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Thread: look at what outsiders,think of some of you fans

  1. #1
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    look at what outsiders,think of some of you fans

    Updated: Jan. 3, 2006, 2:29 PM ET
    If Kansas City calls, Herm should answerBy Adrian Wojnarowski
    Special to ESPN.com
    Archive

    They've been dancing this dance for months, stealing glances and fluttering eyelashes from halfway across the country. Herm Edwards has gone back and forth in public about his desire to make a run for the Kansas City Chiefs coaching job, but he ought to do himself and his career a favor and go balls-out after it.

    It won't be long until Chiefs general manager Carl Peterson asks the Jets for permission to negotiate with Edwards, banking on close relationships with Jets general manager Terry Bradway and Edwards to make a rare NFL coaching transaction happen. Edwards shouldn't think twice. Five years with the Jets, three playoff appearances and two postseason victories later, his run is over with a broken-down old team.



    Rex Brown/WireImage.com
    Herman Edwards has done a lot for the Jets, but with a rebuilding job looming, it might be the right time to depart.He wanted a contract extension to allow him a chance to be part of the rebuilding process, but that's a waste of his time and energy. Unless he were rebuilding off a Super Bowl champion, there would be no public patience with this forlorn franchise. The Jets have a frustrated, ne'er-do-well fan base, desperate to win and win now. Edwards ought to run out of there, and never, ever turn back.

    In Kansas City, there's a team that's better, younger and more talented than the Jets. Dick Vermeil has left his program in good shape, left it in the hands of a good GM in Peterson. Trent Green and Larry Johnson are a profoundly more appealing backfield than what's left of Chad Pennington and Curtis Martin. The Jets are the home office for bizarre departures, beginning with Bill Parcells and Al Groh and immortalized by Bill Belichick.

    The Jets lose coaches the way kids lose balloons at the state fair. They just fly away. Edwards used a Jets news conference several weeks ago to throw out the possibility of pursuing the Chiefs vacancy, suggesting that perhaps he wouldn't be wanted with the Jets. He was angling for a contract extension, believing he's underpaid with two years left at $2 million apiece.

    Sometimes, I'd love to see Edwards take a major college job. I could see him thriving in a cool Pac-10 job. He has so much Pete Carroll in him, another ex-Jets coach who swears now that New York didn't get him, nor did he get it. Yet Edwards brings a different perspective to the NFL, different sensibilities.

    Peter Roby of the Center for the Study of Sports in Society had been talking to me about the courage it took for the Jets' Laveranues Coles to tell the story of a childhood scarred by sexual molestation. In the machismo-suffused locker room culture of the NFL, this was the kind of honesty that is rare, but Roby found it no accident that Cole's confession had come under Edwards' watch.

    As Roby discovered, this was a different football coach for modern times, with different values, a leader who had invited Roby and his staff into the Jets facility to address his players about all matters of abuse that long have been synonymous with the violent football culture.

    "From what I've seen, Herm Edwards is trying to develop people, and not just win football games," Roby said. "He's trying to perpetuate a different stereotype, a caring citizen who can also be a really good football player who wins games.

    "People in New York should know what they've got in him."

    Edwards should take the money and run, leaving the Jets with Kansas City draft picks. Why would they want a guy who doesn't want to be there, anyway? A lot of fans and a lot of talk radio voices have dispatched an uncommon viciousness his way, and after this 4-12 season and what awaits next year, it's hard to believe he would survive 2006 as Jets coach.

    This is a broken-down team, a coach killer in a profession that's about staying one step ahead of the posse. Edwards owes no loyalty to the Jets. He isn't a college coach responsible for honoring his promise to recruits, but something rare on the coaching market in this offseason: a head coach with a winning playoff pedigree.

    Of course, this isn't college football, where Edwards' exemplary graduation rates and a clean program can win him favor in a lost season.

    Edwards is a rah-rah college coach in a cynical pro market. He's entertaining, but that never has been a fit in New York. When he's gone, the Jets will miss him. They're destined for a spiral, one Edwards could sidestep if he's smart here.

    And when he goes, bringing to an end the tenure of the most successful Jets playoff coach ever, you wonder whether people will ever stop to consider what Roby, the sports sociologist, had to say about the coach of the Jets. Perhaps by then, they'll all know what they had in Herm Edwards.

    Adrian Wojnarowski is a sports columnist for The Record (N.J.) and a regular contributor to ESPN.com. He can be reached at ESPNWoj10@aol.com. His new book, The Miracle Of St. Anthony: A Season with Coach Bob Hurley And Basketball's Most Improbable Dynasty, is available nationwide.




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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by batman
    Updated: Jan. 3, 2006, 2:29 PM ET
    If Kansas City calls, Herm should answerBy Adrian Wojnarowski
    Special to ESPN.com
    Archive

    They've been dancing this dance for months, stealing glances and fluttering eyelashes from halfway across the country. Herm Edwards has gone back and forth in public about his desire to make a run for the Kansas City Chiefs coaching job, but he ought to do himself and his career a favor and go balls-out after it.

    It won't be long until Chiefs general manager Carl Peterson asks the Jets for permission to negotiate with Edwards, banking on close relationships with Jets general manager Terry Bradway and Edwards to make a rare NFL coaching transaction happen. Edwards shouldn't think twice. Five years with the Jets, three playoff appearances and two postseason victories later, his run is over with a broken-down old team.



    Rex Brown/WireImage.com
    Herman Edwards has done a lot for the Jets, but with a rebuilding job looming, it might be the right time to depart.He wanted a contract extension to allow him a chance to be part of the rebuilding process, but that's a waste of his time and energy. Unless he were rebuilding off a Super Bowl champion, there would be no public patience with this forlorn franchise. The Jets have a frustrated, ne'er-do-well fan base, desperate to win and win now. Edwards ought to run out of there, and never, ever turn back.

    In Kansas City, there's a team that's better, younger and more talented than the Jets. Dick Vermeil has left his program in good shape, left it in the hands of a good GM in Peterson. Trent Green and Larry Johnson are a profoundly more appealing backfield than what's left of Chad Pennington and Curtis Martin. The Jets are the home office for bizarre departures, beginning with Bill Parcells and Al Groh and immortalized by Bill Belichick.

    The Jets lose coaches the way kids lose balloons at the state fair. They just fly away. Edwards used a Jets news conference several weeks ago to throw out the possibility of pursuing the Chiefs vacancy, suggesting that perhaps he wouldn't be wanted with the Jets. He was angling for a contract extension, believing he's underpaid with two years left at $2 million apiece.

    Sometimes, I'd love to see Edwards take a major college job. I could see him thriving in a cool Pac-10 job. He has so much Pete Carroll in him, another ex-Jets coach who swears now that New York didn't get him, nor did he get it. Yet Edwards brings a different perspective to the NFL, different sensibilities.

    Peter Roby of the Center for the Study of Sports in Society had been talking to me about the courage it took for the Jets' Laveranues Coles to tell the story of a childhood scarred by sexual molestation. In the machismo-suffused locker room culture of the NFL, this was the kind of honesty that is rare, but Roby found it no accident that Cole's confession had come under Edwards' watch.

    As Roby discovered, this was a different football coach for modern times, with different values, a leader who had invited Roby and his staff into the Jets facility to address his players about all matters of abuse that long have been synonymous with the violent football culture.

    "From what I've seen, Herm Edwards is trying to develop people, and not just win football games," Roby said. "He's trying to perpetuate a different stereotype, a caring citizen who can also be a really good football player who wins games.

    "People in New York should know what they've got in him."

    Edwards should take the money and run, leaving the Jets with Kansas City draft picks. Why would they want a guy who doesn't want to be there, anyway? A lot of fans and a lot of talk radio voices have dispatched an uncommon viciousness his way, and after this 4-12 season and what awaits next year, it's hard to believe he would survive 2006 as Jets coach.

    This is a broken-down team, a coach killer in a profession that's about staying one step ahead of the posse. Edwards owes no loyalty to the Jets. He isn't a college coach responsible for honoring his promise to recruits, but something rare on the coaching market in this offseason: a head coach with a winning playoff pedigree.

    Of course, this isn't college football, where Edwards' exemplary graduation rates and a clean program can win him favor in a lost season.

    Edwards is a rah-rah college coach in a cynical pro market. He's entertaining, but that never has been a fit in New York. When he's gone, the Jets will miss him. They're destined for a spiral, one Edwards could sidestep if he's smart here.

    And when he goes, bringing to an end the tenure of the most successful Jets playoff coach ever, you wonder whether people will ever stop to consider what Roby, the sports sociologist, had to say about the coach of the Jets. Perhaps by then, they'll all know what they had in Herm Edwards.

    Adrian Wojnarowski is a sports columnist for The Record (N.J.) and a regular contributor to ESPN.com. He can be reached at ESPNWoj10@aol.com. His new book, The Miracle Of St. Anthony: A Season with Coach Bob Hurley And Basketball's Most Improbable Dynasty, is available nationwide.




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    Do you think I give a rats *** what other people think?

    The fact remains,

    He can not manage the clock to save his life. There is no excuse for that. For this reason alone, he should leave.. it drives me up a wall literally.

    remember when he hired a clock management coach,,, and the management of the clock was Still horrable.. remember the SD game?????

    IMO the Players are not responding any longer.

    He has no balls to make tough decisions... too conservitive

  3. #3
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    remember the SD game?????
    I remember that game, the game at home vs baltimore in 04, the monday nighter against tennessee when he didnt relaize he could sit on the ball instead of running the ball to kill the 4th quarter (this is the same guy who recovered a fumble for a td and a win in giants stadium because of another coach's inability to tell time), i remember the kneel against pitt in the playoffs, etc, etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SINYJets
    I remember that game, the game at home vs baltimore in 04, the monday nighter against tennessee when he didnt relaize he could sit on the ball instead of running the ball to kill the 4th quarter (this is the same guy who recovered a fumble for a td and a win in giants stadium because of another coach's inability to tell time), i remember the kneel against pitt in the playoffs, etc, etc.

    There is no worse feeling as a football fan than Mismanagement of the clock.. and the Head coach is 100% to blame when it comes to that.

    I need to know though

    HOW DO YOU HIRE A CLOCK MANAGEMENT COACH AND STILL MESS IT UP????????

    HOW?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by LETSGOJETS
    There is no worse feeling as a football fan than Mismanagement of the clock.. and the Head coach is 100% to blame when it comes to that.

    I need to know though

    HOW DO YOU HIRE A CLOCK MANAGEMENT COACH AND STILL MESS IT UP????????

    HOW?
    AMEN!

  6. #6
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    this one falls under the "I could give two $hits WHAT they think" category

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    i agree.

    who gives a rat's *** what people who dont follow this team day in and day out have to say about it?

    we've witnessed herm's strengths and we've seen his weaknesses every day. we're seen the practices, we've watched the games, we've heard the press conferences, we've read the reports.

    whether or not you love the guy or hate him- after 5 years you've EARNED that right to have those feelings about the guy.

    personally, i'm not going to be sad to see him go. was he the head coach for a a particularly good period of jets football? yes.. is he a good gameday coach? no. can he motivate guys and give firey speeches? sure.. is he stubborn at times with loyality, which has hurt the team? definitely.

    my only wish is we get FAIR market value for this guy. let's not get swindled again. if bellichek was equal to a 1st in 2000, so is Herm. that should be the STARTING point for negotiations.

  8. #8
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    Well it seems like the author here is saying what a good man Herm is and how he cares about his players. Well that's all said and good but this is a business not a school. He is hired to put the best product on the field and have them win. Is he the best man to do that? Does his record show that he knows how to win the big ones?

    I'm sorry but I don't think it has and for that reason the Jets are better off if he goes. Especially if he doesn't want to be here any more.

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    WGAF



    I'll let you figure it out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Queens Jet Fan
    Well it seems like the author here is saying what a good man Herm is and how he cares about his players. Well that's all said and good but this is a business not a school. He is hired to put the best product on the field and have them win. Is he the best man to do that? Does his record show that he knows how to win the big ones?

    I'm sorry but I don't think it has and for that reason the Jets are better off if he goes. Especially if he doesn't want to be here any more.
    I couldn't agree more. It's great that Herm is a nice a guy and is loved and respected by his players but if that doesn't translate into wins it is meaningless.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Queens Jet Fan
    Well it seems like the author here is saying what a good man Herm is and how he cares about his players. Well that's all said and good but this is a business not a school. He is hired to put the best product on the field and have them win. Is he the best man to do that? Does his record show that he knows how to win the big ones?

    I'm sorry but I don't think it has and for that reason the Jets are better off if he goes. Especially if he doesn't want to be here any more.

    exactly.. herm was not hired to run a 'good citizen' program.. so cut me the slack..

    the bottom line are results. is herm edwards a guy who can win a super bowl?

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by LETSGOJETS
    Do you think I give a rats *** what other people think?

    The fact remains,

    He can not manage the clock to save his life. There is no excuse for that. For this reason alone, he should leave.. it drives me up a wall literally.

    remember when he hired a clock management coach,,, and the management of the clock was Still horrable.. remember the SD game?????

    IMO the Players are not responding any longer.

    He has no balls to make tough decisions... too conservitive
    exactly! this isn't a pete carroll situation where the man got no shot. problem is herm is a nice guy, so people like him - divorce yourself from that kind of thinking - it should have little to do with who is your head coach. In my opinion, herm is not head coach material - great motivator, obviously has a connection with the players, but there are times i am shocked by his inability to make the right decision on gameday - I know less about football than some on this board (e.g., i think never having played organized football puts me at a disadvantage to know the true heart of the game, playcallung, defensive-scheme, etc) - yet i sit in the stadium shaking my head in disbelief. for me though the last straw is his BS jackie-childs press conferences - just admit you f'd up instead of giving me your bullsh!t. how about the miami game - 1st and 5 from the 14 yard line and 4 shots at the endzone? how about trying for the first down there! and don;t give me that sh!t about heimer calling the plays - herm can veto it - or make a suggestion - i just think he likes other people falling on his sword for him and likes some plausible deniability - that way he can say "we ran the play that was called - and just didn;t execute".

    what is his job? he doesn't keep the clock, he doesn't call the plays - his only job is to make 2 or 3 split-second decisions a game - go for it, don;t go for it - hemier lets get a first down and then worry about the endzone - lets call a timeout, whatever - a few decisions - that's it - and historically a lot of them have been not only wroing, but made poor football sense. the grass is always greener - KC and the rest of the sh!t-kickers down there can take their opinions about us and shove them

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    "Sometimes, I'd love to see Edwards take a major college job. I could see him thriving in a cool Pac-10 job. He has so much Pete Carroll in him, another ex-Jets coach who swears now that New York didn't get him, nor did he get it. Yet Edwards brings a different perspective to the NFL, different sensibilities. "


    This is something I've actually always thought (Herm would be a good college coach). In college, you need simple blind faith. Herm gets that, no doubt. But on this level you need to know how to strategize. He simple doesn't have the goods.

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    "read my lips...I don't give a rat's behind"

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    Are these guys Jet fans? Don't think so.

    Their remarks hold no value with me. I would more value what you as a Jet fan has to say if in fact you are a Jet fan.

  16. #16
    Once again.... ESPN going down on Herm b/c he is marketbale!

    Does anyone out there really care what other fans think of us???

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by batman

    "From what I've seen, Herm Edwards is trying to develop people, and not just win football games," Roby said. "He's trying to perpetuate a different stereotype, a caring citizen who can also be a really good football player who wins games.
    This is the problem. We are dealing with adults, not kids who are growing up. Adults are paid to do their job, and not to develop themselves as adults. That's what college is for. Bottom line is I want a coach who just wants to win football games, and puts ALL his energy into that goal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LETSGOJETS
    Do you think I give a rats *** what other people think?

    The fact remains,

    He can not manage the clock to save his life. There is no excuse for that. For this reason alone, he should leave.. it drives me up a wall literally.

    remember when he hired a clock management coach,,, and the management of the clock was Still horrable.. remember the SD game?????

    IMO the Players are not responding any longer.

    He has no balls to make tough decisions... too conservitive

    And you wonder why people write the stuff that they do about us.....

  19. #19
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    Outsiders? The Outsiders can kiss the outside ring of my ****ing *** while it's still dirty and full of ****.

    So were are suppose to kiss Edwards feet because he lucked out?

    **** the outsiders.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by papichango
    Outsiders? The Outsiders can kiss the outside ring of my ****ing *** while it's still dirty and full of ****.

    So were are suppose to kiss Edwards feet because he lucked out?

    **** the outsiders.
    ditto from my above quote here as well...

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