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Thread: The Jets Offensive and Defensive Systems

  1. #1

    The Jets Offensive and Defensive Systems

    I know that the jets play a 3-4 defense, but can someone give me an explanation of the differences and intricacies of OUR system. Also, what kind of offensive system are we running. Is it a modified West Coast offense? I'm not sure, if someone could help me out, it would be great. thanks

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by JetsIn07 View Post
    I know that the jets play a 3-4 defense, but can someone give me an explanation of the differences and intricacies of OUR system. Also, what kind of offensive system are we running. Is it a modified West Coast offense? I'm not sure, if someone could help me out, it would be great. thanks
    OUR system doesn't work. Other teams' systems DO work.

    Our offensive system is called INEFFECTIVE.

    Seriously, here's some food for thought from another site (sports handicapping, believe it or not); obviously, the Jets will continue to adapt to a gameplan suitable for KC. Nevertheless, points are valid for the most part.

    "Offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer’s offensive design features many attributes of a West Coast attack, likely due to QB Chad Pennington’s lack of arm strength. With the addition of running back Thomas Jones, Schottenheimer has an established back who can grind out tough yards and also has big play capability. It’s a control-based plan with lots of short throws out of the backfield to Jones and Leon Washington with lots of motion and no-huddle looks and a good amount of shotgun, something that Pennington prefers.

    The Jets like to use a two-tight end approach, particularly in short yardage situations. Wide receiver Brad Smith also fills a utility roll, lining up in the slot or in the backfield, making him someone opposing defenses must account for. With his history as a QB in college, he is a great decoy when carrying out fakes and is a great trick play player -- kind of like Kordell Stewart was for the Steelers.

    Coach Eric Mangini brought along his preference for a base 3-4 scheme that mixes in 4-3 looks. Defensive coordinator Bob Sutton likes to apply pressure with the blitz and particularly likes to safety blitz with Kerry Rhodes. This has been a problematic philosophy in the past as it gives teams big play opportunities, but I don’t see Sutton soon changing his ways.

    The defense is not only assignment-based, which limit’s the inside linebacker’s freedom, but it is speed-based. Inside linebacker Jonathan Vilma and nose tackle Dewayne Robertson are both undersized for the scheme, and the defensive line lacks beef as well. I’ve always thought you should create a system to house your personnel and not the other way around, but many coordinators want nothing to do with that philosophy."

    Again, a little outdated since there have been personnel changes, but should help. Get what you want out of it.

    ADRIEN CLARKE FOR PRESIDENT

    p.s. You probably won't get a serious answer from anyone else.
    Last edited by TONY RUNO; 12-01-2007 at 05:50 PM.

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    Tony it is nice to see a serious answer .

    Jetsin07 the intricasies of our system currently don't exist. Not trying to be a smartass but when you don't have the proper personell to run the 3-4 its been proven over and over again you will fail miserably. The 3-4 is much tougher to run than the 4-3 and it takes specific personell to do it. It takes big lineman who can occupy O-Lineman so the LB's can come up and make plays. It also helps if your linebackers are on the large side also. The classic 3-4 is 3 huge lineman and a pass rushing demon for an OLB. In the mold of a LT type. In our case when we move up a LB to rush the outside edge he usually gets his face smashed in because we dont have the defensive lineman to occupy the O-Lineman.

    Shott does run some type of West Coast no huddle offense. The problem is its horribly predictable. Running a no huddle is designed to limit the opposing defenses ability to make personell changes so you basicly wear them down. Problem is we ran the no huddle and played ball control at the same time. Varying when we snapped the ball wou8ld have helped but running the play clock to 1 or 2 sec's every time took away from the element we should have been usinf to keep defenses off balance. Smash mouth football teams like the Giants of the early 90's (where im sure Mangini got some of his tactics) use to run the clock down to 1 damn near every snap. They did that to control the clock and that team just shoved the ball down your throat they were about ball control and defense. It was plain and simple they really didnt care if you knew what was coming they simply imposed there will on most teams.

    IMO the current coaching staff of the Jets has there priorities completely mixed up. They have the wrong personell on both sides of the ball yet the coaching staff tries to run systems that can only be run with the type of players that were used to run such systems. Mangini learned these systems but he made crutial mistakes in personell which was glaringly evident this year.

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