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Thread: An Argument: Play Calling and Inflexibility, the Failure to Adapt

  1. #1
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    An Argument: Play Calling and Inflexibility, the Failure to Adapt

    Yes, a Shotty Thread.

    But one I hope is specific and detailed enough to explain my concerns with last night.

    The Situation: You face one of the best defenses in the NFL, missing your All-Pro Center and lynchpin of your O-line. You also are somewhat weak in terms of O-line depth and have yet to establish a consistent running game, instead favoring a shift to a pass-first scheme.

    Early Results: Failure to establish the run or provide adequate pass protection for Sanchez has the Jets Offense unproductive, and the QB making bad decisions and failing to protect the ball under constant and heavy pressure.

    The Criticism:

    It's almost a cliché, but when you face a situation as we faced last night, great speedy pressure D vs. a weakened and in some cases badly inexperienced O-line, there are a number of things to do to offset the D's advantage.

    1. The Rollout. When you are facing great pressure, moving the QB out of the pocket in the rollout gives him more time and a better view of the field, reduces pressure and gives the QB more ability to avoid pressure/see incoming defenders.

    2. Play-Action. Yes, this works much better when you establish the run first, but even if you're only running for a few yards a carry, play action still forces the D to hesitate even for only a second, thus giving the QB a vital extra second before the pressure gets him.

    3. Shotgun & Throw Deep. Force the D to hold off by at least efforting to throw the ball deep, and let your talented WR's in Holmes, and tall WR in Buress, or great receiving RB in LT, or even your speed-burner in Kerley, to run to the deep ball. If done right (and Sanchez has the arm to do it right), INT risk is reduced, and pressure has to hold back some, or face over-extending in, leaving a deep threat open.

    4. Misdirection. Screen passes, counter-tre, that nice fake-the-give-it-to-Terminator type runs. Make a fast reaction D like the Ravens go one way, then quickly go the other. Another is the fast TE 5 yard quick-Out.

    5. Establish the Run at All Costs. With a weak and inexperienced (together and at C) O-line, running, i.e. "hey you, snap it then run forward hard and hit someone", letting your playmakers Greene, LT and yes, McKnight, try to make something happen is still a better decision than having Sanchez drop back every down and get crushed from lack of protection. The O-line can get into a groove, and when you do shift to the passing game, play-action works better, and the O-line has more chance to hit a D player on his heels then going full bore forward.

    These are some of the most established ways to offset our known and exposed weaknesses last night. What I saw last night was apparently no effort to utilize any of them, or change from what was clearly not working, to any of these somewhat standard ideas fro how to handle our situation.

    Sanchez, best as I could tell, did not run any planned rollouts last night. Play-Action too was almost non-existent.

    We were clearly still in a pass-first-pass-regularly frame of Offensive scheme, and did not deviate from that even when it was clearly not working and not productive.

    We did try a few misdirection runs late, and for the most part they were hit or miss (as expected) but productive enough (2-8 yards a go). We did try a few screens, but not very successfully due to no other part of the O working and pressure not being reduced in any other forms.

    We never tried to go deep or throw long to ease the pressure. LT was rarely out int he passing game deep, and no attempt was made to float one for Burress to go up and get (his supposed biggest asset, his height, physicality and leaping).

    And we never made establishing the run, for the O-line to gel or our slow-starting #1 RB to get rolling, a priority last night. We stayed with a poorly working strait-dropback non-shotgun short-slant passing game that was getting eaten alive, and made no real attempt to change to suit the circumstances, the pressure or the talent (and lack thereof) we had on the field for us.

    It is my view that this is a core cause of our defeat last night, a failure to adapt, to change the play calling and scheme and direction of the O to suit the opponent and the circumstances.

    Yes, execution was horrible as well, and Sanchez shoulders much of the responsibility for failed execution, decision making and worst of all, protecting the ball under pressure.

    But it is my assertion that our O-Co never put Sanchez, his weakened O-line, or the Jets O as a whole in a position to succeed, knowing the type of D and the pressure we would going to face.

    It is my assertion that this inability/unwillingness to adapt on the fly, or adapt to suit out talent, is the core failure of Shotty as an O-Co, and the reason the Jets O has not lived up to the talent it possess in the Shotty Era, and has remained both inconsistent, and only of average productivity/reliability in his time as Jets O-Co.

    In the NFL, inflexibility and stagnation are routes to failure. Solutions existed to help our beleaguered O-line and QB, and we simply did to utilize them. We remained stubborn and predictable, wedded to the "new" Jets O ideal of pass-first we've seen thus far in 2011, and unwilling to change it to suit the game as it unfolded.

    This O must change to suit where and what we are. If it does not, this team will not be a playoff team in 2011.
    Last edited by Warfish; 10-03-2011 at 02:04 PM.

  2. #2
    Finally... A Schotty post that is well thought out.

    Well said, Fisty...

  3. #3
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    Great post. Seems that Holmes, LT, Sanchez & Mason would agree.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Warfish View Post

    In the NFL, inflexibility and stagnation are routes to failure. Solutions existed to help our beleaguered O-line and QB, and we simply did to utilize them. We remained stubborn and predictable, wedded to the "new" Jets O ideal of pass-first we've seen thus far in 2011, and unwilling to change it to suit the game as it unfolded.

    This O must change to suit where and what we are. If it does not, this team will not be a playoff team in 2011.
    Rex and Schitty both subscribe to the "stick to what works" theory and it's gotten us nowhere.

    As you said, there are many wrinkles that could have been employed to take the pressure off the middle of the OL and we didn't try any of them. That alone is enough to throw his ass out of town.

    SAR I

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    Quote Originally Posted by Warfish View Post
    But it is my assertion that our O-Co never put Sanchez, his weakened O-line, or the Jets O as a whole in a position to succeed, knowing the type of D and the pressure we would going to face.
    This sums it up... not only are the types of plays/methods of attack you chronicle in the post needed versus a defense like the Ravens, many of them play directly into the strengths of our still developing QB.

  6. #6
    Yeah, last night was the first time this season where I thought Schotty really did a poor job playcalling and having a feel for the game. I don't understand why roll-outs were not used. I don't agree that we should have kept feeding the ground game. The runs inside were just hopeless. I thought maybe we'd try some pitches outside like what worked against Oakland, but maybe we thought the Ravens team speed on D would prevent that. I for one thought a trick play or wildcat might have been in order. When you're desperate you have to try desperate measures. Schotty did not last night.

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    they kept trying to re-establish the run

    the problem was they didn't take care of the ball

    i dont see how that falls on schotty

    every QB in the league faces pressure every game they dont all turn it over 10 times in 4 games

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    Agreed 100%, basically what I have been trying to say but in much better detail, Warfish

    I would like to add that Sanchez's best assets are using his feet to get outside the pocket and look downfield, improvising, and down-field passing

    What Sanchez is not good at is quick timing and short-accuracy, and that is exactly our passing game last night in a nutshell

    We ran NOTHING that played to our QB's strengths, and ran EVERYTHING that went perfectly with his weaknesses.....Unreal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bitonti View Post
    they kept trying to re-establish the run

    the problem was they didn't take care of the ball

    i dont see how that falls on schotty

    every QB in the league faces pressure every game they dont all turn it over 10 times in 4 games
    Not that kind of pressure. It was embarrassing.
    Last edited by OrangeJet; 10-03-2011 at 02:18 PM.

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    the problem stems from rex's view of his defense. he believes he can have a very conservative offense b/c his defense will always keep him in games. he believes he can run greene into the line all day b/c in the 4th quarter, the opposing team will be worn out and unable to stop it.

    however, when rex's defense can't rush the passer, and gives up early scores, it puts pressure on the offense to keep them in games. this usually means benching greene and using LT as a receiving option.

    in my opinion, the flaw in rex's thinking is that the offensive philosophy is a byproduct of his opinion of the defense. the offense should always be in attack mode, not ground and pound. the offensive plays, formations and personnel should be varied to minimize predictability. rex prepares for a 70s defensive slugfest, while most other nfl teams prepare for shootouts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bitonti View Post
    every QB in the league faces pressure every game they dont all turn it over 10 times in 4 games
    But when multiple QBs in your system do, that is a problem. This isn't a Sanchez problem as much as it is an OC problem. Seriously, Mark can improve a ton but it will likely take a change similar to Pennington or Favre. The kid needs a new OC.

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    When you're faced with Ngata and Ray Lewis clogging up the middle you run up the middle. Why? That's the Schotty away. Adjust to make things harder for your offense so your defense has to stay on the field the entire game.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by bitonti View Post
    they kept trying to re-establish the run

    the problem was they didn't take care of the ball

    i dont see how that falls on schotty

    every QB in the league faces pressure every game they dont all turn it over 10 times in 4 games
    The turnovers are such a problem. I really am concerned about this week's game. Foxboro has been a house of horrors for Mark with turnovers in 2 of the 3 games he's played there. He's just been so careless with his throws and feeling the pressure and identifying blitzes. You can't go on the road and beat a good team if you turn the ball over. It just won't happen.

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    I think the Jets need to get destroyed by a team like the Seahawks for Rex to actually wake up and see there's a problem. Or else he'll just keep saying "Ya gotta give credit to the opponent" "They're a hell of a defense"

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    Quote Originally Posted by TerminatorJet View Post
    When you're faced with Ngata and Ray Lewis clogging up the middle you run up the middle. Why? That's the Schotty away. Adjust to make things harder for your offense so your defense has to stay on the field the entire game.
    that was just plain stubborn, period. rex refused to back down. but that's what happens when you coach with your ego, not your brain. like when he called the time out to scream at them. you dont burn a TO to vent. that's not who i want as my coach.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bitonti View Post
    they kept trying to re-establish the run

    the problem was they didn't take care of the ball

    i dont see how that falls on schotty

    every QB in the league faces pressure every game they dont all turn it over 10 times in 4 games
    And some of that falls on ****ty Bit...

    Sanchez might be forcing things too much because he knows he's going to keep getting the same crappy calls throughout a game, and forces things in when he sees a possibility.

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    Agree with the OP's premise. I've always felt that Shotty (Von Schleppenheimer, to quote another poster) is a paper OC. He's great at drawing up schemes in his garage/toilet/office, whatever, but at game time he's like a deer in the headlights. The offensive gameplan gets stuck, there's little flexibility, except what appears a soft, pre-planned adjustment but a complete lack of timing, rhythm, feel for what's happening within the game. Anyone see the Giants game yesterday? For the last couple of games, Gilbride showed some real field generalship. He saw gaps in opponent and seized on them. His play-calling seemed sure-handed and elegant... what a contrast, and I'm no Giants fan.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warfish View Post
    Yes, a Shotty Thread.

    But one I hope is specific and detailed enough to explain my concerns with last night.

    The Situation: You face one of the best defenses in the NFL, missing your All-Pro Center and lynchpin of your O-line. You also are somewhat weak in terms of O-line depth and have yet to establish a consistent running game, instead favoring a shift to a pass-first scheme.

    Early Results: Failure to establish the run or provide adequate pass protection for Sanchez has the Jets Offense unproductive, and the QB making bad decisions and failing to protect the ball under constant and heavy pressure.

    The Criticism:

    It's almost a cliché, but when you face a situation as we faced last night, great speedy pressure D vs. a weakened and in some cases badly inexperienced O-line, there are a number of things to do to offset the D's advantage.

    1. The Rollout. When you are facing great pressure, moving the QB out of the pocket in the rollout gives him more time and a better view of the field, reduces pressure and gives the QB more ability to avoid pressure/see incoming defenders.

    2. Play-Action. Yes, this works much better when you establish the run first, but even if you're only running for a few yards a carry, play action still forces the D to hesitate even for only a second, thus giving the QB a vital extra second before the pressure gets him.

    3. Shotgun & Throw Deep. Force the D to hold off by at least efforting to throw the ball deep, and let your talented WR's in Holmes, and tall WR in Buress, or great receiving RB in LT, or even your speed-burner in Kerley, to run to the deep ball. If done right (and Sanchez has the arm to do it right), INT risk is reduced, and pressure has to hold back some, or face over-extending in, leaving a deep threat open.

    4. Misdirection. Screen passes, counter-tre, that nice fake-the-give-it-to-Terminator type runs. Make a fast reaction D like the Ravens go one way, then quickly go the other. Another is the fast TE 5 yard quick-Out.

    5. Establish the Run at All Costs. With a weak and inexperienced (together and at C) O-line, running, i.e. "hey you, snap it then run forward hard and hit someone", letting your playmakers Greene, LT and yes, McKnight, try to make something happen is still a better decision than having Sanchez drop back every down and get crushed from lack of protection. The O-line can get into a groove, and when you do shift to the passing game, play-action works better, and the O-line has more chance to hit a D player on his heels then going full bore forward.

    These are some of the most established ways to offset our known and exposed weaknesses last night. What I saw last night was apparently no effort to utilize any of them, or change from what was clearly not working, to any of these somewhat standard ideas fro how to handle our situation.

    Sanchez, best as I could tell, did not run any planned rollouts last night. Play-Action too was almost non-existent.

    We were clearly still in a pass-first-pass-regularly frame of Offensive scheme, and did not deviate from that even when it was clearly not working and not productive.

    We did try a few misdirection runs late, and for the most part they were hit or miss (as expected) but productive enough (2-8 yards a go). We did try a few screens, but not very successfully due to no other part of the O working and pressure not being reduced in any other forms.

    We never tried to go deep or throw long to ease the pressure. LT was rarely out int he passing game deep, and no attempt was made to float one for Burress to go up and get (his supposed biggest asset, his height, physicality and leaping).

    And we never made establishing the run, for the O-line to gel or our slow-starting #1 RB to get rolling, a priority last night. We stayed with a poorly working strait-dropback non-shotgun short-slant passing game that was getting eaten alive, and made no real attempt to change to suit the circumstances, the pressure or the talent (and lack thereof) we had on the field for us.

    It is my view that this is a core cause of our defeat last night, a failure to adapt, to change the play calling and scheme and direction of the O to suit the opponent and the circumstances.

    Yes, execution was horrible as well, and Sanchez shoulders much of the responsibility for failed execution, decision making and worst of all, protecting the ball under pressure.

    But it is my assertion that our O-Co never put Sanchez, his weakened O-line, or the Jets O as a whole in a position to succeed, knowing the type of D and the pressure we would going to face.

    It is my assertion that this inability/unwillingness to adapt on the fly, or adapt to suit out talent, is the core failure of Shotty as an O-Co, and the reason the Jets O has not lived up to the talent it possess in the Shotty Era, and has remained both inconsistent, and only of average productivity/reliability in his time as Jets O-Co.

    In the NFL, inflexibility and stagnation are routes to failure. Solutions existed to help our beleaguered O-line and QB, and we simply did to utilize them. We remained stubborn and predictable, wedded to the "new" Jets O ideal of pass-first we've seen thus far in 2011, and unwilling to change it to suit the game as it unfolded.

    This O must change to suit where and what we are. If it does not, this team will not be a playoff team in 2011.
    Well put! This has been a problem the entire Schotty era! Usually if our defense faulters one half they usually re-establish themselves the next half; but when our Offense falls flat they consistently fall flat the entire game and never adjust!

  19. #19
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    Very nice post, Warfish. You made some sound, football observations and I really enjoyed reading it.

    Unfortunately, the football acuity of some people on this board is next to nil, so they will not comprehend most of what you wrote and will just attack it as another "Schotty bash" post.

    Kudos for having the patience to put that together. I've been spouting similar stuff for awhile, but never to that level of analysis. Nice job!

  20. #20
    I been a big schotty defender for a long time, but this last 2 games has totally changed my mind about him. It reminds me of the chad pennington dink and dunk offense we used to run. I still think the oline is the bigger problem, its just that bad. No holes what so ever to establish a running game and maybe 1 second is all sanchez has to make a decision. So its very hard to call intermediate routes. But that being said, its become so predictable, defenses are ready for the short routes. That stupid ball sanchez threw that got picked was so predictable, he ran that play 2ce already.

    Think of something new to get this offense rolling already. Screens, draw, bootlegs, rollouts, jump balls to plax, even short crossing patterns. The play calling sucks, the offense is boring. We need mangold back and we need new play calling and we need it fast, otherwise we can kiss this season good bye.

    oh and by the way, you should forward that orginal post to rex's and tannys email. we need to make a petition and put it in the paper or something lol.

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