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Thread: Friedman sums it up!

  1. #1
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    Friedman sums it up!

    September 7, 2005
    Osama and Katrina
    By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
    On the day after 9/11, I was in Jerusalem and was interviewed by Israeli TV. The reporter asked me, "Do you think the Bush administration is up to responding to this attack?" As best I can recall, I answered: "Absolutely. One thing I can assure you about these guys is that they know how to pull the trigger."

    It was just a gut reaction that George Bush and Dick Cheney were the right guys to deal with Osama. I was not alone in that feeling, and as a result, Mr. Bush got a mandate, almost a blank check, to rule from 9/11 that he never really earned at the polls. Unfortunately, he used that mandate not simply to confront the terrorists but to take a radically uncompassionate conservative agenda - on taxes, stem cells, the environment and foreign treaties - that was going nowhere before 9/11, and drive it into a post-9/11 world. In that sense, 9/11 distorted our politics and society.

    Well, if 9/11 is one bookend of the Bush administration, Katrina may be the other. If 9/11 put the wind at President Bush's back, Katrina's put the wind in his face. If the Bush-Cheney team seemed to be the right guys to deal with Osama, they seem exactly the wrong guys to deal with Katrina - and all the rot and misplaced priorities it's exposed here at home.

    These are people so much better at inflicting pain than feeling it, so much better at taking things apart than putting them together, so much better at defending "intelligent design" as a theology than practicing it as a policy.

    For instance, it's unavoidably obvious that we need a real policy of energy conservation. But President Bush can barely choke out the word "conservation." And can you imagine Mr. Cheney, who has already denounced conservation as a "personal virtue" irrelevant to national policy, now leading such a campaign or confronting oil companies for price gouging?

    And then there are the president's standard lines: "It's not the government's money; it's your money," and, "One of the last things that we need to do to this economy is to take money out of your pocket and fuel government." Maybe Mr. Bush will now also tell us: "It's not the government's hurricane - it's your hurricane."

    An administration whose tax policy has been dominated by the toweringly selfish Grover Norquist - who has been quoted as saying: "I don't want to abolish government. I simply want to reduce it to the size where I can drag it into the bathroom and drown it in the bathtub" - doesn't have the instincts for this moment. Mr. Norquist is the only person about whom I would say this: I hope he owns property around the New Orleans levee that was never properly finished because of a lack of tax dollars. I hope his basement got flooded. And I hope that he was busy drowning government in his bathtub when the levee broke and that he had to wait for a U.S. Army helicopter to get out of town.

    The Bush team has engaged in a tax giveaway since 9/11 that has had one underlying assumption: There will never be another rainy day. Just spend money. You knew that sooner or later there would be a rainy day, but Karl Rove has assumed it wouldn't happen on Mr. Bush's watch - that someone else would have to clean it up. Well, it did happen on his watch.

    Besides ripping away the roofs of New Orleans, Katrina ripped away the argument that we can cut taxes, properly educate our kids, compete with India and China, succeed in Iraq, keep improving the U.S. infrastructure, and take care of a catastrophic emergency - without putting ourselves totally into the debt of Beijing.

    So many of the things the Bush team has ignored or distorted under the guise of fighting Osama were exposed by Katrina: its refusal to impose a gasoline tax after 9/11, which would have begun to shift our economy much sooner to more fuel-efficient cars, helped raise money for a rainy day and eased our dependence on the world's worst regimes for energy; its refusal to develop some form of national health care to cover the 40 million uninsured; and its insistence on cutting more taxes, even when that has contributed to incomplete levees and too small an Army to deal with Katrina, Osama and Saddam at the same time.

    As my Democratic entrepreneur friend Joel Hyatt once remarked, the Bush team's philosophy since 9/11 has been: "We're at war. Let's party."

    Well, the party is over. If Mr. Bush learns the lessons of Katrina, he has a chance to replace his 9/11 mandate with something new and relevant. If that happens, Katrina will have destroyed New Orleans, but helped to restore America. If Mr. Bush goes back to his politics as usual, he'll be thwarted at every turn. Katrina will have destroyed a city and a presidency.


    I thought this was a valid assessment of the political landscape, Considering Friedman is a moderate liberal yet a well repected writer does anyone have any thoughts about this article,

    I specifically agreed with his points concerning tax breaks and the problems with Katrina, education etc...

    As far as I am concerned the Bush tax breaks are one of the few domestic agenda he has accomplished since taking office, His social security plan, oh whoops that is pretty much dead in the water.
    Any thoughts on the article.

  2. #2
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    [QUOTE=glennobr]its refusal to impose a gasoline tax after 9/11, which would have begun to shift our economy much sooner to more fuel-efficient cars, helped raise money for a rainy day and eased our dependence on the world's worst regimes for energy;[/quote]
    Let me guess, he wrote an article calling for a gas tax after 9/11 and [I]just can't let go.[/I] Horrible idea and gas prices themselves will naturally spur what he'd tinker with. As a matter of fact, we need cheap energy in times of economic crisis and we were in an economic crisis on 9/11.

    [quote=glennobr]As my Democratic entrepreneur friend Joel Hyatt once remarked, the Bush team's philosophy since 9/11 has been: [B]"We're at war. Let's party."[/B] [/quote]
    Friedman/Hyatt must do better than this. I know I could and I support him.

    [quote=glennobr]Katrina will have destroyed a city and a presidency. [/quote]
    A city, possibly - a presidency, no. In fact, think how effective the left's attacks might be now if a) they had anything on Bush, or a better alternative (Is there a grade lower than "F" we could throw at the Democratic city-state NOLA, their naked and undeniable incompetence was disastrous) and b) the anti-Bush set has (forgive the phrase) had hyperbole turned up to "11" nonstop for so long we can't tell differing volumes from when a hurricane kills ten thousand people and destroys a major city from when a mother with absolute moral authority camps in Crawford, TX and demands the right to show up the Prez. And the month before that it was high crimes and treason within the Bush cabinet. The noise level and language used has been a constant (headache). Friedman and his buddies lost traction through hypersensitivity, arrogance, and selective outrage a long time ago.

    [quote=glennobr]Considering Friedman is a moderate liberal yet a well repected writer does anyone have any thoughts about this article, [/quote]
    Well, Babs is a fan.

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    Interesting he talks about "misplaced priorities" yet no one on the MSM is taking mayor Nagin to task for not evacuating people because he was afraid of being sued...something I posted yesterday...

    [url]http://www.jetsinsider.net/forums/showthread.php?t=98642[/url]

    Friedman oughta go back and look at the past ten years when it comes to an energy policy in this nation- Bush is the only one to put a comphrehensive plan on the table- it was the rats who, as usual, were the obstructionists (oh yeh, the policy calls for more nuclear power plants- but as many may remember from the late 70's and early 80's- all those intelligent "no-nukes" celebs, springsteen, jacka$s browne, jane fonda- we can't have nuclear power plants because they'll cause a national tragedy anyday now)

    The rest is just ignorant anti-Bush rhetoric..the best example right here:

    [QUOTE]Besides ripping away the roofs of New Orleans, Katrina ripped away the argument that we can cut taxes, properly educate our kids, compete with India and China, succeed in Iraq, keep improving the U.S. infrastructure, and take care of a catastrophic emergency - without putting ourselves totally into the debt of Beijing.[/QUOTE]

    Friedman sounds like one of those guys who should sit home all day for fear he may be hit by a car if he goes outside.....

    As far as price gouging...I hate to bring out the obvious; gasoline/oil/etc is a supply and demand product....why not put a lid on housing prices?? How out of sight have they gone?? As well as a million other products....I wonder what kind of car Friedman drives or what type of energy conversation he partakes in....

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    [QUOTE=sackdance]
    A city, possibly - a presidency, no. In fact, think how effective the left's attacks might be now if a) they had anything on Bush, or a better alternative (Is there a grade lower than "F" we could throw at the Democratic city-state NOLA, their naked and undeniable incompetence was disastrous) and b) the anti-Bush set has (forgive the phrase) had hyperbole turned up to "11" nonstop for so long we can't tell differing volumes from when a hurricane kills ten thousand people and destroys a major city from when a mother with absolute moral authority camps in Crawford, TX and demands the right to show up the Prez. And the month before that it was high crimes and treason within the Bush cabinet. The noise level and language used has been a constant (headache). Friedman and his buddies lost traction through hypersensitivity, arrogance, and selective outrage a long time ago.
    [/QUOTE]


    This paragraph gave me an intellectual/idealogical woodie. Nice. :cool:

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