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Thread: Alan Keyes kicks daughter out of his house

  1. #1
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    Alan Keyes has kicked his gay daughter, Maya, out of his house, because she is gay. She has been accepted to Brown, and he will not pay the tuition.

    [url=http://www.boston.com/news/globe/editorial_opinion/oped/articles/2005/02/20/abandoned_but_not_alone/]http://www.boston.com/news/globe/editorial..._but_not_alone/[/url]

    Abandoned but not alone
    By Thomas Oliphant, Globe Columnist | February 20, 2005

    WASHINGTON

    FORGET Alan Keyes -- the right-wing tub-thumper, the talk-show noisemaker, the Republican pol, the conservative ''Christian," the dad who abandoned his teenager because she happens to be gay.

    The person to care about and take an interest in is Maya Keyes -- the daughter, the young woman who got into Brown University, the kid who spent time teaching in India. Sadly, she is anything but a unique case of a budding scholar instantly impoverished by vindictive parents on the threshold of life.

    On the brighter side, it turns out she is not alone, but in the embrace of an organization that was set up a few years ago to help in heart-breaking situations like hers. Thanks to The Point Foundation, she will make it to Brown after all. She will not only have financial aid, she will have at least one adult mentor to confide in as her undergraduate life unfolds.

    She will have to work hard to keep her aid, too. She must maintain the equivalent of a 3.5 grade-point average and design a community service program for her ''spare" time. Where higher education is concerned, that is as it should be. It's supposed to be hard, just not impossible because of cruel parents

    So will it go for 40 other young people honored a year ago with Point Foundation assistance. Vance Lancaster, the executive director, told me more than 1,000 teenagers applied for help last year, nearly 3,000 this year. What that means is, as he put it, ''Maya Keyes is . . . only the tip of an iceberg, especially when you realize that we are unable to do all that much outreach to kids nationally." The foundation was established by a group of people who as students 30 years ago had also faced parental abandonment because they happened to be gay. They persevered, made it, and then made it big, resolving that they would use some of their wealth to provide the help they lacked. That what happened is still happening is a reminder that the fundamental sources of bigotry remain strong.

    At the foundation, there's a story behind nearly every kid they help. One of the most poignant involves a freshman at Boston University, who is from Kentucky. Rummaging through his stuff one day, his father found a diary that disclosed his son's then-secret. When the young man returned home, he was led upstairs to his room, shown a packed suitcase, told his relatives had been contacted to make sure he was shunned, and then kicked out of the house by the father.

    After being taken in by kind souls in his community, there was an attempt at partial reconciliation at home, which ended abruptly when the kid's parents cut off his Internet access after they discovered his contacts with the foundation.

    Lancaster, who encounters this kind of heartbreak on almost every application, said there are cases of kids being rejected when they sought loans and scholarships in their communities, including young people who were National Merit scholars and graduation valedictorians.

    Reconciliation with initially cruel behavior by parents is something the foundation tries its best to encourage, but it is never easy. Lancaster mentioned one case -- of a freshman at UCLA who is only 16 because he skipped two grades as a child -- where the very process of applying to the foundation had given the family a topic to discuss, even though the topic of the kid's very identity was too raw.

    The intense pain and anguish of these rejected kids is one reason the Point people are so determined to go beyond merely providing financial assistance. If needed, they provide an adult to be there on the first day of college, so that one of the more joyous rites of passage (the unloading of the car at the dormitory) doesn't take place in solitude. In the summer, there are retreats to expose students to career opportunities and to successful adults.

    The idea is to combat the forces of marginalization that face young people trying to cope with sexual and gender identity. The societal forces are ugly enough; it is unspeakable that they would include so many parents.

    The good news in the Keyes story is that the real grown-up in the family is going to have her chance. The tougher news is that only 40 such young people can currently be assisted. The foundation ([url]www.thepointfoundation.org[/url]) has an active board, as well as an anonymous angel who underwrites its administrative and fund-raising costs. Every buck donated goes directly to help a young person.

    The idea is not to undermine parents; it is to keep parents from undermining their kids' future.


    It's nice to know that there are some in this world with hearts.

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    Okay, we get it already curtis. You are very big into the whole gay thing.

    Not that there's anything wrong with that.

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    I guess she can always just get a job and pay for her education like I did.

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by curtisthegreat[/i]@Feb 20 2005, 02:35 PM
    [b] Alan Keyes has kicked his gay daughter, Maya, out of his house, because she is gay. She has been accepted to Brown, and he will not pay the tuition.

    [url=http://www.boston.com/news/globe/editorial_opinion/oped/articles/2005/02/20/abandoned_but_not_alone/]http://www.boston.com/news/globe/editorial..._but_not_alone/[/url]

    Abandoned but not alone
    By Thomas Oliphant, Globe Columnist | February 20, 2005

    WASHINGTON

    FORGET Alan Keyes -- the right-wing tub-thumper, the talk-show noisemaker, the Republican pol, the conservative ''Christian," the dad who abandoned his teenager because she happens to be gay.

    The person to care about and take an interest in is Maya Keyes -- the daughter, the young woman who got into Brown University, the kid who spent time teaching in India. Sadly, she is anything but a unique case of a budding scholar instantly impoverished by vindictive parents on the threshold of life.

    On the brighter side, it turns out she is not alone, but in the embrace of an organization that was set up a few years ago to help in heart-breaking situations like hers. Thanks to The Point Foundation, she will make it to Brown after all. She will not only have financial aid, she will have at least one adult mentor to confide in as her undergraduate life unfolds.

    She will have to work hard to keep her aid, too. She must maintain the equivalent of a 3.5 grade-point average and design a community service program for her ''spare" time. Where higher education is concerned, that is as it should be. It's supposed to be hard, just not impossible because of cruel parents

    So will it go for 40 other young people honored a year ago with Point Foundation assistance. Vance Lancaster, the executive director, told me more than 1,000 teenagers applied for help last year, nearly 3,000 this year. What that means is, as he put it, ''Maya Keyes is . . . only the tip of an iceberg, especially when you realize that we are unable to do all that much outreach to kids nationally." The foundation was established by a group of people who as students 30 years ago had also faced parental abandonment because they happened to be gay. They persevered, made it, and then made it big, resolving that they would use some of their wealth to provide the help they lacked. That what happened is still happening is a reminder that the fundamental sources of bigotry remain strong.

    At the foundation, there's a story behind nearly every kid they help. One of the most poignant involves a freshman at Boston University, who is from Kentucky. Rummaging through his stuff one day, his father found a diary that disclosed his son's then-secret. When the young man returned home, he was led upstairs to his room, shown a packed suitcase, told his relatives had been contacted to make sure he was shunned, and then kicked out of the house by the father.

    After being taken in by kind souls in his community, there was an attempt at partial reconciliation at home, which ended abruptly when the kid's parents cut off his Internet access after they discovered his contacts with the foundation.

    Lancaster, who encounters this kind of heartbreak on almost every application, said there are cases of kids being rejected when they sought loans and scholarships in their communities, including young people who were National Merit scholars and graduation valedictorians.

    Reconciliation with initially cruel behavior by parents is something the foundation tries its best to encourage, but it is never easy. Lancaster mentioned one case -- of a freshman at UCLA who is only 16 because he skipped two grades as a child -- where the very process of applying to the foundation had given the family a topic to discuss, even though the topic of the kid's very identity was too raw.

    The intense pain and anguish of these rejected kids is one reason the Point people are so determined to go beyond merely providing financial assistance. If needed, they provide an adult to be there on the first day of college, so that one of the more joyous rites of passage (the unloading of the car at the dormitory) doesn't take place in solitude. In the summer, there are retreats to expose students to career opportunities and to successful adults.

    The idea is to combat the forces of marginalization that face young people trying to cope with sexual and gender identity. The societal forces are ugly enough; it is unspeakable that they would include so many parents.

    The good news in the Keyes story is that the real grown-up in the family is going to have her chance. The tougher news is that only 40 such young people can currently be assisted. The foundation ([url]www.thepointfoundation.org[/url]) has an active board, as well as an anonymous angel who underwrites its administrative and fund-raising costs. Every buck donated goes directly to help a young person.

    The idea is not to undermine parents; it is to keep parents from undermining their kids' future.


    It's nice to know that there are some in this world with hearts. [/b][/quote]
    lol

  5. #5
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by JetMan55+Feb 21 2005, 06:33 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>[b]QUOTE[/b] (JetMan55 @ Feb 21 2005, 06:33 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-curtisthegreat[/i]@Feb 20 2005, 02:35 PM
    [b] Alan Keyes has kicked his gay daughter, Maya, out of his house, because she is gay. She has been accepted to Brown, and he will not pay the tuition.

    [url=http://www.boston.com/news/globe/editorial_opinion/oped/articles/2005/02/20/abandoned_but_not_alone/]http://www.boston.com/news/globe/editorial..._but_not_alone/[/url]

    Abandoned but not alone
    By Thomas Oliphant, Globe Columnist | February 20, 2005

    WASHINGTON

    FORGET Alan Keyes -- the right-wing tub-thumper, the talk-show noisemaker, the Republican pol, the conservative &#39;&#39;Christian," the dad who abandoned his teenager because she happens to be gay.

    The person to care about and take an interest in is Maya Keyes -- the daughter, the young woman who got into Brown University, the kid who spent time teaching in India. Sadly, she is anything but a unique case of a budding scholar instantly impoverished by vindictive parents on the threshold of life.

    On the brighter side, it turns out she is not alone, but in the embrace of an organization that was set up a few years ago to help in heart-breaking situations like hers. Thanks to The Point Foundation, she will make it to Brown after all. She will not only have financial aid, she will have at least one adult mentor to confide in as her undergraduate life unfolds.

    She will have to work hard to keep her aid, too. She must maintain the equivalent of a 3.5 grade-point average and design a community service program for her &#39;&#39;spare" time. Where higher education is concerned, that is as it should be. It&#39;s supposed to be hard, just not impossible because of cruel parents

    So will it go for 40 other young people honored a year ago with Point Foundation assistance. Vance Lancaster, the executive director, told me more than 1,000 teenagers applied for help last year, nearly 3,000 this year. What that means is, as he put it, &#39;&#39;Maya Keyes is . . . only the tip of an iceberg, especially when you realize that we are unable to do all that much outreach to kids nationally." The foundation was established by a group of people who as students 30 years ago had also faced parental abandonment because they happened to be gay. They persevered, made it, and then made it big, resolving that they would use some of their wealth to provide the help they lacked. That what happened is still happening is a reminder that the fundamental sources of bigotry remain strong.

    At the foundation, there&#39;s a story behind nearly every kid they help. One of the most poignant involves a freshman at Boston University, who is from Kentucky. Rummaging through his stuff one day, his father found a diary that disclosed his son&#39;s then-secret. When the young man returned home, he was led upstairs to his room, shown a packed suitcase, told his relatives had been contacted to make sure he was shunned, and then kicked out of the house by the father.

    After being taken in by kind souls in his community, there was an attempt at partial reconciliation at home, which ended abruptly when the kid&#39;s parents cut off his Internet access after they discovered his contacts with the foundation.

    Lancaster, who encounters this kind of heartbreak on almost every application, said there are cases of kids being rejected when they sought loans and scholarships in their communities, including young people who were National Merit scholars and graduation valedictorians.

    Reconciliation with initially cruel behavior by parents is something the foundation tries its best to encourage, but it is never easy. Lancaster mentioned one case -- of a freshman at UCLA who is only 16 because he skipped two grades as a child -- where the very process of applying to the foundation had given the family a topic to discuss, even though the topic of the kid&#39;s very identity was too raw.

    The intense pain and anguish of these rejected kids is one reason the Point people are so determined to go beyond merely providing financial assistance. If needed, they provide an adult to be there on the first day of college, so that one of the more joyous rites of passage (the unloading of the car at the dormitory) doesn&#39;t take place in solitude. In the summer, there are retreats to expose students to career opportunities and to successful adults.

    The idea is to combat the forces of marginalization that face young people trying to cope with sexual and gender identity. The societal forces are ugly enough; it is unspeakable that they would include so many parents.

    The good news in the Keyes story is that the real grown-up in the family is going to have her chance. The tougher news is that only 40 such young people can currently be assisted. The foundation ([url]www.thepointfoundation.org[/url]) has an active board, as well as an anonymous angel who underwrites its administrative and fund-raising costs. Every buck donated goes directly to help a young person.

    The idea is not to undermine parents; it is to keep parents from undermining their kids&#39; future.


    It&#39;s nice to know that there are some in this world with hearts. [/b][/quote]
    lol [/b][/quote]
    Another brilliant post from Jetman55

    Add another number to the post count

  6. #6
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    [quote][i]Originally posted by The Gun Of Bavaria[/i]@Feb 21 2005, 09:43 PM
    [b] Another brilliant post from Jetman55

    Add another number to the post count [/b][/quote]
    Now he&#39;s invading the political forum.

    First he disrupted the MLB forum, now the political, what&#39;s next, the Everything Else? :lol:

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by shakin318[/i]@Feb 20 2005, 03:45 PM
    [b] Okay, we get it already curtis. You are very big into the whole gay thing.

    Not that there&#39;s anything wrong with that. [/b][/quote]
    Wow. You called me gay. How Republican/1st grade of you. I guess I&#39;m trying to say I find it disturbing that despicable human beings such as Alan Keyes are accepted in today&#39;s Republican party. Yeah, I guess I&#39;m a queer homo fag because I think gay people should be treated like, I dunno, human beings. By the way Shakin, today&#39;s GOP is very different than it was 100-150 years ago, as was the Democratic Party. The Radical Republicans in Congress of the post Civil War Era believed in imposing very harsh punishments on the traitourous Southern States, believed in giving rights to blacks and to women. In other words, they were *gasp* liberal then. And Democrats were conservative. Of course Republicans are still radical, just in a completely different way.

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    Alan Keyes is a tool and is an embarrasment to the Republican party. We already know this so what&#39;s your point ?

    "I guess I&#39;m trying to say I find it disturbing that despicable human beings such as Alan Keyes are accepted in today&#39;s Republican party."

    Yeah, there are a lot of despicable human beings in politics on both sides of the aile. Robert Byrd was in the KKK and Teddy Kennedy killed a woman in a DWI. Both are far more prominent members of their party than Keyes. Where&#39;s your outrage over them ?

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by curtisthegreat+Feb 23 2005, 12:16 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>[b]QUOTE[/b] (curtisthegreat @ Feb 23 2005, 12:16 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-shakin318[/i]@Feb 20 2005, 03:45 PM
    [b] Okay, we get it already curtis. You are very big into the whole gay thing.

    Not that there&#39;s anything wrong with that. [/b][/quote]
    Wow. You called me gay. How Republican/1st grade of you. I guess I&#39;m trying to say I find it disturbing that despicable human beings such as Alan Keyes are accepted in today&#39;s Republican party. Yeah, I guess I&#39;m a queer homo fag because I think gay people should be treated like, I dunno, human beings. By the way Shakin, today&#39;s GOP is very different than it was 100-150 years ago, as was the Democratic Party. The Radical Republicans in Congress of the post Civil War Era believed in imposing very harsh punishments on the traitourous Southern States, believed in giving rights to blacks and to women. In other words, they were *gasp* liberal then. And Democrats were conservative. Of course Republicans are still radical, just in a completely different way. [/b][/quote]
    No one is calling you gay. I was simply making an observation on the fact that you seem to pipe up loudly whenever the topic at hand is about homosexuality (except when your fellow lefty bitonti makes "homo" jokes -- then you are noticeably silent).

    As far as despicable human beings being in either party, there&#39;s not enough time in the day to list even a fraction of the despicable scumbags and the mosaic of loony dirtbag interest groups that have hijacked the democratic party.

    Nice overreaction, muscles. Try Sanka.

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    This once again has LITTLE to do with the gay issue and MORE to do with the family calues issue. She was your seed Keyes, now you have abandoned her? How can you preach family values when you have completely tossed yours to the side. Even that mongrel Dick Cheney has managed to keep a relationship with his lesbian daughter.

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    ps the big ASSUMPTION here is that he kicked her out SOLELY because she is gay.

    Don&#39;t let a search for facts get in the way of a good Republican-bashing story.

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by shakin318[/i]@Feb 23 2005, 12:17 PM
    [b] ps the big ASSUMPTION here is that he kicked her out SOLELY because she is gay.

    Don&#39;t let a search for facts get in the way of a good Republican-bashing story. [/b][/quote]
    If you are Alan Keyes and your political party is trying to ban gay marriage and your DAUGHTER is gay what other conclusion could you arrive at? I mean the agenda of his party is to deny the right for his daughter to live a happy life with a significant other. I mean ASSUMPTION is wrong but when the facts of the republican agenda align with Keyes actions it is hard not to assume.

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    Newsflash - Kerry opposed gay marriages too.

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by jets5ever[/i]@Feb 23 2005, 04:06 PM
    [b] Newsflash - Kerry opposed gay marriages too. [/b][/quote]
    That is because he is a panderer and he realized the extreme hatred towards gays as is evident by the marriage ammendments that passed. (I realize you don&#39;t see it that way.) It would have been political suicide to come out and say he supported gay marriage. He did say he supported civil unions as did Bush, the difference is that I think he actually means it while Bush is not sincerly going to act on that.

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by Section109Row15+Feb 23 2005, 03:39 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>[b]QUOTE[/b] (Section109Row15 @ Feb 23 2005, 03:39 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-jets5ever[/i]@Feb 23 2005, 04:06 PM
    [b] Newsflash - Kerry opposed gay marriages too. [/b][/quote]
    That is because he is a panderer and he realized the extreme hatred towards gays as is evident by the marriage ammendments that passed. (I realize you don&#39;t see it that way.) It would have been political suicide to come out and say he supported gay marriage. He did say he supported civil unions as did Bush, the difference is that I think he actually means it while Bush is not sincerly going to act on that. [/b][/quote]
    So, in short, Kerry means what he says, except when what he says could be construed as hateful, which case he is merely a panderer, and Bush [i]doesn&#39;t [/i]mean what he says, except when what he says can be construed as hateful, in which case he is hateful? Amazing&#33;

    Look, re: Keyes - the guy is an a-hole, flat-out. I am sure there is more to the story than what this article is saying...but I have followed Keyes&#39; career for quite some time and even voted for him in the 2000 primaries and this disownment or whatever it is fits with his character as I understand it. I am not exactly proud of that vote presently...and probably should have gone with McCain. (I voted for Buchanon in the 2000 general election) I lost a lot of respect for Keyes when he agreed to carpet-bag against Obama. It sounds trite, but the Keyes of 10 years ago would have laughed at such things...and he spoke about reparations, etc. Just completely divorced himself from the integrity of his past, as I saw it.

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by shakin318[/i]@Feb 23 2005, 01:17 PM
    [b] ps the big ASSUMPTION here is that he kicked her out SOLELY because she is gay.

    Don&#39;t let a search for facts get in the way of a good Republican-bashing story. [/b][/quote]
    you&#39;re right - it was probably because she was going to brown. i mean [i]brown[/i]&#33;?&#33;?&#33; come on. i heard she got into NYIT too, and she chose [i]brown[/i]. i&#39;d give her the boot, too.

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    [quote][i]Originally posted by jets5ever+Feb 23 2005, 07:59 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>[b]QUOTE[/b] (jets5ever @ Feb 23 2005, 07:59 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> [quote]Originally posted by Section109Row15@Feb 23 2005, 03:39 PM
    [b] <!--QuoteBegin-jets5ever[/i]@Feb 23 2005, 04:06 PM
    [b] Newsflash - Kerry opposed gay marriages too. [/b][/quote]
    That is because he is a panderer and he realized the extreme hatred towards gays as is evident by the marriage ammendments that passed. (I realize you don&#39;t see it that way.) It would have been political suicide to come out and say he supported gay marriage. He did say he supported civil unions as did Bush, the difference is that I think he actually means it while Bush is not sincerly going to act on that. [/b][/quote]
    So, in short, Kerry means what he says, except when what he says could be construed as hateful, which case he is merely a panderer, and Bush [i]doesn&#39;t [/i]mean what he says, except when what he says can be construed as hateful, in which case he is hateful? Amazing&#33;

    Look, re: Keyes - the guy is an a-hole, flat-out. I am sure there is more to the story than what this article is saying...but I have followed Keyes&#39; career for quite some time and even voted for him in the 2000 primaries and this disownment or whatever it is fits with his character as I understand it. I am not exactly proud of that vote presently...and probably should have gone with McCain. (I voted for Buchanon in the 2000 general election) I lost a lot of respect for Keyes when he agreed to carpet-bag against Obama. It sounds trite, but the Keyes of 10 years ago would have laughed at such things...and he spoke about reparations, etc. Just completely divorced himself from the integrity of his past, as I saw it. [/b][/quote]
    I meant exactly how you interpreted it. That is how he became known as a flip-flopper.

    Bush does the same thing as evident by the audio tapes let out the other day. You have to take a stance that will get you the most votes. Bush can&#39;t come out and bash gays even though that is an underlying theme of many conservatives.

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