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Thread: Interesting Op-Ed from my friend

  1. #1
    Waterboy
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    Interesting Op-Ed from my friend

    My friend wrote this for a school newspaper...I disagree, but interesting:

    As general manager of the New York Jets, you must have one goal in mind: draft Matt Leinart.
    Sell your soul. Offer Saints GM Mickey Loomis unlimited bowls of Manhattan clam chowder. Do anything and everything necessary to get in position to draft the University of Southern California wonder boy. Jet fans deserve more than another season of toiling behind Chad Pennington’s bum shoulder and Brooks Bollinger’s inability to correctly run an NFL offense.
    The Jets have the number four pick and seven of the top 117 selections in the upcoming April 29 draft. With University of Southern California running back Reggie Bush being the odds on favorite to go number one, only the Saints and the Titans stand in between the Jets and the former Heisman Trophy winner, Leinart.
    Various mock drafts have the USC quarterback landing either in New Orleans, Tennessee or New York. But Tennenbaum should leave nothing to chance and assure the Jets of the opportunity to select the surest and most accomplished quarterback in the draft.
    For over 30 years has the Jet taking snaps from center been void of the Hollywood glitz and glamour that accompanies manning the league’s most important position in the NFL’s largest market. Instead of having a Benz, the Jets have always been stuck with a Volkswagen Beetle.
    This trend has been exacerbated recently as the Jets of the late 90’s and early millennium were kept afloat by ageless Vinny Testaverde. When the mileage on Testadverde’s odometer reached its limit, Vinny passed on the reign of quarterback duty to the NFL’s biggest lemon: Chad Pennington.
    The Jets are in danger of getting left in the dust by rivals Bill Belichick of the Patriots and protégé Nick Saban of the Dolphins. While New England once again claimed victory over the AFC east, Miami surprised the league by finishing 9-7 with journeymen Gus Ferotte and Sage Rosenfels at the helm of their offense. With the addition of Daunte Culpepper to Saban’s squad along with the Patriots already having MVP candidate Tom Brady, the Jets can not afford to suffer through another season with a second string quarterback starting eight games.
    Leinart is a media darling. At 6-5, 224 pounds, he’s handsome and recognizable. At USC’s recent pro day, he surprised everyone by displaying his 37 inch vertical. He has the resume, possesses the glib and confidence required of New York and most importantly he is a winner.
    In his three years as starter after succeeding Heisman Trophy winner and eventual first overall pick Carson Palmer, Leinart’s Trojans compiled an astounding 37 wins and two losses. His teams won the national championship in the 2003 and 2004 season, and played second fiddle to Vince Young’s Houdini act in this January’s Rose Bowl. Leinart won the Heisman in 2004 by completing 65.3 percent of his passes for 3322 yards. He followed that up as a fifth year senior by actually improving on those statistics by completing 65.7 percent of his passes for 3815 yards.
    Always at the center of attention during his senior year at USC< the California kid has already embraced the history, fame and pressure that accompanies playing on the NFL’s largest stage.
    “I love New York, I’m a big fan of the city,” he said following the USC pro day on April 7. “It’s out of my hands but to have the possibility of playing for the New York Jets, it would be sweet. Broadway Joe (Namath) is the last big-time guy they’ve had on and off the field. I’m confident I could be that type of player.”
    He’s right. No other potential draftee has shown the potential to carry themselves on and off the field like Leinart has the past three years. Mel Kiper’s latest ESPN mock draft has the Jets taking mammoth right tackle D’Brickashaw Ferguson from Virginia. And while Ferguson may anchor an NFL line for the next 12 years, the Jets are looking for a luxury sedan, not a Mack truck.
    Other mock drafts have the Jets taking the longhorn QB Vince Young. Sure he possesses the athletic ability that scouts drool over. At 6-5, 230 pounds and the ability to run a 4.4 second 40 yard dash, Young’s magic act in the Rose Bowl sent his draft stock skyward. But the defenses of the NFL are bigger, faster, stronger and more importantly smarter than any defense Young has seen in his two years of starting at Texas. And after unofficially scoring a six and a “corrected” 16 on the Wonderlic test, would you want Young staring into the teeth of a Bill Belichick defense?
    Leinart on the other hand has shown no reason to think he can not handle the pressures and rigors of manning the NFL quarterback position. He’s improved statistically each year and won the Heisman in the year following offensive guru Norm Chow’s departure to the Tennessee Titans.
    The Jets will host a private workout for Leinart on April 17. If it isn’t already obvious to the Jets brass whom they should select with number four, it should be by next Monday.
    On April 29, Tennenbaum will hold the key to the Jets future. For it to be successful, all the GM has to do is push the door ajar and let Leinart walk on through.

  2. #2
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    3...2...1

    Is your friend SAR?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ikeyman3
    3...2...1

    Is your friend SAR?

    haha.. it would be selling our soul and our future to boot pick up leinart..

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by jetsboy99
    My friend wrote this for a school newspaper...I disagree, but interesting:

    As general manager of the New York Jets, you must have one goal in mind: draft Matt Leinart.
    Sell your soul. Offer Saints GM Mickey Loomis unlimited bowls of Manhattan clam chowder. Do anything and everything necessary to get in position to draft the University of Southern California wonder boy. Jet fans deserve more than another season of toiling behind Chad Pennington’s bum shoulder and Brooks Bollinger’s inability to correctly run an NFL offense.
    The Jets have the number four pick and seven of the top 117 selections in the upcoming April 29 draft. With University of Southern California running back Reggie Bush being the odds on favorite to go number one, only the Saints and the Titans stand in between the Jets and the former Heisman Trophy winner, Leinart.
    Various mock drafts have the USC quarterback landing either in New Orleans, Tennessee or New York. But Tennenbaum should leave nothing to chance and assure the Jets of the opportunity to select the surest and most accomplished quarterback in the draft.
    For over 30 years has the Jet taking snaps from center been void of the Hollywood glitz and glamour that accompanies manning the league’s most important position in the NFL’s largest market. Instead of having a Benz, the Jets have always been stuck with a Volkswagen Beetle.
    This trend has been exacerbated recently as the Jets of the late 90’s and early millennium were kept afloat by ageless Vinny Testaverde. When the mileage on Testadverde’s odometer reached its limit, Vinny passed on the reign of quarterback duty to the NFL’s biggest lemon: Chad Pennington.
    The Jets are in danger of getting left in the dust by rivals Bill Belichick of the Patriots and protégé Nick Saban of the Dolphins. While New England once again claimed victory over the AFC east, Miami surprised the league by finishing 9-7 with journeymen Gus Ferotte and Sage Rosenfels at the helm of their offense. With the addition of Daunte Culpepper to Saban’s squad along with the Patriots already having MVP candidate Tom Brady, the Jets can not afford to suffer through another season with a second string quarterback starting eight games.
    Leinart is a media darling. At 6-5, 224 pounds, he’s handsome and recognizable. At USC’s recent pro day, he surprised everyone by displaying his 37 inch vertical. He has the resume, possesses the glib and confidence required of New York and most importantly he is a winner.
    In his three years as starter after succeeding Heisman Trophy winner and eventual first overall pick Carson Palmer, Leinart’s Trojans compiled an astounding 37 wins and two losses. His teams won the national championship in the 2003 and 2004 season, and played second fiddle to Vince Young’s Houdini act in this January’s Rose Bowl. Leinart won the Heisman in 2004 by completing 65.3 percent of his passes for 3322 yards. He followed that up as a fifth year senior by actually improving on those statistics by completing 65.7 percent of his passes for 3815 yards.
    Always at the center of attention during his senior year at USC< the California kid has already embraced the history, fame and pressure that accompanies playing on the NFL’s largest stage.
    “I love New York, I’m a big fan of the city,” he said following the USC pro day on April 7. “It’s out of my hands but to have the possibility of playing for the New York Jets, it would be sweet. Broadway Joe (Namath) is the last big-time guy they’ve had on and off the field. I’m confident I could be that type of player.”
    He’s right. No other potential draftee has shown the potential to carry themselves on and off the field like Leinart has the past three years. Mel Kiper’s latest ESPN mock draft has the Jets taking mammoth right tackle D’Brickashaw Ferguson from Virginia. And while Ferguson may anchor an NFL line for the next 12 years, the Jets are looking for a luxury sedan, not a Mack truck.
    Other mock drafts have the Jets taking the longhorn QB Vince Young. Sure he possesses the athletic ability that scouts drool over. At 6-5, 230 pounds and the ability to run a 4.4 second 40 yard dash, Young’s magic act in the Rose Bowl sent his draft stock skyward. But the defenses of the NFL are bigger, faster, stronger and more importantly smarter than any defense Young has seen in his two years of starting at Texas. And after unofficially scoring a six and a “corrected” 16 on the Wonderlic test, would you want Young staring into the teeth of a Bill Belichick defense?
    Leinart on the other hand has shown no reason to think he can not handle the pressures and rigors of manning the NFL quarterback position. He’s improved statistically each year and won the Heisman in the year following offensive guru Norm Chow’s departure to the Tennessee Titans.
    The Jets will host a private workout for Leinart on April 17. If it isn’t already obvious to the Jets brass whom they should select with number four, it should be by next Monday.
    On April 29, Tennenbaum will hold the key to the Jets future. For it to be successful, all the GM has to do is push the door ajar and let Leinart walk on through.
    Your friend is an obnoxiously bad writer who depends on outrageous metaphors and facsimilies and popculture allusions rather than points to back up his thesis statement. When will he be interviewing for an ESPN.com staff position?

    Edit: I forgot to mention cliche's. Your friend uses a lot of cliche's. Seriously. Can you just buy him a ****load of red ink pens and tell him to cross all the **** I just mentioned out so he can learn how to write? Do this for him and I vow to you he will become a great writer.

  5. #5
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    I happen to like Leinart (at No. 4), but all that "media darling" crap is completely irrelevant.

    Remember the last great Hollywood college QB, Cade McNown? Dated supermodels, had the roguish good looks and all that. And he f'ing s*cked.

    This is about football. It's nice he can handle the media, but its defenses I care about.

  6. #6
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    I can understand people really liking a certain ball player (image, looks etc should mean zero) but I can't understand the out right foolish comments about selling the farm to move up a couple of spots to get Leinart. who is supposed to block for the guy, carry the ball, get the back back for him? Do people learn nothing from the Texans? Get the QB 1st then watch him get pummled for 3 years as you try and build around him.

  7. #7
    Waterboy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brain Hemorrhage
    Your friend is an obnoxiously bad writer who depends on outrageous metaphors and facsimilies and popculture allusions rather than points to back up his thesis statement. When will he be interviewing for an ESPN.com staff position?

    Edit: I forgot to mention cliche's. Your friend uses a lot of cliche's. Seriously. Can you just buy him a ****load of red ink pens and tell him to cross all the **** I just mentioned out so he can learn how to write? Do this for him and I vow to you he will become a great writer.
    I don't have any personal problem with your criticisms of my friend's writing, but I think it's fairly ungrounded. While the article does employ platitudes, they are appropriately used, and don't -- in any way -- detract from the general flow of the piece. He absolutely DOES support his thesis throughout the piece. Further, for a sports opinion piece of this nature, what kind of support other than stats and facts are useful at all?

    When calling someone an 'obnoxiously bad writer' it would behoove you to ensure your own writing is on par with conventional English. #1: It's 'cliches' not 'cliche's.' The latter suggests a possession of cliches or a plural usage...incorrect either way. #2: facsimilies. The spelling, for one, is incorrect. Assuming you meant to say 'facsimiles,' the application makes no sense anyway. These mistakes, along with countless other grammatical flaws in your writing, prove irrevocably that you are unsuited to asses anyone’s writing.

    I mean no offense, of course, and by no means do I intend to generalize you as an individual based on your brief statements. I honestly don’t doubt your ability to write or think articulately.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by jetsboy99
    I don't have any personal problem with your criticisms of my friend's writing, but I think it's fairly ungrounded. While the article does employ platitudes, they are appropriately used, and don't -- in any way -- detract from the general flow of the piece. He absolutely DOES support his thesis throughout the piece. Further, for a sports opinion piece of this nature, what kind of support other than stats and facts are useful at all?

    When calling someone an 'obnoxiously bad writer' it would behoove you to ensure your own writing is on par with conventional English. #1: It's 'cliches' not 'cliche's.' The latter suggests a possession of cliches or a plural usage...incorrect either way. #2: facsimilies. The spelling, for one, is incorrect. Assuming you meant to say 'facsimiles,' the application makes no sense anyway. These mistakes, along with countless other grammatical flaws in your writing, prove irrevocably that you are unsuited to asses anyone’s writing.

    I mean no offense, of course, and by no means do I intend to generalize you as an individual based on your brief statements. I honestly don’t doubt your ability to write or think articulately.
    Edit: I wanted to respond by private message but you disallow private messages. So here it is anyway.


    Quote Originally Posted by jetsboy99
    I don't have any personal problem with your criticisms of my friend's writing, but I think it's fairly ungrounded. While the article does employ platitudes, they are appropriately used, and don't -- in any way -- detract from the general flow of the piece. He absolutely DOES support his thesis throughout the piece. Further, for a sports opinion piece of this nature, what kind of support other than stats and facts are useful at all?

    When calling someone an 'obnoxiously bad writer' it would behoove you to ensure your own writing is on par with conventional English. #1: It's 'cliches' not 'cliche's.' The latter suggests a possession of cliches or a plural usage...incorrect either way. #2: facsimilies. The spelling, for one, is incorrect. Assuming you meant to say 'facsimiles,' the application makes no sense anyway. These mistakes, along with countless other grammatical flaws in your writing, prove irrevocably that you are unsuited to asses anyone’s writing.

    I mean no offense, of course, and by no means do I intend to generalize you as an individual based on your brief statements. I honestly don’t doubt your ability to write or think articulately.
    Two other people said your friend's supporting opinions were outright foolish. If I come across as a jerk I assure you it is because I am.

    As for grammatical errors: I am a computer programmer. I can write programs that check my spelling for me (search Google for "Levenshtein distance") and I have macros set-up in my word processor that automatically force me to check every sentence that uses the word "their," "they're," or "there". What a programmer can not do for a piece of composition, however, is say: "Get rid of these cliches, cut-out the outrageous statement that you use to make your opinion stand-out, and see what you have left at the end." Hyperbole can be good, but your friend's piece there was not journalism.

    Also, the statements "These mistakes, along with countless other grammatical flaws in your writing, prove irrevocably that you are unsuited to asses anyone’s writing." and "I honestly don’t doubt your ability to write or think articulately." do not lex. They contradict and leave your opinion of my writing undefined. Furthermore, I was assessing the *content* of your friend's piece more than grammatical usage. If anything, if you don't doubt my ability to write articulately, then I am supremely qualified to share my opinion on matters of content.

    I guess the primary difference between writing journalistic prose and message board prose is that I am not expected to have someone proof-read my prose if it's on a message board.

    By the way, I might be a jerk, but when someone does what I feel is a great job when writing, I let them know too. An example of a great sports writer in my eyes is SportsBlurb.com's John Franco, who is also a college student. He writes a weekly column titled "Statistics 101." I regularly give my feedback to Mr. Franco and tell him he's a great writer.

  9. #9
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    I love Leinart and think he's the best QB prospect in the draft, but I wouldn't trade up for him.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brain Hemorrhage
    Edit: I wanted to respond by private message but you disallow private messages. So here it is anyway.




    Two other people said your friend's supporting opinions were outright foolish. If I come across as a jerk I assure you it is because I am.

    As for grammatical errors: I am a computer programmer. I can write programs that check my spelling for me (search Google for "Levenshtein distance") and I have macros set-up in my word processor that automatically force me to check every sentence that uses the word "their," "they're," or "there". What a programmer can not do for a piece of composition, however, is say: "Get rid of these cliches, cut-out the outrageous statement that you use to make your opinion stand-out, and see what you have left at the end." Hyperbole can be good, but your friend's piece there was not journalism.

    Also, the statements "These mistakes, along with countless other grammatical flaws in your writing, prove irrevocably that you are unsuited to asses anyone’s writing." and "I honestly don’t doubt your ability to write or think articulately." do not lex. They contradict and leave your opinion of my writing undefined. Furthermore, I was assessing the *content* of your friend's piece more than grammatical usage. If anything, if you don't doubt my ability to write articulately, then I am supremely qualified to share my opinion on matters of content.

    I guess the primary difference between writing journalistic prose and message board prose is that I am not expected to have someone proof-read my prose if it's on a message board.

    By the way, I might be a jerk, but when someone does what I feel is a great job when writing, I let them know too. An example of a great sports writer in my eyes is SportsBlurb.com's John Franco, who is also a college student. He writes a weekly column titled "Statistics 101." I regularly give my feedback to Mr. Franco and tell him he's a great writer.
    Fair enough. There's no need for a 'rebuttal,' as this is just friendly chat anyway, but I'll address the issue of the seemingly contradictory statements. I meant in the SMALL context of what you had written you were unqualified; not in the LARGER general scope of what you do. IE. I didn't want to judge you based on a post on a message board as I am aware that many people (myself included) don't take the time to think these things out or proof read. My point, then, in essence, is that when making a critique about -- for one -- verbiage, etc. ensure that your own is in check. That's all.

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