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Thread: OT 220V electrical question

  1. #1
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    OT 220V electrical question

    So my Bud got an electric car ($42,000 Yaris) and it likes a 220V outlet to charge on, and I want to be able to use 2 110V outlets to gain 220V for when he comes to visit.

    I am thinking of making up a box with a 220V dryer type of outlet on it and connecting it via 2 extension cords to 2 separate 110V outlets on different circuits?

    In other words I am trying to make a 110 to 220 adapter.
    Last edited by gunnails; 01-26-2009 at 09:16 PM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunnails View Post
    So my Bud got an electric car ($42,000 Yaris) and it likes a 220V outlet to charge on, and I want to be able to use 2 110V outlets to gain 220V for when he comes to visit.

    I am thinking of making up a box with a 220V dryer type of outlet on it and connecting it via 2 extension cords to 2 separate 110V outlets on different circuits?

    In other words I am trying to make a 110 to 220 adapter.
    Sounds pretty scary...

    Seriously, I'm no expert. But from what I know from school, I'm not sure if this will work. You should definitely talk to someone who knows his ****. Or, and this is what I recommend, get a transformer.

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    All you need to have is two legs of 110. Dryers work on two 110's. One leg for the element and one for the tub. An electric range works a little different, it has the two 110's and a neutral. Either way, it shouldn't be very difficult once you know how to wire it. Just make sure you use at least 10 gauge wire and a good ground!

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    good call by your friend...sorry, no electrician here...but good luck

  5. #5
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    220-221 Whatever it takes................

    Consult a licensed electrician. If not be sure to post pictures of the fire.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by gunnails View Post
    So my Bud got an electric car ($42,000 Yaris) and it likes a 220V outlet to charge on, and I want to be able to use 2 110V outlets to gain 220V for when he comes to visit.

    I am thinking of making up a box with a 220V dryer type of outlet on it and connecting it via 2 extension cords to 2 separate 110V outlets on different circuits?

    In other words I am trying to make a 110 to 220 adapter.
    While you can rig it this way to work it is not a safe way to do this.
    1st if you pick to crkts on the same phase you will not have 220 you will have 110 if there is a neutral and nothing if there isn't.

    2nd If there is a problem with the crkt and it trips both legs will not be off just the one that tripped. where as in a correct installed both legs would be on a two pole breaker and when tripped both would cut off. would the charging system on the care be damaged if that happened ?

    I would suggest to either install the 220 outlet right or checking to see if there is a household adaptor for the charger

  7. #7
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    Here's where the DIY electricians have their monthly meeting:


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    this is hilarious.

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    Quote Originally Posted by northernrebel View Post
    While you can rig it this way to work it is not a safe way to do this.
    1st if you pick to crkts on the same phase you will not have 220 you will have 110 if there is a neutral and nothing if there isn't.
    I understand I need 2 different 110 circuits in order for the phase part to work


    2nd If there is a problem with the crkt and it trips both legs will not be off just the one that tripped. where as in a correct installed both legs would be on a two pole breaker and when tripped both would cut off. would the charging system on the care be damaged if that happened ?
    It only draws 12 amps at 220, and can charge on 110 only but it takes twice as long.
    I would suggest to either install the 220 outlet right or checking to see if there is a household adaptor for the charger
    They do make a converter like I am talking about.
    http://www.quick220.com/220_volt.htm


    My panel is loaded up and do not want to put in a 220 for the few times it will get used.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by nycdan View Post
    Here's where the DIY electricians have their monthly meeting:

    This is what happens to Morons.

    I have some electrical exp.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigEthel View Post
    All you need to have is two legs of 110. Dryers work on two 110's. One leg for the element and one for the tub. An electric range works a little different, it has the two 110's and a neutral. Either way, it shouldn't be very difficult once you know how to wire it. Just make sure you use at least 10 gauge wire and a good ground!
    You can pretty much ignore this one. Just because some appliances are designed to work off of a pair of 110 circuits does NOT mean you can combine them safely for all 220v appliances. Do you even know how many amps the car needs to pull?

    So many ways this can end badly I'm just going to say "call an electrician".

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigEthel View Post
    All you need to have is two legs of 110. Dryers work on two 110's. One leg for the element and one for the tub. An electric range works a little different, it has the two 110's and a neutral. Either way, it shouldn't be very difficult once you know how to wire it. Just make sure you use at least 10 gauge wire and a good ground!
    ===============================================

    220 is just 2 hot legs (110V) and a neutral, as long as I pull from seperate circuits and bond my neutral and ground, I should be golden?

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    Quote Originally Posted by nycdan View Post
    You can pretty much ignore this one. Just because some appliances are designed to work off of a pair of 110 circuits does NOT mean you can combine them safely for all 220v appliances. Do you even know how many amps the car needs to pull?

    So many ways this can end badly I'm just going to say "call an electrician".
    ==================================================

    Car pulls 12 to 14 amps at 220 and about 3 to 5 at 110V.

    I understand this is more involved then most DIYers could do, just asking for some experienced advice.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GMCJETS View Post
    220-221 Whatever it takes................
    dude whats that from. It made me laugh and I know I heard it somewhere. What movie or show?

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by jets31 View Post
    dude whats that from. It made me laugh and I know I heard it somewhere. What movie or show?

    Mr. MOM

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    Quote Originally Posted by gunnails View Post
    ===============================================

    220 is just 2 hot legs (110V) and a neutral, as long as I pull from seperate circuits and bond my neutral and ground, I should be golden?
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong....dude, seriously...call an ELECTRICIAN.

    OK...110 circuit: When the circuit is in use current is "pushed" through the fixture by way of the "hot" wire and then to ground by way of the neutral, and unless something goes wrong the bare ground wire doesn't do anything except to remain ever vigilant in case of a problem.

    Since house current is alternating current the actual direction that the electrons flow reverses direction 60 times per second (60 cycles)....Put another way, the hot wire has a negative charge alternating with an equal positive charge, and the polarity of the hot wire reverses 60 times per second....

    220/240 circuit:

    1) A black wire which is often known as the "hot" wire, which carries the current in to the fixture.
    2) Another "hot" wire which may be blue, red or white (if it is white the code actually requires it to painted or otherwise marked one of the other colors, but often it is not) which also carries current in to the fixture.
    3) A bare copper wire called the ground, the sole function of which is to enhance user safety.

    That's it, no neutral. Now, if you are paying attention, then you are probably wondering "If there isn't a neutral wire then how is the circuit completed?" The answer is that when one hot wire is negative, then the other is positive, so the two hot wires complete the circuit together because they are "out of phase". This is why 240 volt circuits connect to double pole breakers that are essentially two single pole breakers tied together....In the main panel, every other breaker is out of phase with the adjoining breakers.... so, in essence 240 volt wiring is powered by 2 - 120 volt hot wires that are 180 degrees out of phase.(they need to be out of phase to work....if they are not, I don't know what could happen because I never decided to mickey mouse electrical, I figured it's one of those things that you just want to do safe. It might blow up, it just might not work. I don't know, but if you try it out let me know so I can pass the waring onto others.... ; ) )

    There is another class of 240 volt equipment......some appliances (such as clothes dryers and ranges) use 240 volt current to power their main function (drying clothes or cooking food or my wife's vibrator) but use 120 volt current to power accessories such as the clock on your stove or the light inside the oven... or the digital readout on your dryer controls.........That is why some 240 volt circuits have four wires:

    1) A black wire which is often known as the "hot" wire, which carries the current in to the fixture.
    2) Another "hot" wire which is red, which also carries current in to the fixture.
    3) A white wire called the neutral which completes the electrical circuit for the 120 volt accessories only.
    4) A bare copper wire called the ground, the sole function of which is to enhance user safety.

    At one time, the code allowed for one insulated wire to function as both ground and neutral in 120 / 240 volt combo circuits, but now all such circuits must use the 4 wire scheme....this is why your new dryer (or electric range) might have 4 prongs on its plug and your old dryer receptacle only has 3 holes. In which case Electric Code allows for the "pigtail"...(the cord and plug assembly)...to be changed to match the old 3 wire receptacle as long as certain conditions are met. The National Electric Code allows that, but your local code might not, so check first, or even better yet make a deal with the appliance dealer to do it for you.....
    Last edited by PlumberKhan; 01-27-2009 at 07:52 AM.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunnails View Post
    So my Bud got an electric car ($42,000 Yaris) and it likes a 220V outlet to charge on, and I want to be able to use 2 110V outlets to gain 220V for when he comes to visit.

    I am thinking of making up a box with a 220V dryer type of outlet on it and connecting it via 2 extension cords to 2 separate 110V outlets on different circuits?

    In other words I am trying to make a 110 to 220 adapter.

    He spent 42K on a small car to save money on Gas???

    Make sure you charge his ass for the electricity when he comes to your house.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlumberKhan View Post
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong....dude, seriously...call an ELECTRICIAN.

    OK...110 circuit: When the circuit is in use current is "pushed" through the fixture by way of the "hot" wire and then to ground by way of the neutral, and unless something goes wrong the bare ground wire doesn't do anything except to remain ever vigilant in case of a problem.

    Since house current is alternating current the actual direction that the electrons flow reverses direction 60 times per second (60 cycles)....Put another way, the hot wire has a negative charge alternating with an equal positive charge, and the polarity of the hot wire reverses 60 times per second....

    220/240 circuit:

    1) A black wire which is often known as the "hot" wire, which carries the current in to the fixture.
    2) Another "hot" wire which may be blue, red or white (if it is white the code actually requires it to painted or otherwise marked one of the other colors, but often it is not) which also carries current in to the fixture.
    3) A bare copper wire called the ground, the sole function of which is to enhance user safety.

    That's it, no neutral. Now, if you are paying attention, then you are probably wondering "If there isn't a neutral wire then how is the circuit completed?" The answer is that when one hot wire is negative, then the other is positive, so the two hot wires complete the circuit together because they are "out of phase". This is why 240 volt circuits connect to double pole breakers that are essentially two single pole breakers tied together....In the main panel, every other breaker is out of phase with the adjoining breakers.... so, in essence 240 volt wiring is powered by 2 - 120 volt hot wires that are 180 degrees out of phase.(they need to be out of phase to work....if they are not, I don't know what could happen because I never decided to mickey mouse electrical, I figured it's one of those things that you just want to do safe. It might blow up, it just might not work. I don't know, but if you try it out let me know so I can pass the waring onto others.... ; ) )

    There is another class of 240 volt equipment......some appliances (such as clothes dryers and ranges) use 240 volt current to power their main function (drying clothes or cooking food or my wife's vibrator) but use 120 volt current to power accessories such as the clock on your stove or the light inside the oven... or the digital readout on your dryer controls.........That is why some 240 volt circuits have four wires:

    1) A black wire which is often known as the "hot" wire, which carries the current in to the fixture.
    2) Another "hot" wire which is red, which also carries current in to the fixture.
    3) A white wire called the neutral which completes the electrical circuit for the 120 volt accessories only.
    4) A bare copper wire called the ground, the sole function of which is to enhance user safety.

    At one time, the code allowed for one insulated wire to function as both ground and neutral in 120 / 240 volt combo circuits, but now all such circuits must use the 4 wire scheme....this is why your new dryer (or electric range) might have 4 prongs on its plug and your old dryer receptacle only has 3 holes. In which case Electric Code allows for the "pigtail"...(the cord and plug assembly)...to be changed to match the old 3 wire receptacle as long as certain conditions are met. The National Electric Code allows that, but your local code might not, so check first, or even better yet make a deal with the appliance dealer to do it for you.....
    Not Bad!...but I thought you were a plumber?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by frostlich View Post
    Not Bad!...but I thought you were a plumber?
    My friends a plumber, and plumbers need to have an electrical background............wiring Hot Waterheaters, Garbage Dispos. etc.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by frostlich View Post
    Not Bad!...but I thought you were a plumber?
    Neither. Now I'm a project manager for a non-profit that builds group homes to house people with severe mental illness and physical disability. I used to fix pipes...now I d*ck around with Excel all day. I see the connection, don't you?

    Seriously though, I was an electrician before I was a plumber. I've done a ton of work for Rieger Homes and Toll Brothers...my grandfather ran an electrical business for 30 years before he passed away, I ran my own for 3 before I gave it up for plumbing(which pays MUCH better)

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