Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Another Reason Vrentas Is Off The Charts

  1. #1
    All League
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    2,724

    Another Reason Vrentas Is Off The Charts

    Great article, she really does her research:



    Calvin Pace often feels like outsiders don’t understand the Jets defense, don’t get his role in a scheme that morphs and shifts and uses its players in unorthodox ways.

    They see that Pace, an outside linebacker in the prime of his career, had 5.5 sacks last season. And they ask him why he didn’t have more.

    “It does bother me,” Pace said. “As much as people want me to be a pass rusher, I don’t really view myself as a pass rusher. I do everything. I probably do more than any outside linebacker in a 3-4 defense, and I’m cool with that. I like that.

    “But don’t pigeonhole me with (Giants defensive end) Osi (Umenyiora), who is a great pass rusher, but he’s a great pass rusher because that’s all he does. It’s like hitting home runs; if you get enough at-bats, you’ll hit a home run.”

    In the Jets’ ‘spread the wealth’ system, pressure can come from anywhere on the field, which explains why defensive backs contributed 11 of the team’s 40 sacks last year. Defensive coordinator Mike Pettine has presented the concept to his unit like this: Would you rather have one player batting .400 and everyone else at .200, or the whole team hitting .300?

    But keeping with the baseball analogy, one of the Jets’ goals this year is to raise their average. During the NFL lockout, the coaching staff studied, analyzed and brought in defensive line guru Rex Norris to answer a fundamental question: “How can we put more pressure on the quarterback?”

    As they transfer that work onto the field in training camp, the Jets are relying on Pace to be their leader — especially as they move on without veteran pass rushers Shaun Ellis, Jason Taylor and Trevor Pryce. The team has made an offer to Ellis, but he also visited the Patriots and is mulling his options as a free agent.

    “Calvin’s our guy, there’s no question about it,” outside linebackers coach Jeff Weeks said. “He can change a game on a single rush. We know he has that ability, and we’re just trying to get everything out of him. We want to get him going early.”

    A fast start isn’t something Pace, now in his ninth season, has had a chance to do under coach Rex Ryan. In 2009, he served a four-game suspension for violating the league’s performance-enhancing substance policy. Last year, he missed the first four games after breaking a bone in his foot during the preseason, mandating surgery to insert a screw along his pinky toe. By season’s end, the bone was only 20 percent healed, Ryan revealed last week.

    Pace said he is now 100 percent healthy, and when he reported to Florham Park for camp, Ryan and Weeks talked about sparking him early. They told Pace he may be given more chances to purely rush the passer and go for those home runs. That would not cancel out Pace’s other duties, though, which include dropping into coverage or eating up blockers on some downs.

    Ryan simply wants to maximize Pace’s “10-sacks potential.” The Jets have not had a player with a double-digit sack total during the coach’s tenure — nor since John Abraham in 2005.

    “It wasn’t a big sit-down, but we talked,” Pace said. “They said, ‘We’re trying to get a chance to do some different things, give you a little more opportunities.’ It’s not something I asked for.”

    Along with Pace, the Jets will lean on veteran outside linebacker Bryan Thomas, who had a team-high six sacks last season, and third-year player Jamaal Westerman, whom they have tagged as a “designated pass rusher.”

    The team used its first two draft picks on defensive linemen, Muhammad Wilkerson and Kenrick Ellis, adding youth to the front seven. Wilkerson, who is expected to contribute right away, has been studying a DVD the coaches made with cut-ups of Pryce, whom he mimics in size and style.

    Weeks and defensive line coach Mark Carrier spent hours in the film room this offseason, part of that time devoted to a pass rush cut-up reel. They watched their own players, categorizing the plays by defensive call and charting the outcomes. They broke down every one of the nearly 1,200 sacks recorded in the NFL last year, marking down the circumstance (i.e. blown assignment) and the movement used (i.e. line stunts).

    More coverage:
    • Complete Jets coverage on NJ.com

    • Jets videos

    • Jets photos

    “We’ve added things; we’ve put more emphasis in our game plan and in our practice plans,” Carrier said. “Doing things to get movement with our front, studying film with our guys while we have the time. I’m trying to take more of an aggressive approach at the beginning of our training camp. Let’s get it in our mindset now.”

    The coaches have added more pass rush drills to the meat of the padded practice, Carrier said, a welcome byproduct of the new practice schedule under the recently ratified collective bargaining agreement.

    One focus for these drills, gleaned from the offseason film review, is working with their defensive front on converting from a run stance to a pass stance more quickly, Weeks said. When the defenders can tell the opponent is going to throw, they need to go at the edge of the offensive linemen’s bodies instead of straight ahead, allowing them to use their pass rush moves more effectively and create inside pressure.

    Another observation that stood out to the coaches on tape was the full impact of Pace’s foot injury. Sick of sitting in the training room, he jumped back in as soon as doctors told him he could not make the injury worse. But the pain persisted until at least November, a dulling sensation that rose from the flat of his right foot.

    In his first games back, Pace said his foot felt as though it had been “turned off,” like a light switch, sometimes forcing him to limp as he took a step. He struggled to plant or push off and didn’t have enough strength to hold opponents up with pressure on that leg. He found himself compensating by shifting weight forward or to the left side of his body, a dangerous gamble.


    Discussing the Jets wide receivers, leadership in the locker room, and TomlinsonStar-Ledger reporters Conor Orr and Jenny Vrentas discuss the Jets wide receiver situation, the leadership in the locker room and the third down role of LaDainian Tomlinson. Video by John Munson/The Star-LedgerWatch video


    In his first few games back, against Minnesota and Denver, Pace said he took himself out toward the end, recognizing he would hurt the team by staying in. He felt better each week, though he noted the firm artificial turf at New Meadowlands Stadium was a challenge to his recovery.

    Fast forward to a brand-new season, and time has since mended the bone completely. Pace never has and never will measure himself by his sack total, but he also understands that this season, the spread-the-wealth defense may be asking him to cash in more.

    “I really am pushing to have more sacks and kind of alleviate some of the pressure on the outside guys, (Darrelle) Revis and (Antonio) Cromartie,” Pace said. “It is our job to make it easier on them, so they’re not covering all day. When I get my chance, I’ve got to make it count.”

    For more Jets coverage, follow Jenny Vrentas on Twitter at twitter.com/Jennyvrentas

    Jenny Vrentas: jvrentas@starledger.com

  2. #2
    Rookie
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cedar Rapids, Iowa
    Posts
    694
    Nice read. Good reporting. Thanks

  3. #3
    All Pro
    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    6,600
    Outstanding article thank you so much for the post!!

  4. #4
    yes she's a very diligent reporter...doesn't just mail it in

  5. #5
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    22,792
    Good read. Thanks for posting..Jenny does her homework.

  6. #6
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida, United States
    Posts
    12,867

    brian Costello does his homework too

    Ryan expects Pace to return Jets to pass-rush glory days
    Jets Blog By BRIAN COSTELLO

    Last Updated: 8:49 AM, August 4, 2011

    Posted: 1:23 AM, August 4, 2011


    Rushing the passer is in the DNA of the Jets’ organization.

    The “Sack Exchange” may be the most celebrated group of Jets players other than the 1968 championship team. But the Jets have gone five seasons without a premier pass rusher and have flopped in their attempts to throw big bucks at the problem.

    The Jets look strong in many areas as the 2011 season begins, but the pass rush remains a question mark. In the last week, the team made a strong pursuit of top cornerback Nnamdi Asomugha, then re-signed Antonio Cromartie to give them a solid corner opposite Darrelle Revis. But the biggest problem for the Jets defense may not be stopping receivers, but getting to the quarterback.



    Last year, the Jets were eighth in the NFL with 40 sacks, but gone from that team are Jason Taylor (5), Shaun Ellis (4 1/2), Drew Coleman (4) and James Ihedigbo (3). Ellis and Ihedigbo remain free agents, and could return, but the Jets are going to need more contributions elsewhere.

    Rex Ryan is talking up outside linebacker Calvin Pace as the player to lead the rush this year. The Jets gave Pace a six-year, $42 million contract in 2008. He’s been good at times, but has not lived up to that contract.

    Pace declined an interview request yesterday, but Ryan did enough talking for him. After missing the first four games of last year following a broken right foot, Pace was never 100 percent, Ryan said. He finished the year with 5 1/2 sacks.

    “At the end of the year, his foot was 20 percent healed,” Ryan said. “I was shocked when I heard that. He’s out there gutting through it. Yeah we think [he could have] one of those potential 10-sack seasons and all that, he has that kind of ability. There’s no doubt.”

    The Jets have not had a player with 10 sacks since John Abraham in 2005. The truth is Abraham is the last top-flight pass rusher the team has had. They signed Pace and drafted Vernon Gholston in 2008, hoping to solve the problem, committing $82 million on the two players. Gholston famously finished his Jets career without a sack.

    This year, the Jets used their first-round pick on defensive lineman Muhammad Wilkerson, who they believe can be an effective interior pass rusher. Ryan spoke glowingly about the rookie this week, but the team remains interested in bringing back Ellis, who joined the team in 2000 along with Abraham. Mitch Frankel, the agent for Ellis, said the Jets have offered him the veterans’ minimum (around $900,000) to return this year.

    “He’s contemplating their offer,” said Frankel, who declined to say if other teams are interested.

    The Jets were expected to be better at rushing the passer under Ryan than his predecessor, Eric Mangini, because of Ryan’s attacking scheme. They finished 18th in the league in 2009 with 32 sacks and eighth last year with 40.

    Besides Pace, Ryan will be counting on Bryan Thomas and Jamaal Westerman to bring the heat on opposing quarterbacks. Westerman is in his third year, and Ryan said he will be the team’s designated pass rusher on passing downs.

    “Overall, I don’t think we’re as bad as maybe the people want to [say],” Ryan said. “We never had the guy with 10, 12 sacks, but we had a lot of guys with sacks. We were eighth in the league last year in number of sacks. So I don’t think we’re as desperate as [it is] out there. I think Westerman has a chance. It’s finally time, it’s his third year, it’s time to unleash him.”

    brian.costello@nypost.com


    Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/sports/jets/...#ixzz1ULaL8CM7

  7. #7
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    5,515
    Good article, but all of the Calvin Pace talk every year bores me. I definitely feel like this guy will go down in Jets lore as yet another bust due to the contract given to him and the expectations. There is always an excuse with this guy. We're stuck with him because we paid him big money so they act like he's Derrick Thomas in waiting. Only problem is he's 30 years old already and hasn't produced. I'll believe it when I actually see it with this guy.

    As I have said for a while already, Westerman should have played a long time ago. He was a good pass rusher at RU.

    Calvin Pace ranked among the bottom five outside linebackers in a pass-rushing effectiveness study recently published by ProFootballFocus.com.
    The study basically factors in sacks, hits, and pressures divided by pass-rushing opportunities. Pace's failure to generate consistent pressure leaves outside linebacker as a top need going into the draft. The Chiefs' Tamba Hali ranked as the top outside linebacker, the Pats' Mike Wright as the top interior lineman, and the Eagles' Brandon Graham as the top rookie in PFF's study. Mar 16, 5:39 PM
    Source: Pro Football Focus
    http://www.rotoworld.com/player/nfl/2054/calvin-pace
    Last edited by escamoter2; 08-07-2011 at 10:01 AM.

  8. #8
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    22,792
    Quote Originally Posted by KRL View Post
    Great article, she really does her research:


    Calvin Pace often feels like outsiders don’t understand the Jets defense, don’t get his role in a scheme that morphs and shifts and uses its players in unorthodox ways.

    They see that Pace, an outside linebacker in the prime of his career, had 5.5 sacks last season. And they ask him why he didn’t have more.

    “It does bother me,” Pace said. “As much as people want me to be a pass rusher, I don’t really view myself as a pass rusher. I do everything. I probably do more than any outside linebacker in a 3-4 defense, and I’m cool with that. I like that.

    “But don’t pigeonhole me with (Giants defensive end) Osi (Umenyiora), who is a great pass rusher, but he’s a great pass rusher because that’s all he does. It’s like hitting home runs; if you get enough at-bats, you’ll hit a home run.”

    In the Jets’ ‘spread the wealth’ system, pressure can come from anywhere on the field, which explains why defensive backs contributed 11 of the team’s 40 sacks last year. Defensive coordinator Mike Pettine has presented the concept to his unit like this: Would you rather have one player batting .400 and everyone else at .200, or the whole team hitting .300?

    But keeping with the baseball analogy, one of the Jets’ goals this year is to raise their average. During the NFL lockout, the coaching staff studied, analyzed and brought in defensive line guru Rex Norris to answer a fundamental question: “How can we put more pressure on the quarterback?”

    As they transfer that work onto the field in training camp, the Jets are relying on Pace to be their leader — especially as they move on without veteran pass rushers Shaun Ellis, Jason Taylor and Trevor Pryce. The team has made an offer to Ellis, but he also visited the Patriots and is mulling his options as a free agent.

    “Calvin’s our guy, there’s no question about it,” outside linebackers coach Jeff Weeks said. “He can change a game on a single rush. We know he has that ability, and we’re just trying to get everything out of him. We want to get him going early.”

    A fast start isn’t something Pace, now in his ninth season, has had a chance to do under coach Rex Ryan. In 2009, he served a four-game suspension for violating the league’s performance-enhancing substance policy. Last year, he missed the first four games after breaking a bone in his foot during the preseason, mandating surgery to insert a screw along his pinky toe. By season’s end, the bone was only 20 percent healed, Ryan revealed last week.

    Pace said he is now 100 percent healthy, and when he reported to Florham Park for camp, Ryan and Weeks talked about sparking him early. They told Pace he may be given more chances to purely rush the passer and go for those home runs. That would not cancel out Pace’s other duties, though, which include dropping into coverage or eating up blockers on some downs.

    Ryan simply wants to maximize Pace’s “10-sacks potential.” The Jets have not had a player with a double-digit sack total during the coach’s tenure — nor since John Abraham in 2005.

    “It wasn’t a big sit-down, but we talked,” Pace said. “They said, ‘We’re trying to get a chance to do some different things, give you a little more opportunities.’ It’s not something I asked for.”

    Along with Pace, the Jets will lean on veteran outside linebacker Bryan Thomas, who had a team-high six sacks last season, and third-year player Jamaal Westerman, whom they have tagged as a “designated pass rusher.”

    The team used its first two draft picks on defensive linemen, Muhammad Wilkerson and Kenrick Ellis, adding youth to the front seven. Wilkerson, who is expected to contribute right away, has been studying a DVD the coaches made with cut-ups of Pryce, whom he mimics in size and style.

    Weeks and defensive line coach Mark Carrier spent hours in the film room this offseason, part of that time devoted to a pass rush cut-up reel. They watched their own players, categorizing the plays by defensive call and charting the outcomes. They broke down every one of the nearly 1,200 sacks recorded in the NFL last year, marking down the circumstance (i.e. blown assignment) and the movement used (i.e. line stunts).

    “We’ve added things; we’ve put more emphasis in our game plan and in our practice plans,” Carrier said. “Doing things to get movement with our front, studying film with our guys while we have the time. I’m trying to take more of an aggressive approach at the beginning of our training camp. Let’s get it in our mindset now.”

    The coaches have added more pass rush drills to the meat of the padded practice, Carrier said, a welcome byproduct of the new practice schedule under the recently ratified collective bargaining agreement.

    One focus for these drills, gleaned from the offseason film review, is working with their defensive front on converting from a run stance to a pass stance more quickly, Weeks said. When the defenders can tell the opponent is going to throw, they need to go at the edge of the offensive linemen’s bodies instead of straight ahead, allowing them to use their pass rush moves more effectively and create inside pressure.

    Another observation that stood out to the coaches on tape was the full impact of Pace’s foot injury. Sick of sitting in the training room, he jumped back in as soon as doctors told him he could not make the injury worse. But the pain persisted until at least November, a dulling sensation that rose from the flat of his right foot.

    In his first games back, Pace said his foot felt as though it had been “turned off,” like a light switch, sometimes forcing him to limp as he took a step. He struggled to plant or push off and didn’t have enough strength to hold opponents up with pressure on that leg. He found himself compensating by shifting weight forward or to the left side of his body, a dangerous gamble.

    In his first few games back, against Minnesota and Denver, Pace said he took himself out toward the end, recognizing he would hurt the team by staying in. He felt better each week, though he noted the firm artificial turf at New Meadowlands Stadium was a challenge to his recovery.

    Fast forward to a brand-new season, and time has since mended the bone completely. Pace never has and never will measure himself by his sack total, but he also understands that this season, the spread-the-wealth defense may be asking him to cash in more.

    “I really am pushing to have more sacks and kind of alleviate some of the pressure on the outside guys, (Darrelle) Revis and (Antonio) Cromartie,” Pace said. “It is our job to make it easier on them, so they’re not covering all day. When I get my chance, I’ve got to make it count.”

    For more Jets coverage, follow Jenny Vrentas on Twitter at twitter.com/Jennyvrentas

    Jenny Vrentas: jvrentas@starledger.com


    Jets studied every one of nearly 1,200 sacks in NFL during lockout, looking for trends. They also brought in D-line guru Rex Norris. #nyj

    Pace: “It wasn’t a big sit-down, but we talked ... It’s not something I asked for." #nyj

    Pace said Rex Ryan + OLB coach J. Weeks told him he'll have more chances this yr to purely rush the passer and go for those home runs.

    https://twitter.com/#!/JennyVrentas

    Never heard of Rex Norris


    Rex Norris (born December 10, 1939 in Tipton, Indiana) is a former college linebacker who has coached college football and NFL teams during the past 40 years.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rex_Nor...an_football%29


    Pretty funny article..Quite the character.

    http://blog.newsok.com/berrytramel/2...ne-rex-norris/
    Last edited by C Mart; 08-07-2011 at 10:09 AM.

  9. #9
    I clicked on the link expecting boobies...

    And yeah, I'm with you escamoter2, so sick of the Pace talk year after year. He's got 2 jobs in pass D either cover or rush, and he ain't doing too well in either department. The next evolution of his job needs to be on the bench.

  10. #10
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    5,515
    Quote Originally Posted by C Mart View Post
    Jets studied every one of nearly 1,200 sacks in NFL during lockout, looking for trends. They also brought in D-line guru Rex Norris. #nyj

    Pace: “It wasn’t a big sit-down, but we talked ... It’s not something I asked for." #nyj

    Pace said Rex Ryan + OLB coach J. Weeks told him he'll have more chances this yr to purely rush the passer and go for those home runs.

    https://twitter.com/#!/JennyVrentas

    Never heard of Rex Norris


    Rex Norris (born December 10, 1939 in Tipton, Indiana) is a former college linebacker who has coached college football and NFL teams during the past 40 years.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rex_Nor...an_football%29
    At this point, I think we need to bring in Chuck Norris to teach Calvin Pace how to attack OL and the QB.

    http://youtu.be/BrOwcZPwDO8

  11. #11
    All League
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    4,088
    Good article thanks for posting. Want to see more from Calvin and what Westerman has to offer

  12. #12
    Hall of Fame
    Charter JI Member

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    Atlanta via NJ
    Posts
    8,321
    ... not quite as good as a KRL training camp report ...


    ... pretty good effort by jenny though ...













    l_j_r

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Follow Us