Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23

Thread: Rah Rah I Miss You

  1. #1
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    5,473

    Smile Rah Rah I Miss You

    Has anyone seen Rah Rah around?

  2. #2
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    15,029
    He'll probably make a thread about how this team is still good and ascending or something. He'll say "SOJF" about 5-10 times, tell someone to "CAN IT!", claim that everyone is obsessed with him, e-scream at everyone, and that'll be it.
    Last edited by McGinley; 10-26-2014 at 05:46 PM.

  3. #3
    All League
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    3,013
    Quote Originally Posted by rextilleon View Post
    Has anyone seen Rah Rah around?
    He was last seen trying to toss footballs into a waste management garbage can during a commercial break...

  4. #4
    Undrafted Free Agent
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    137
    Quote Originally Posted by Conkboy View Post
    He was last seen trying to toss footballs into a waste management garbage can during a commercial break...
    He'll be giving a press conference tomorrow, right?

  5. #5
    Mods,


    Isn't this thread a violation of the rules?

  6. #6
    Excuse him for actually supporting his team instead of blindly trashing it. What a world.

  7. #7
    Stay classy

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by jetssjumets View Post
    Mods,


    Isn't this thread a violation of the rules?
    You're a violation of the rules.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by EternalChampion View Post
    You're a violation of the rules.
    Isn't that what you were told at birth? See, I could hurl insults too. Now, GFY!

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by jetssjumets View Post
    Isn't that what you were told at birth? See, I could hurl insults too. Now, GFY!
    That's stupid, I'm more clever.

  11. #11
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    5,473
    Quote Originally Posted by jetssjumets View Post
    Mods,


    Isn't this thread a violation of the rules?
    Lighten up. A little light kidding amidst this train wreck is needed. And you my friend are a snitch!

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by EternalChampion View Post
    That's stupid, I'm more clever.
    Great. Pat yourself on the back and go suck a dick!

  13. #13
    All League
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    3,013
    Quote Originally Posted by EternalChampion View Post
    That's stupid, I'm more clever.
    Conundrum: “cleverer” or “more clever”, “simpler” or “more simple” etc
    up vote
    7
    down vote
    favorite
    I know the rule for making the comparative and superlative form for two-syllable words
    ending in y, replace the -y with i and use -er and -est :

    hap.py → happier → (the) happiest
    ti.dy → tidier → (the) tidiest*

    And I would say that for two-syllable adjectives which do not end in-y, use more and most:

    bor.ing → more boring
    wor.ried → more worried
    care.ful → more careful
    tra.gic → more tragic

    However, there are inexplicable exceptions: The Free Dictionary says the comparative and superlative form of clever is cleverer and cleverest. Yet to my ears

    He's more clever than I thought
    sounds more formal and correct.

    Google produces an impressive 761,000 results and 255,000 results for "He is more clever than" and "He's more clever than" compared to only 337,000 results and 318,000 results for "He's cleverer than" and "He is cleverer than", which suggests that more clever is preferable.

    Similarly, TFD insists that the comparative and superlative form of simple is simpler and simplest. Google seems to concur and produces a whopping 11,900,000 results for "It is simpler than" compared to 7,060,000 results for "It is more simple than".

    The two-syllable adjectives that I am aware of, which have both kinds of comparative and superlative forms are:

    clever → cleverer/more clever → cleverest/(the) most clever
    common → commoner/more common → commonest/(the) most common
    gentle → gentler/more gentle → gentlest/(the) most gentle
    humble → humbler/more humble (etc.)
    hollow → hollower/more hollow
    narrow → narrower/more narrow
    polite → politer/more polite
    quiet → quieter/more quiet
    simple → simpler/more simple
    stupid → stupider/more stupid
    subtle → subtler/more subtle
    Is there any explanation for this? Is it perhaps a recent trend, etymologically speaking? It seems to me that the number of two-syllable adjectives that add -er and -est are increasing.
    And finally, is there a trick or rule which I can teach to my advanced private students?
    With younger learners and beginners I teach the "rule" that I mentioned at the beginning—so much simpler!

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by jetssjumets View Post
    Great. Pat yourself on the back and go suck a dick!
    Heh, not bad, there's hope for you.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Conkboy View Post
    Conundrum: “cleverer” or “more clever”, “simpler” or “more simple” etc
    up vote
    7
    down vote
    favorite
    I know the rule for making the comparative and superlative form for two-syllable words
    ending in y, replace the -y with i and use -er and -est :

    hap.py → happier → (the) happiest
    ti.dy → tidier → (the) tidiest*

    And I would say that for two-syllable adjectives which do not end in-y, use more and most:

    bor.ing → more boring
    wor.ried → more worried
    care.ful → more careful
    tra.gic → more tragic

    However, there are inexplicable exceptions: The Free Dictionary says the comparative and superlative form of clever is cleverer and cleverest. Yet to my ears

    He's more clever than I thought
    sounds more formal and correct.

    Google produces an impressive 761,000 results and 255,000 results for "He is more clever than" and "He's more clever than" compared to only 337,000 results and 318,000 results for "He's cleverer than" and "He is cleverer than", which suggests that more clever is preferable.

    Similarly, TFD insists that the comparative and superlative form of simple is simpler and simplest. Google seems to concur and produces a whopping 11,900,000 results for "It is simpler than" compared to 7,060,000 results for "It is more simple than".

    The two-syllable adjectives that I am aware of, which have both kinds of comparative and superlative forms are:

    clever → cleverer/more clever → cleverest/(the) most clever
    common → commoner/more common → commonest/(the) most common
    gentle → gentler/more gentle → gentlest/(the) most gentle
    humble → humbler/more humble (etc.)
    hollow → hollower/more hollow
    narrow → narrower/more narrow
    polite → politer/more polite
    quiet → quieter/more quiet
    simple → simpler/more simple
    stupid → stupider/more stupid
    subtle → subtler/more subtle
    Is there any explanation for this? Is it perhaps a recent trend, etymologically speaking? It seems to me that the number of two-syllable adjectives that add -er and -est are increasing.
    And finally, is there a trick or rule which I can teach to my advanced private students?
    With younger learners and beginners I teach the "rule" that I mentioned at the beginning—so much simpler!
    It's "more clever" in the JI style guide.

  16. #16
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    21,205
    Leave Ray alone.

  17. #17
    All League
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    3,013
    Quote Originally Posted by EternalChampion View Post
    It's "more clever" in the JI style guide.
    LMAO...

  18. #18
    All League
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    2,659
    I need a little positivity. Hit us with anything Ray

  19. #19

    The Jets Really Turned Some Heads Today

    I don't think anyone saw that kind of performance coming against Buffalo. The rest of the league is taking note!

  20. #20
    All League
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    4,458
    The not only turned heads, they turned stomachs.

    What a nauseating display of I don't give a $hit, garbage football.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Follow Us