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Thread: The Tragedy of New Orleans & The Major Media

  1. #1

    The Tragedy of New Orleans & The Major Media

    I only have one very simple question....

    Has anyone else found the wall-to-wall coverage, and over-the-top "reporting" on the scene by the Major MEdia networks (CNN, ABC, NBC< FOX, etc.) to be.....well, to be a little ghoulish.

    For example, I;ve been watching FoxNews Channel today, and I can't tell you how many times I've heard, in a tone that sounds serious but has a hint, just a hint, of excitement behind it (as if they feel they are a part of history and how lucky they are to be the one reporting it), saying such things as "New Orleans in now a Dead City, a contaminated City filled with human waste.....and bodies....yet to be recovered. Thousands are now feared Dead.".

    Yes, I want this to be covered, but the ghoulish, almost happy-to-be-the-reporter tone of the coverage today has really seemed disturbing after a while.

    Is it just me?

  2. #2
    Foxnews does a good job covering the hot story IMO.
    I dont detect any glee in their reporting at all.

    Their coverage of the natalie Holloway story, while of interest to me, has been more soap opera-ish.

    This disaster has knocked aruba off their front page (the arubans must feel like gary conduit? whatsisname? (chondra levy), when 9/11 hit.

    But as a viewer, if you watch too much of the coverage it can get to you.

  3. #3
    I remember directly after 9/11 NBC news kept showing the towers come down over and over and over and over......

  4. #4
    It was a horrible sight to see. I think that one of the reasons it was showed so often was because there was an understanding that they would not show jumpers, so they just showed the buildings.

  5. #5
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    [QUOTE=AlbanyJet]I remember directly after 9/11 NBC news kept showing the towers come down over and over and over and over......[/QUOTE]

    They are always over the top in their coverage...it is what keeps people glued to the TV.

    I will never forget watching the morning of 9-11 on CNN; the Washington Mall was on fire, a bomb went off in the Capitol, three muslims in a white van full of explosives were heading up the NJ Turnpike towards the GW Bridge, the next attacks were coming....

    Even this...last night CNN reported huge riots at a prison in Baton Rouge where the prisoners had taken guards as hostages...late this morning they said "armed looters had made their way and taken over part of a hospital (Tulane?) and were holding nurses/doctors hostage...the insinuation was they wanted drugs....

    Too many times they create rather then just report...it is a tragic situation down there and God help those people but the MSM wants you to believe the world is ending....

  6. #6
    I cant see how these journalists report these terrible stories day in and day out.

    I think sometimes they are numb to it

  7. #7
    Hellish.

    First hand account via email, from a friend:

    [I]I'm out of New Orleans.

    I made it to Baton Rouge in my car with my backup tapes, my most important instruments (three of my Steinbergers, my favorite acoustic, and my rack), my laptops, my diplomas, and about 5 day's worth of clothes. It seems this is all I own now. I live nine blocks from Lake Pontchartrain, and the wind was blowing from the north. My neighborhood has 9 feet of water. I live on the second floor, but I'm not certain my building even stands. Many don't.

    My parents and grandparents lost their houses. Well, the structures still stand, but the water level is halfway up the rooftops of the houses in their neighborhoods.

    When I left the city, things were rapidly deteriorating. I drove through a flash point in front of the convention center on the way the hell out of Dodge. They were shooting at helicopters, fireman, policemen, buildings, each other. All of the stores have been looted. Pawn shops and Wal-Marts were emptied of guns, and the mother****ers were interested in shooting.

    It's far, far worse than you can imagine--worse than it looks on TV. I got my first glimpse of the news a little while ago right after I had my first shower since Saturday evening. (By the way --, I used the Roquefort-smelling nutsack comparison to many laughs this morning. Thanks for letting me borrow your material.)

    I don't know where to start. I've seen so many things that I care not see again. I didn't break down until I checked my email a little while ago. Thank you all for the kind words and the support. The past couple of days have been about survival for most of the people in the city. And the death. I don't know what the **** people are talking about when they say numbers so low. I've heard from NOPD and NOFD that many people died in their attics of asphyxiation, heat, or drowning. Houses where known deaths occurred were marked; they're interested in survivors right now. There have been hundreds of deaths in New Orleans alone. There are bodies floating in neighborhoods. Police officers are leaving them in the water for now. People are being plucked from rooftops. Children's Hospital is under siege. There was a fire in a looted building on Canal Street--the city center.

    And ignorant *******s are out of their ****ing minds. They alone will be responsible for more deaths because they're interfering with search and rescue operations. You probably won't see that **** on CNN.

    I vacillate between sadness, anger, determination, and thankfulness that I made it out of there alive. There are family members unaccounted for--people who tried to tough it out at home. No ****ing way I was going to do that. I didn't want to be down there to begin with, but I knew my building was designed to withstand that kind of beating. Broken glass and water damage mostly. And the ****ing mold is starting to grow.

    Four days of extreme boredom punctuated by extreme anxiety bordering on panic. I need a drink and cool sheets. I need to know my cousins are safe. I'd like my mom to know I made it out of there.

    Tomorrow will be better. It has to be.

    Thanks, everybody. You wouldn't believe how much I looked forward to getting online. It's nice to read the kind words. It really is.

    Me and S------ better get our ****ing tribute show. *******s.[/I]

  8. #8
    I've actually found it embarrassing... when the tragedies were outside their windows, and they affected the media and their daily lives directly (9/11, or the Cali Quake), the tone of the reporting was much more somber, more of a tone of a national tragedy.

    But because it's happened to the poor black folk and white trash of the south, the reporting definetely has a different tone to it, you are absolutely right.

    It's embarrassing actually... this tragedy might actually be larger than either of those and yet the tone is not the same.

  9. #9
    I'm still not seeing it. The only people I see smiling and laughing are the looters who are strolling out of stores with their booty, and the people mugging for the camera while holding Help signs.

    It's not as somber as 911 coverage, but I think FNC is doing a good job covering this story under terrible conditions.

  10. #10
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    [QUOTE=sackdance]Hellish.

    First hand account via email, from a friend:

    [I]I'm out of New Orleans.

    I made it to Baton Rouge in my car with my backup tapes, my most important instruments (three of my Steinbergers, my favorite acoustic, and my rack), my laptops, my diplomas, and about 5 day's worth of clothes. It seems this is all I own now. I live nine blocks from Lake Pontchartrain, and the wind was blowing from the north. My neighborhood has 9 feet of water. I live on the second floor, but I'm not certain my building even stands. Many don't.

    My parents and grandparents lost their houses. Well, the structures still stand, but the water level is halfway up the rooftops of the houses in their neighborhoods.

    When I left the city, things were rapidly deteriorating. I drove through a flash point in front of the convention center on the way the hell out of Dodge. They were shooting at helicopters, fireman, policemen, buildings, each other. All of the stores have been looted. Pawn shops and Wal-Marts were emptied of guns, and the mother****ers were interested in shooting.

    It's far, far worse than you can imagine--worse than it looks on TV. I got my first glimpse of the news a little while ago right after I had my first shower since Saturday evening. (By the way --, I used the Roquefort-smelling nutsack comparison to many laughs this morning. Thanks for letting me borrow your material.)

    I don't know where to start. I've seen so many things that I care not see again. I didn't break down until I checked my email a little while ago. Thank you all for the kind words and the support. The past couple of days have been about survival for most of the people in the city. And the death. I don't know what the **** people are talking about when they say numbers so low. I've heard from NOPD and NOFD that many people died in their attics of asphyxiation, heat, or drowning. Houses where known deaths occurred were marked; they're interested in survivors right now. There have been hundreds of deaths in New Orleans alone. There are bodies floating in neighborhoods. Police officers are leaving them in the water for now. People are being plucked from rooftops. Children's Hospital is under siege. There was a fire in a looted building on Canal Street--the city center.

    And ignorant *******s are out of their ****ing minds. They alone will be responsible for more deaths because they're interfering with search and rescue operations. You probably won't see that **** on CNN.

    I vacillate between sadness, anger, determination, and thankfulness that I made it out of there alive. There are family members unaccounted for--people who tried to tough it out at home. No ****ing way I was going to do that. I didn't want to be down there to begin with, but I knew my building was designed to withstand that kind of beating. Broken glass and water damage mostly. And the ****ing mold is starting to grow.

    Four days of extreme boredom punctuated by extreme anxiety bordering on panic. I need a drink and cool sheets. I need to know my cousins are safe. I'd like my mom to know I made it out of there.

    Tomorrow will be better. It has to be.

    Thanks, everybody. You wouldn't believe how much I looked forward to getting online. It's nice to read the kind words. It really is.

    Me and S------ better get our ****ing tribute show. *******s.[/I][/QUOTE]

    wow...I'm glad your friend made it out.
    These people's lives will be changed forever, some say 9/11 is a bad analogy however it is still something that will cause them to look at life very differently. Attack from terrorists, or attack from mother nature, it's still an attack for the folks on the front line.

  11. #11
    Am I the only one that wants these pricks who are firing at rescue workers and relief efforts shot dead.

    These people are scum, and I think the military should have a shoot to kill order against anyone who interferes with relief efforts.

    Get the freaking regular army in there, and get them in there quick. 5000 troops should secure the city.

  12. #12
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    The way I see it watching CNN this morning, the problem is they are justifying the behavior of these people because they are "poor, paniced, etc"

    This Soledad O'Brien on CNN should be shot- she is a disgrace. Rather then helping out all this coverage is just going to do is infalme people...she just said, "the coordination in the tsunami was better then the coordination of this hurricane"....

  13. #13
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    It used to be that reporters at least tried to be dispassionate; now they feel free to inject their own feelings and drama. They're not supposed to be entertainers. :rolleyes:

  14. #14
    warfish you know what they say

    if it bleeds, it leads

  15. #15

    I agree

    I agree with you.! Did you check Shepard Smith (or whatever his name is) start taking ghetto to some of the black people there? He goes to one guy asking if he is AW-ite.


    [QUOTE=Warfish]I only have one very simple question....

    Has anyone else found the wall-to-wall coverage, and over-the-top "reporting" on the scene by the Major MEdia networks (CNN, ABC, NBC< FOX, etc.) to be.....well, to be a little ghoulish.

    For example, I;ve been watching FoxNews Channel today, and I can't tell you how many times I've heard, in a tone that sounds serious but has a hint, just a hint, of excitement behind it (as if they feel they are a part of history and how lucky they are to be the one reporting it), saying such things as "New Orleans in now a Dead City, a contaminated City filled with human waste.....and bodies....yet to be recovered. Thousands are now feared Dead.".

    Yes, I want this to be covered, but the ghoulish, almost happy-to-be-the-reporter tone of the coverage today has really seemed disturbing after a while.

    Is it just me?[/QUOTE]

  16. #16
    When a mandatory evac order is issued, they should send the nat'l guard or military in to remove these people who disobey the evac order.

    Now what's left are looters and helpless people. I find it interesting that the lead question last night to all the survivors was "why didnt you leave when they told you to?"

  17. #17
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    here is a reason to be upset with the media....


    Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005 11:58 a.m. EDT
    Gov. Haley Barbour Urged to Blame Bush

    The media continues search for ways to pin the blame for Hurricane Katrina's devastation on President Bush, with television anchors now getting into the act.

    Appearing Thursday on CNN's "American Morning," Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour was aggressively grilled over whether the "federal government" [i.e., the Bush administration] "dropped the ball" on disaster preparation efforts.

    "We knew it was a strong storm developing for several days before it ever made landfall," AM host Miles O'Brien told Barbour, before asking, "Do you have the sense that the federal government has dropped the ball here, sir?"
    Barbour rebuffed O'Brien's attempt to get him to play the blame game, insisting that he had his facts wrong.

    "I think it's very unfair for the federal government, for you to say we knew this was a great powerful storm," Barbour said. "This was a category 1 hurricane when it hit Florida. Now that's the truth."

    Instead of agreeing to disagree, O'Brien insisted it was Barbour who had his facts wrong.

    "Governor, it was a category 5 storm," he declared. "No, no, Governor Barbour ... surely there was enough knowledge in advance that this was a huge killer storm a matter of days, not hours, before it ever struck landfall. And it seems to me the military" could have done more."

    Still, the Mississippi Republican refused to be steamrolled, challenging the CNN host: "Now, Miles, if this is an interview or an argument, I don't care. But if you want to let me tell you what I think, I will."

    With that, O'Brien relented and let Barbour have his say.

    "I'm not going to agree [that the federal government dropped the ball] because I don't believe it's true," he told CNN. "The federal government came in here from the first minute - in fact, in advance. They have been tremendously helpful."

    Here's the full exchange between O'Brien and Barbour:

    O'Brien: The governor of Mississippi is Haley Barbour. He joins us now live. Governor Barbour, good to have you with us. Bring us up to date on the numbers. First of all, those numbers I just gave, are they accurate to the moment?

    Barbour: Well, they're credible, Miles. They're certainly not official, but it's because the government has a policy of not counting fatalities until they've been certified by the coroner. But those numbers are credible, and we worry that they may go up some.

    O'Brien: And when you say, "They may go up some," you've obviously been down there. I've been down there. I've seen the extent of the wreckage. I get the sense that they may go up quite a bit. What are you hearing about people who have missing loved ones or friends?

    Barbour: Well, you have been down there, and between the coast and the railroad for an area of probably about 50 miles, there's total devastation. I mean, there's virtually nothing standing. Homes that are just totally obliterated. And going through that debris, some of which is waist deep or as tall as a man, going through that takes time. We've rescued a lot of people, and we've found a lot of people. But under all of that debris, it's realistic to believe there's going to be more people.

    O'Brien: Let's talk about the response and what was put into position in advance of this storm. We knew about Katrina. We knew it was a strong storm developing for several days before it ever made landfall. Do you have the sense - because it's quite clear that state and local officials cannot handle this on their own. This is too overwhelming. Do you have the sense that the federal government has dropped the ball here, sir?

    Barbour: I really don't. And I think it's very unfair for the federal government, for you to say we knew this was a great powerful storm. This was a category 1 hurricane when it hit Florida. Now that's the truth.

    O'Brien: Governor, it was a category 5 storm.

    Barbour: The federal government ...

    O'Brien: A category 5 storm when it was ...

    Barbour: No, it was a category 1 - it was a category 1 storm when it hit Florida. It was a category 5 storm a few hours before it came ashore.

    O'Brien: No, no, Governor Barbour...

    Barbour: The federal government has been a tremendous partner in this. They have helped ...

    O'Brien: Governor Barbour, surely there was enough knowledge in advance that this was a huge killer storm a matter of days, not hours, before it ever struck landfall. And it seems to me the military ...

    Barbour: Now, Miles, if this is an interview or an argument, I don't care. But if you want to let me tell you what I think, I will.

    O'Brien: OK, go ahead.

    Barbour: And what I think is this storm strengthened in the Gulf. We begged the people to leave, and thousands of people left. Thousands of people left New Orleans. The federal government came in here from the first minute - in fact, in advance. They have been tremendously helpful, whether it's the Coast Guard, the Corps of Engineers, FEMA.

    O'Brien: But ...

    Barbour: I don't think it's at all fair ...

    O'Brien: But ...

    Barbour: ... and I'm not going to agree to that, because I don't believe it's true.

    O'Brien: But conspicuously absent from that short list you just gave us was the military, the Pentagon. This is a type of situation that cries out for the kind of support, the kind of logistics, the kind of coordination the military is ideally suited for. Why weren't more military assets prepositioned and ready for the possibility here?

    Barbour: We prepositioned more than 1,000 National Guard, 175 on the coastal counties, 1,000 more 60 miles inland, so that they wouldn't be swept away in the storm. And as soon as it became clear where the storm was going to hit, even Alabama had sent us National Guard. Pennsylvania has offered us and is sending us 2,500 National Guard.

    O'Brien: But ...

    Barbour: Would I have liked to have had 5,000 National Guard on the ground on Tuesday morning? Yes, that's not - other states are not going to give up their National Guard until they see what's happening to them. I don't blame them.

    O'Brien: But I'm talking about assets, like, you know, amphibious vehicles that the Navy has. It has helicopter support, hospital support, the ability to generate power, that sort of thing. We haven't seen that kind of thing, the kind of thing we saw, incidentally, in the wake of the tsunami.

    Barbour: Well, I'm not going to be critical of what the federal government has done. We're very grateful for it. You know, it's easy to go back and pick the bones, but we feel like they have tried very hard.

    This is the worst natural disaster that's ever struck the United States. Everybody down here is trying hard. Everybody is tired and fractious. So, I don't want to argue with you about it. But a lot of people from all over the country are helping us, and we really appreciate them, because we're making progress. And we're going to recover from what has been a grievous blow to our state, not just the coast. And we're going to rebuild, and it's going to be bigger and better than ever. But we're not going to do it by nitpicking.

    O'Brien: Governor Haley Barbour, Mississippi. Thank you for your time, sir.

    Barbour: Thank you, Miles.

  18. #18
    It's clearly Bush's fault. The man goes to church and has a direct line to God.
    This was an Act of God.
    What did Bush know and when did he know it.

  19. #19
    you guys are all "oh woe is me" but remember with great power comes great responsibility.

    Note I am not saying Katrina was in any way the fault of Bush.

    What I am saying is that sometimes effed up things will happen and people automatically blame whoever is in charge. In this case, GOP and Bush are in charge of everything for ill or for good.

    No it's not fair but that's the way it is. If Kerry was in charge it would be the same BS directed at him. The President is not above baseless criticism just because you like him/hate him. That's why it's such a tough job. The irrational hopes/fears of an entire country come to rest at the President's feet every day. Sometimes he can step over the mess and sometimes he's plunked right in it, whether he wants to be or not.

    Or to put it another way, you wanted control of the government, well be careful what you wish for. Being blamed for s--t that is out of your control should be part of the presidential job description by now.

    It's not all bad - sometimes Presidents (like Clinton with the dot.com bubble and Bush with the real estate bubble) get to take credit for s--t they had nothing to do with. This is the other side of that coin.

  20. #20
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    Bit, my post is in response to Warfish's original thought that the TV talking heads are overly dramatic, and facts don't always play a role...the politics of where that discussion went, well that's something else entirely, but not entirely surprising.

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