, however.

    Take me for example, I donate a lot of time and energy on my community. I am involved in the local community group, I help my fiance run a Girl Scout troop, I teach free computer classes at the recreation center, yet none of that is a tax deduction. Am I less charitable than some guy who writes a &#036;1000 check to some televangalist so he can build Praise Land? [/b][/quote]
    Actually very good points Section, but is your implication that people from Red states don&#39;t donate time/expertise and that the majority of donations aren&#39;t to true charities? [/b][/quote]
    No I am just giving another perspective. I realize Americans in general are very generous. I&#39;m just trying to point out how the authors conclusions may be skewed.

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Section109Row15+Jan 4 2005, 02:34 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>[b]QUOTE[/b] (Section109Row15 @ Jan 4 2005, 02:34 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> [quote]Originally posted by Lawyers@ Guns and Money,Jan 4 2005, 04:30 PM
    [b] <!--QuoteBegin-Section109Row15[/i]@Jan 4 2005, 01:50 PM
    [b] All donations are not created equal. A donation to the NRA is not that same as a donation to the Red Cross, yet they are reported the same. There are hundreds of thousands of non-profits out there. I realize the average church-going Republican gives to their church, just because you choose to tyth(sp?) doesn&#39;t make you a more charitable person than someone who donates their time and labor rather than money.

    For the wealthy Republicans a large reason why they donate is for tax incentives. There are always exceptions, however.

    Take me for example, I donate a lot of time and energy on my community. I am involved in the local community group, I help my fiance run a Girl Scout troop, I teach free computer classes at the recreation center, yet none of that is a tax deduction. Am I less charitable than some guy who writes a &#036;1000 check to some televangalist so he can build Praise Land? [/b][/quote]
    Actually very good points Section, but is your implication that people from Red states don&#39;t donate time/expertise and that the majority of donations aren&#39;t to true charities? [/b][/quote]
    No I am just giving another perspective. I realize Americans in general are very generous. I&#39;m just trying to point out how the authors conclusions may be skewed. [/b][/quote]
    like I said good point. The author definately has an agenda, but the study is still somewhat interesting

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    Most white trash from the red states give their money to their local racist whacko churches---Big deal.

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by rextilleon[/i]@Jan 5 2005, 06:30 PM
    [b] Most white trash from the red states give their money to their local racist whacko churches---Big deal. [/b][/quote]
    Now isn&#39;t that the "pot calling the kettle black"

    Childish post. Childish argument.

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    Hick and intellectuals like you are the ones who stir it up but can&#39;t take a littler slap back---So typically right wing

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    Donating money to the islamo-facist regimes that run most of the devastated countries is simply putting more money into weapons which will later be used to kill Americans.

    Just ask Michael Savage, he&#39;ll tell you.

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    How many channels has the racist Savage been thrown off---He is the new Wally George.

  12. #12
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Section109Row15[/i]@Jan 4 2005, 01:50 PM
    [b] All donations are not created equal. A donation to the NRA is not that same as a donation to the Red Cross, yet they are reported the same. There are hundreds of thousands of non-profits out there. I realize the average church-going Republican gives to their church, just because you choose to tyth(sp?) doesn&#39;t make you a more charitable person than someone who donates their time and labor rather than money.

    For the wealthy Republicans a large reason why they donate is for tax incentives. There are always exceptions, however.

    Take me for example, I donate a lot of time and energy on my community. I am involved in the local community group, I help my fiance run a Girl Scout troop, I teach free computer classes at the recreation center, yet none of that is a tax deduction. Am I less charitable than some guy who writes a &#036;1000 check to some televangalist so he can build Praise Land? [/b][/quote]
    You should call the IRS to verify

    ...volunteers who itemize their deductions to recognize expenses incurred while volunteering as "charitable deductions." Certain professions, such as lawyers and accountants, also may deduct the value of their time by using standard hourly rates. Volunteers may not deduct the value of their time spent volunteering, however, they can deduct related out-of-pocket expenses such as phone calls, postage, and transportation costs. If a volunteer uses their car to travel to and from their volunteer commitments, they can deduct the actual cost of gas and oil as well as parking fees and tolls. They can also claim other incidental expenses, such as the cost of cleaning a volunteer uniform.
    If a volunteer is required to travel away from home overnight, they can deduct lodging costs and a portion of the amount spent on meals—as long as there is no "significant amount of personal pleasure, recreation or vacation" to the trip.
    These out-of-pocket expenses are categorized as cash contributions and should be entered as such on the volunteer&#39;s tax return.


    Stay away from the Girl Scouts :D

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by flushingjet+Jan 6 2005, 01:21 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>[b]QUOTE[/b] (flushingjet @ Jan 6 2005, 01:21 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-Section109Row15[/i]@Jan 4 2005, 01:50 PM
    [b] All donations are not created equal. A donation to the NRA is not that same as a donation to the Red Cross, yet they are reported the same. There are hundreds of thousands of non-profits out there. I realize the average church-going Republican gives to their church, just because you choose to tyth(sp?) doesn&#39;t make you a more charitable person than someone who donates their time and labor rather than money.

    For the wealthy Republicans a large reason why they donate is for tax incentives. There are always exceptions, however.

    Take me for example, I donate a lot of time and energy on my community. I am involved in the local community group, I help my fiance run a Girl Scout troop, I teach free computer classes at the recreation center, yet none of that is a tax deduction. Am I less charitable than some guy who writes a &#036;1000 check to some televangalist so he can build Praise Land? [/b][/quote]
    You should call the IRS to verify

    ...volunteers who itemize their deductions to recognize expenses incurred while volunteering as "charitable deductions." Certain professions, such as lawyers and accountants, also may deduct the value of their time by using standard hourly rates. Volunteers may not deduct the value of their time spent volunteering, however, they can deduct related out-of-pocket expenses such as phone calls, postage, and transportation costs. If a volunteer uses their car to travel to and from their volunteer commitments, they can deduct the actual cost of gas and oil as well as parking fees and tolls. They can also claim other incidental expenses, such as the cost of cleaning a volunteer uniform.
    If a volunteer is required to travel away from home overnight, they can deduct lodging costs and a portion of the amount spent on meals—as long as there is no "significant amount of personal pleasure, recreation or vacation" to the trip.
    These out-of-pocket expenses are categorized as cash contributions and should be entered as such on the volunteer&#39;s tax return.


    Stay away from the Girl Scouts :D [/b][/quote]
    How many people itemize volunteer work? I&#39;m not a Republican, I donate my time and energy to help people, not my wallet.

    Don&#39;t worry about me and the Girl Scouts, I&#39;m able to control myself around children, I&#39;m not a memeber of the clergy.

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Warfish[/i]@Jan 5 2005, 09:55 PM
    [b] Donating money to the islamo-facist regimes that run most of the devastated countries is simply putting more money into weapons which will later be used to kill Americans.

    Just ask Michael Savage, he&#39;ll tell you. [/b][/quote]
    Yes, because Michael Savage has a chance of being pyschologically stable. I don&#39;t believe Indonesia is quite so radical as the Middle East and I&#39;m sure the people of Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India, and all the other places who were hit are guilty of nothing.

    Listening to Michael Savage is not something I would recommend if one wants to maintain their sanity.

  15. #15
    flushingjet
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Section109Row15+Jan 6 2005, 12:45 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>[b]QUOTE[/b] (Section109Row15 @ Jan 6 2005, 12:45 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> [quote]Originally posted by flushingjet@Jan 6 2005, 01:21 AM
    [b] <!--QuoteBegin-Section109Row15[/i]@Jan 4 2005, 01:50 PM
    [b] All donations are not created equal. A donation to the NRA is not that same as a donation to the Red Cross, yet they are reported the same. There are hundreds of thousands of non-profits out there. I realize the average church-going Republican gives to their church, just because you choose to tyth(sp?) doesn&#39;t make you a more charitable person than someone who donates their time and labor rather than money.

    For the wealthy Republicans a large reason why they donate is for tax incentives. There are always exceptions, however.

    Take me for example, I donate a lot of time and energy on my community. I am involved in the local community group, I help my fiance run a Girl Scout troop, I teach free computer classes at the recreation center, yet none of that is a tax deduction. Am I less charitable than some guy who writes a &#036;1000 check to some televangalist so he can build Praise Land? [/b][/quote]
    You should call the IRS to verify

    ...volunteers who itemize their deductions to recognize expenses incurred while volunteering as "charitable deductions." Certain professions, such as lawyers and accountants, also may deduct the value of their time by using standard hourly rates. Volunteers may not deduct the value of their time spent volunteering, however, they can deduct related out-of-pocket expenses such as phone calls, postage, and transportation costs. If a volunteer uses their car to travel to and from their volunteer commitments, they can deduct the actual cost of gas and oil as well as parking fees and tolls. They can also claim other incidental expenses, such as the cost of cleaning a volunteer uniform.
    If a volunteer is required to travel away from home overnight, they can deduct lodging costs and a portion of the amount spent on meals—as long as there is no "significant amount of personal pleasure, recreation or vacation" to the trip.
    These out-of-pocket expenses are categorized as cash contributions and should be entered as such on the volunteer&#39;s tax return.


    Stay away from the Girl Scouts :D [/b][/quote]
    How many people itemize volunteer work? I&#39;m not a Republican, I donate my time and energy to help people, not my wallet.

    Don&#39;t worry about me and the Girl Scouts, I&#39;m able to control myself around children, I&#39;m not a memeber of the clergy. [/b][/quote]
    you really have issues with religion and Republicans dont you? but if you want to denigrate others charitable motives AND overpay your taxes just keep on keeping on.

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