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Thread: Smoke and Mirrors

  1. #1
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    ..pulls no punches. Another solid and sadly true piece-

    Smoke and Mirrors
    by Kevin Newell
    Jets Insider.com Head Writer
    knewell@jetsinsider.com


    9/16/2003 - EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. – Does anyone see a pattern here?

    Following Sunday’s 21-10 loss to the hated Miami Dolphins, the Jets not only find themselves alone in last place of the rugged AFC East Division, but they’re 0-2 start is eerily similar to the precarious positions they have found themselves in for the past two seasons – digging out of a hole.

    We all know that Gang Green limped to a 1-4 and 2-5 start before gaining momentum a year ago. The team rallied from a 1-2 mark in 2001 before winning five of its next six to right itself for a playoff run. So if history is any indication, the Jets should be OK. Or will they?

    Can we honestly expect this team to continue its Houdini act or have they run out of lives? Let’s be honest with one another. If not for the foot of two kickers – John Hall and Adam Vinatieri, respectively – we don’t go to the playoffs two successive years nor do we win the AFC East title last season.

    You have to be both lucky and good to win in the NFL. However, most people will take talent over a rabbit’s foot any day of the week. And based on what we’ve seen the past two weeks, the Jets just don’t have the talent to pull themselves out of a tailspin.

    The smart money says the good fortune may have finally caught up with Gang Green. The core of the team is getting old and the overall team speed is not fast by current NFL standards. That’s why you get Dolphins 21, Jets 10. Miami’s coaches exploited those two weaknesses perfectly.

    So the question begs: Who is to blame? There is plenty of finger pointing to go around. But like everything else, it all starts at the top. From general manager Terry Bradway to Herman Edwards, Paul Hackett and Ted Cottrell, all the way down to offensive line coach Doug Marrone and the scouting staff. Of course, the players must also share the burden.

    Inevitably it all lands at the feet of Bradway. He has done nothing to distinguish himself as a competent GM. He has basically been living off leftovers from previous regimes. Not one of his drafted players has done anything to distinguish themselves or make the Jets a better football team.

    The heart and soul of the team – Curtis Martin, Vinny Testaverde, Kevin Mawae, Wayne Chrebet, Mo Lewis, Marvin Jones, et al, were all brought in by Bill Parcells and his predecessors and are in the twilight of their careers. Even the 2000 draft bonanza that netted John Abraham, Shaun Ellis, Chad Pennington, and Anthony Becht was part of the Parcells-Al Groh regime.

    Lest we forget, Pennington saved Bradway’s and Edwards’ collective behinds last season. I dare anyone in the organization to stand up and admit that Pennington was their guy – the quarterback of the future. There were strong rumors within the halls of Weeb Ewbank Hall that no one thought Chad had what it took to become a top-flight QB in the team’s West Coast offense. Boy were they wrong!

    If Testaverde doesn’t get hurt in Jacksonville, Chad is still toting a clipboard.

    Here’s what Bradway has done in his three years. His last two first round picks, Dewayne Robertson and Bryan Thomas, have been non-factors. Thomas is a missing person and Robertson, a work in progress, doesn’t appear to be worth the two first round picks Bradway gambled on the next Warren Sapp. He’s been more of a sap.

    One thing is for certain: Bradway has a penchant for trading away a slew of picks for a player he covets. In 2001, his first draft, Bradway gave up the Jets first round pick (No. 19), along with its second round pick and sixth round pick in order to move up three places to select Santana Moss. As for Robertson, Bradway surrendered the 13th and 22nd picks of the first round and a fourth rounder to jump to No. 4. Suffice to say, neither Moss nor Robertson appear to have been worth it, although Santana had a break-out game the other day.

    Basically, Bradway has eschewed the teams’ clear need to draft for depth and speed for one player.

    Here’s something else to chew on: Of the 19 players Bradway chose in his three drafts with the organization, only two – Kareem McKenzie and Jon McGraw – start. I don’t count Robertson because we all know that if Josh Evans hadn’t been suspended by the NFL, DeRob would be a back-up. The only other player to have any kind of impact is Lamont Jordan, who was the No. 2 pick in 2001. That’s pathetic.

    Conversely, Bradway has lost Aaron Glenn, Marcus Coleman, Kerry Jenkins, Ryan Young, Randy Thomas, Laveranues Coles, and John Hall to either the expansion draft or free agency.

    As for free agent acquisitions, Bradway has also failed. Here’s some of the so-called talent that Bradway has assembled: Cowart, Evans, Donnie Abraham, Sam Garnes, Dave Szott, and Tom Nutten, who retired. Not a star in the bunch. And we’re still waiting for that big receiver we’ve been promised. Hey Terry, how’d Matthew Hachette work out?

    Yes, I understand salary cap ramifications and all that. But today’s NFL GM must do his due diligence. Just look at what’s going on in New England and Buffalo, where the Bills’ Tom Donohoe and the Pats’ Bill Belichick are not only stockpiling draft picks, but signing quality free agents at key positions. All Bradway has done is make do-do.

    The present day configuration of the Jets is nothing more than a good ole boys network. Bradway, Edwards and Hackett all worked together in Kansas City, where unless I missed something, was not a bastion of football greatness during their tenures. Edwards used his Tampa Bay connections to bring in some of his former players like Donnie Abraham, Damien Robinson, and Steve White – the latter two being total wastes of time. And Cottrell coached Sam Cowart in Buffalo, where the latter seems to have left his Pro Bowl talent.

    In some ways the Jets middle management and coaching staff is the NFL version of Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon. You know the game: Gene Hackman starred with Morgan Freeman in Unforgiven who starred with Tim Robbins in The Shawshank Redemption who starred with Tom Cruise in Top Gun who starred with Kevin Bacon in A Few Good Men. Get the picture?

    At least the aforementioned actors have a couple of Oscars between them. The Jets actors don’t own a Super Bowl ring between them.

    What transpired on the field Sunday at Co-Tenant Stadium was horrific and a possible sign of worse things to come. For several years the Jets and Jets fan have reveled in the Monday Night Miracle against Miami. The latest effort could be remembered as the Sunday Afternoon Debacle. It was that bad.

    Not only were the Jets outrushed by the Fish, 187-21, but at the end of the second quarter Miami held a 136-9 advantage.

    The Jets run defense is putrid and the teams’ run offense is non-existent. The defense is allowing a staggering 173.5 rushing yards per game while the running game is averaging an abysmal 39 yards per game and 2.4 yards per carry. And we all know that games are won and lost on the lines.

    Replacing one cog in an NFL offensive line is tough enough. To replace three in two years is almost impossible. While McKenzie has stepped in wonderfully at right tackle for Young, the losses of both Jenkins and Thomas have been more significant.

    That has been apparent in the lack of production by Martin, who likes to run between the tackles. Poor guard play has resulted in a poor running game. Left guard Szott and right guard Brent Smith are both playing on surgically repaired knees. Smith, a converted tackle, is also playing out of position. The lack of drive and speed is obvious.

    As for the defense, it’s become more and more apparent that the Cover-2 scheme is not working. In order to have success with the Tampa defense, you need run stuffing lineman, track-star linebackers, and read-and-react corners. The Jets have neither. Jason Ferguson is overmatched in the trenches. Robertson is playing like a rookie. Chester McGlockton is showing his age. Lewis and Jones are dinosaurs and are continually out of position or too slow to stop the run. Donnie Abraham, Aaron Beasley, and Ray Mickens are serviceable but not the prototypical corners for the Cover-2.

    In successive games, both Redskins’ QB Patrick Ramsey and Dolphins’ QB Jay Fielder have hung the LB’s out to dry with pivotal running plays. Ramsey’s resulted in the game-winning field goal. Fielder’s went for a 9-yard touchdown run.

    This is not meant as a doom and gloom column. It’s just telling like it is. The Jets have good enough talent to stay competitive, particularly with Chad at the helm. However, if the team’s brass doesn’t start putting their fingers in the dike, Pennington may wind up like Joe Namath in the 70s and be a great quarterback on a poor team getting the crap kicked out of him week in and week out.

    No one wants to bear witness to that.

    All we’ve heard for the past couple of seasons from Bradway, Edwards and Co. is that the players must be held accountable. While they make a valid point, doesn’t that also apply to the organization’s hierarchy?

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    sums it up pretty well

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    While I agree with most of what you say, I beg to take issue with 2 points:

    1. The Jets only traded a 4th and a 6th to move up to draft Santana Moss and they moved from 16 to 14 in the first round. They still had a second round selection which was used on Lamont Jordan. McKenzie was the 3rd rounder and they got Henderson in the 4th with an extra 4th rounder.

    2. While clearly not the long-term answer, Chester McGlockton has been the only consistant interior defensive player on the team. While he's not the player he was 5 years ago, he's still a solid D-Tackle.

  4. #4
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    This is a column you will never read in the NY tabloids ... it's too intelligent, requires immense knowledge of football {and what is required to build a winning football team}, and requires a deep understanding of the NY Jets personnel.

    In short ... it requires WORK and it requires THOUGHT ... can't be lazy and write a column like this one ... and that's why you will rarely {if ever} see a column like this in the NY tabloids.

    Great Job, Newell

  5. #5
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    Originally posted by cdflip78@Sep 16 2003, 08:25 PM
    The Jets only traded a 4th and a 6th to move up to draft Santana Moss and they moved from 16 to 14 in the first round. They still had a second round selection which was used on Lamont Jordan.
    True 78, Newell did miss this detail {nice find by you} ... but his larger point was deadly accurate

    IMHO

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by Bugg@Sep 17 2003, 12:08 AM
    ..pulls no punches. Another solid and sadly true piece-

    Smoke and Mirrors
    by Kevin Newell
    Jets Insider.com Head Writer
    knewell@jetsinsider.com


    9/16/2003 - EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. – Does anyone see a pattern here?

    Following Sunday’s 21-10 loss to the hated Miami Dolphins, the Jets not only find themselves alone in last place of the rugged AFC East Division, but they’re 0-2 start is eerily similar to the precarious positions they have found themselves in for the past two seasons – digging out of a hole.

    We all know that Gang Green limped to a 1-4 and 2-5 start before gaining momentum a year ago. The team rallied from a 1-2 mark in 2001 before winning five of its next six to right itself for a playoff run. So if history is any indication, the Jets should be OK. Or will they?

    Can we honestly expect this team to continue its Houdini act or have they run out of lives? Let’s be honest with one another. If not for the foot of two kickers – John Hall and Adam Vinatieri, respectively – we don’t go to the playoffs two successive years nor do we win the AFC East title last season.

    You have to be both lucky and good to win in the NFL. However, most people will take talent over a rabbit’s foot any day of the week. And based on what we’ve seen the past two weeks, the Jets just don’t have the talent to pull themselves out of a tailspin.

    The smart money says the good fortune may have finally caught up with Gang Green. The core of the team is getting old and the overall team speed is not fast by current NFL standards. That’s why you get Dolphins 21, Jets 10. Miami’s coaches exploited those two weaknesses perfectly.

    So the question begs: Who is to blame? There is plenty of finger pointing to go around. But like everything else, it all starts at the top. From general manager Terry Bradway to Herman Edwards, Paul Hackett and Ted Cottrell, all the way down to offensive line coach Doug Marrone and the scouting staff. Of course, the players must also share the burden.

    Inevitably it all lands at the feet of Bradway. He has done nothing to distinguish himself as a competent GM. He has basically been living off leftovers from previous regimes. Not one of his drafted players has done anything to distinguish themselves or make the Jets a better football team.

    The heart and soul of the team – Curtis Martin, Vinny Testaverde, Kevin Mawae, Wayne Chrebet, Mo Lewis, Marvin Jones, et al, were all brought in by Bill Parcells and his predecessors and are in the twilight of their careers. Even the 2000 draft bonanza that netted John Abraham, Shaun Ellis, Chad Pennington, and Anthony Becht was part of the Parcells-Al Groh regime.

    Lest we forget, Pennington saved Bradway’s and Edwards’ collective behinds last season. I dare anyone in the organization to stand up and admit that Pennington was their guy – the quarterback of the future. There were strong rumors within the halls of Weeb Ewbank Hall that no one thought Chad had what it took to become a top-flight QB in the team’s West Coast offense. Boy were they wrong!

    If Testaverde doesn’t get hurt in Jacksonville, Chad is still toting a clipboard.

    Here’s what Bradway has done in his three years. His last two first round picks, Dewayne Robertson and Bryan Thomas, have been non-factors. Thomas is a missing person and Robertson, a work in progress, doesn’t appear to be worth the two first round picks Bradway gambled on the next Warren Sapp. He’s been more of a sap.

    One thing is for certain: Bradway has a penchant for trading away a slew of picks for a player he covets. In 2001, his first draft, Bradway gave up the Jets first round pick (No. 19), along with its second round pick and sixth round pick in order to move up three places to select Santana Moss. As for Robertson, Bradway surrendered the 13th and 22nd picks of the first round and a fourth rounder to jump to No. 4. Suffice to say, neither Moss nor Robertson appear to have been worth it, although Santana had a break-out game the other day.

    Basically, Bradway has eschewed the teams’ clear need to draft for depth and speed for one player.

    Here’s something else to chew on: Of the 19 players Bradway chose in his three drafts with the organization, only two – Kareem McKenzie and Jon McGraw – start. I don’t count Robertson because we all know that if Josh Evans hadn’t been suspended by the NFL, DeRob would be a back-up. The only other player to have any kind of impact is Lamont Jordan, who was the No. 2 pick in 2001. That’s pathetic.

    Conversely, Bradway has lost Aaron Glenn, Marcus Coleman, Kerry Jenkins, Ryan Young, Randy Thomas, Laveranues Coles, and John Hall to either the expansion draft or free agency.

    As for free agent acquisitions, Bradway has also failed. Here’s some of the so-called talent that Bradway has assembled: Cowart, Evans, Donnie Abraham, Sam Garnes, Dave Szott, and Tom Nutten, who retired. Not a star in the bunch. And we’re still waiting for that big receiver we’ve been promised. Hey Terry, how’d Matthew Hachette work out?

    Yes, I understand salary cap ramifications and all that. But today’s NFL GM must do his due diligence. Just look at what’s going on in New England and Buffalo, where the Bills’ Tom Donohoe and the Pats’ Bill Belichick are not only stockpiling draft picks, but signing quality free agents at key positions. All Bradway has done is make do-do.

    The present day configuration of the Jets is nothing more than a good ole boys network. Bradway, Edwards and Hackett all worked together in Kansas City, where unless I missed something, was not a bastion of football greatness during their tenures. Edwards used his Tampa Bay connections to bring in some of his former players like Donnie Abraham, Damien Robinson, and Steve White – the latter two being total wastes of time. And Cottrell coached Sam Cowart in Buffalo, where the latter seems to have left his Pro Bowl talent.

    In some ways the Jets middle management and coaching staff is the NFL version of Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon. You know the game: Gene Hackman starred with Morgan Freeman in Unforgiven who starred with Tim Robbins in The Shawshank Redemption who starred with Tom Cruise in Top Gun who starred with Kevin Bacon in A Few Good Men. Get the picture?

    At least the aforementioned actors have a couple of Oscars between them. The Jets actors don’t own a Super Bowl ring between them.

    What transpired on the field Sunday at Co-Tenant Stadium was horrific and a possible sign of worse things to come. For several years the Jets and Jets fan have reveled in the Monday Night Miracle against Miami. The latest effort could be remembered as the Sunday Afternoon Debacle. It was that bad.

    Not only were the Jets outrushed by the Fish, 187-21, but at the end of the second quarter Miami held a 136-9 advantage.

    The Jets run defense is putrid and the teams’ run offense is non-existent. The defense is allowing a staggering 173.5 rushing yards per game while the running game is averaging an abysmal 39 yards per game and 2.4 yards per carry. And we all know that games are won and lost on the lines.

    Replacing one cog in an NFL offensive line is tough enough. To replace three in two years is almost impossible. While McKenzie has stepped in wonderfully at right tackle for Young, the losses of both Jenkins and Thomas have been more significant.

    That has been apparent in the lack of production by Martin, who likes to run between the tackles. Poor guard play has resulted in a poor running game. Left guard Szott and right guard Brent Smith are both playing on surgically repaired knees. Smith, a converted tackle, is also playing out of position. The lack of drive and speed is obvious.

    As for the defense, it’s become more and more apparent that the Cover-2 scheme is not working. In order to have success with the Tampa defense, you need run stuffing lineman, track-star linebackers, and read-and-react corners. The Jets have neither. Jason Ferguson is overmatched in the trenches. Robertson is playing like a rookie. Chester McGlockton is showing his age. Lewis and Jones are dinosaurs and are continually out of position or too slow to stop the run. Donnie Abraham, Aaron Beasley, and Ray Mickens are serviceable but not the prototypical corners for the Cover-2.

    In successive games, both Redskins’ QB Patrick Ramsey and Dolphins’ QB Jay Fielder have hung the LB’s out to dry with pivotal running plays. Ramsey’s resulted in the game-winning field goal. Fielder’s went for a 9-yard touchdown run.

    This is not meant as a doom and gloom column. It’s just telling like it is. The Jets have good enough talent to stay competitive, particularly with Chad at the helm. However, if the team’s brass doesn’t start putting their fingers in the dike, Pennington may wind up like Joe Namath in the 70s and be a great quarterback on a poor team getting the crap kicked out of him week in and week out.

    No one wants to bear witness to that.

    All we’ve heard for the past couple of seasons from Bradway, Edwards and Co. is that the players must be held accountable. While they make a valid point, doesn’t that also apply to the organization’s hierarchy?
    Wow, that's alot of negative ink.
    That's it- I'm burning my ticket's

  7. #7
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    Kevin's perspective is so out of whack, I don't know where to start.

    In just 180 minutes of football (the last playoff game vs. Oakland and the first two 2003 regular season games), the Jets have morphed from unstoppable (see 41-0 playoff win against Indy), with excellent management and coaching, to putrid, manned by bums who should be run out of town.

    Here's a newsflash for you, Kevin: The key figure in the franchise is on the sidelines. He's the difference maker. The current QB isn't suited for this offense. That one substitution is the difference between the Jets having the ball for 20 minutes a game vs. 35 minutes a game. Huge.

    I don't think anyone wanted to accept reality when Chad went down. Vinny is never going to lead this team back to the playoffs.

    Our defensive performance looks remarkably similar to last year. It gives up a lot of yards, but not a ton of points. The old "bend-don't-break" thing. Combine that with ball control offense, and it works. It's a sound theory. During Chad's tenure, the Jets proved they could hold people to under 20 points a game last year, while putting up better than 20 points themselves. It's about ball control. The other guy has trouble getting the ball when your QB completes 70% of his passes. It also lets your running backs get more yards per carry because the good short passing game forces defenses to look away from the run. See Tampa Bay. See Oakland. This Jets team is modelled on that concept. When you take the ball-control QB out of the equation, the entire thing falls apart.

    Let this sink into your psyche, because it's really pretty simple: This team's success hinges on Chad Pennington's ability to run a ball control offense that routinely drives down the field, eats up both yards and minutes, and delivers points and bad field position for the other team.

    If you've ever watched Tampa play without Doug Johnson...they suck. The QB is the linchpin in a WCO team. I've haven't seen Oaklands backup very much, but most people agree that without Gannon, the Raiders wouldn't do much. The right guy makes it all look great. Anybody else makes it look like s**t.

    We can't give credit to the current management for picking Chad, but we have to give them credit for training him for 2+ years. It's clear that when he stepped in last year, he was ready. That part is not an accident.

    Kevin, I understand your frustration. I'm frustrated, too. But my frustration was born on August 23rd, not last Sunday against the fins, or the Thursday before against the skins. It's easy to react to losses and pass out blame by the bucketful. But you have to look at little deeper at the root causes if you want to accurately asses the situation.

    Regarding the offseason:

    - Chad Morton looks very pedestrian so far. Kinda points to the fact that Westhoff is the star of special teams.
    - John Hall had a field goal blocked last week. Remember last year, people saying he should be run out of town for those?
    - Coles looks great. We all know he's an excellent receiver. Patrick Ramsey is maturing and playing well, and Lavernues is benefitting. But he did cost an arm and a leg. If he keeps this up all season, he will have been worth it. But what's he gonna say when they need to redo his contract in two years? How many teams can one guy possibly be Angry with?
    - Thomas...hard to tell. Washington is running the ball better than last year. But he too was very expensive. We haven't given up anything in pass protection, but we arent running the all well. Jury is out.

  8. #8
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    I read the piece. Good writing. Jesus, guy must be a Jets fan, huh?

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    GOOD Article kevin ,now put a stamp on it and mail it to woody ,so he knows where the problems are.

  10. #10
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    Good points. I was not aware that Hall had a field goal blocled? How far was the kick? I am curious because last year the distance didn't seem to matter. Once in awhile he blasted the kicks straight into the line.

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    The point of all your "Chad isn't here" talk is that the FO and CS get a pass since Pennington went down.

    SHort answer to that is NO EFFIN' WAY. In the NFL, it's a given that on average no starting QB plays 16 games. If they do, it's a miracle. Which means we could have expected to start the backup QB 2 or 3 times even without this catastrophe. SO if you backup isn't suited to your system, why is he here in the 1st place, salary cap be damned.

    If Pennington is THE DIFFERENCE in the whole equation, you'd have to say the CS and FO are a little suspect. Especially since Edwards almost didn't put Pennington in there until he had a gun to his head and a vice to his privates. Remember as Kevin does "he may never be ready"?

    Please-enough with the "bend, don't break" as a guiding philosophy. It's just the reality when your LBs are old and slow. You mean the plan is to give up long, time -consuming drives? Newsflash back at you-during the entire Edwards regime, the Jets have been one of the worst teams in total offensive snaps run and total offensive snaps allowed. THIS CS WOULDN'T KNOW BALL COTROL SMASHMOUTH FOOTBALL IF IT BIT THEM IN THE ASS.

    The Bucs QB is BRAD Johnson.

    It's not just 180 minutes of football, it's 1/8 of a the schedule. ANd they've been awful.

    Bottom line-YOU have given up on the season and will give the FO and CS a pass.

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    I'm with Bugg - if the difference between winning and losing is one player, then this whole team is the house of cards that Bradway and Herm built.

    If your offense is so complex that only one quarterback can run it, then it's too complex.

    The old boys act is apparent in the way that Herm wont bench the vets to play the rookies - i.e. Lewis for Hobson.

    Until you've been to an Edwards family barbeque, there ain't no way you're starting!

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    Guys we are talking like the season is done!! Cmon, you all remember the slow start the last 2 seasons. It is very possible that the slow start is just what we are to expect from a Herm Edwards Coached team.

    I am not going to give up on the season until we reach 0-6

    Right now it is very possible to come back.

    The one change I want to see now is for Hermy to let Vinny call his own plays. The guy is smart and has been around long enough to do it.

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    Bugg, yes, of course it's BRAD Johnson. I was tired when I wrote that.

    No, the FO doesn't get a pass. The buck still stops with them. But I'm not willing to indict, convict and sentance on 1/8th of a season when the key franchise player is on the sidelines. Vinny is still here and playing now because of cap reasons, and that's a legacy of the previous management.

    Similar dialogue happened last year at 1-4 . If I remember correctly, you were one of the prime contributors that wanted management carted out of town, before the Jets embarked on a remarkable turnaround.

    If giving a pass to the FO and the coaching staff means letting them have the necessary rope to hang themselves, I'm all for it.

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    RBSTERN:

    Good points. And it's true that Vinny is here because the previous regime gave him that 'lifetime" contract that will bust the cap if he is cut. This team is successful when they have ball control, and that can only happen with a Q/B that can hit the quick openers, which opens up the line for the running game. The defense will give uo yards, but not many points. And if the offense had better ball control, the defense would give up less yards and less points, since they wouldn't be out there so much.

    Still, the off. line has not blocked well on the run. Pass blocking has been fine, but not run blocking. This is partially a product of the Skins and Fish using a stacked defensive setup, such as 8 men in the box, etc. Quick passes would open things up. Vinny isn't known for these things.

    On defense, Mo and Marvin have looked slow, and are not tackling well. This is hurting. If the def. line would control their gaps better, the run defense would be better.

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    All accurate. Anyone can make a mistake from being tired.

    It's just too easy to keep whining about the cap number of Testaverde. WHy isn't there a Jim Miller/Chris Chandler/Detmer brother guy here on the cheap if Testaverde sucks so bad?More proof Bradway hasn't got an idea in his gray matter. And again, this CS pretty much had no choice but to go with Pennington. Any idea that they embraced or wanted Pennington is revisionist nonsense as Newell points out.

    Yes- I still think the FO and CS SUCK. The fact that Pennington's great run wallpapered over the problems that are now bare doesn't change the fact that this mess is their doing. THEY'VE BEEN HERE 3 YEARS. Stop whining about Parcells. Excuses with this bunch are as always plentiful and readily offered. And that crybaby attitude has filtered down to the team.

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    Well according to Kevin, let&#39;s start planning some pre game parties and have blow out tailgates the day of the game since that&#39;s about all we will have to look forward to for the rest of the season&#33; <_<
    Maybe should just invite the team to hang with us this weekend at the Meadowlands and blow off New England too?

    I see that Kevin&#39;s piece was well thought out, intuitive and dead on with alot of 411, but too macabre 4 me.

    B) Call me a foolish optimist, but I still think we have a shot. B)

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    Originally posted by Limolady@Sep 17 2003, 08:51 AM
    Call me a foolish optimist, but I still think we have a shot.
    You foolish optimist&#33; :lol:

    I&#39;m with ya LL.

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    Stern, the info on the Moss trade is straight out of the Jets media guide which I am staring at as I write. It states that Moss was acquired via a trade with Pittsburgh (#16) in exchange for the Jets first round pick (#19), their second round pick in the fourth round, and their sixth pick. My bad on the second and fourth pick, I transposed those by accident. Good catch.

    As for your comments, I have forgotten more about football than you will ever know. So save your snide remarks and look at the real picture without your green colored glasses for moment. And I am not frustrated, I just call it like I see it. I&#39;m not reacting to one or two losses. I&#39;m reacting to the team as a whole. Are you related to Bradway???

    I am more of a fan than you will ever be (season&#39;s since 1977). I praise the team when I see fit and take them to task as well. Did you read my Herm story a couple of weeks ago? I&#39;m not one of these fence sitters. I&#39;m a realist.

    FACT: If Hall doesn&#39;t kick a 53 Yarder in Oakland, we don&#39;t got the playoffs in 2001. If Miami doesn&#39;t collapse and Vinateri doesn&#39;t nail a crucial FG last year, the Green Bay game is moot and we stay home. Those are facts, not fiction. That was my point of saying we&#39;ve been lucky. We haven&#39;t steamrolled teams and won the division by a few games. As for Indy, we all know they are poorly coached and play for s**t on grass. And if Chad doesn&#39;t come off the bench last year what happens? Exactly.

    The basis of your whole argument stems from the fact that we have started off slow, due to poor running game/bad offense and a bend-but-don&#39;t break defense that gets whacked by the run early and then comes on strong. That&#39;s my point. It&#39;s in my first sentence: Doesn&#39;t anyone see a pattern here??? Clear as day.

    How many times can we rely on this philosophy? Sooner or later your luck runs out. And this team&#39;s window is getting smaller and smaller each season.

    As for Chad, you&#39;re telling me that if he is in, the defense stops the run? Are you on crack? Last time I checked, Chad is not Chuck Bednarik. He doesn&#39;t play on both sides of the ball. Would the offense control more clock? Yes. Would they score more points? I would hope so. But that still doesn&#39;t explain how you allow close to 400 yards on the ground in two games, half to the likes of Ladell Betts of the Redskins. Or rush for just nine yards in a half on Sunday. The offensive line is a terrible run blocking unit. They are overmatched and lack power. Anyone can see that.

    So basically you&#39;re content starting off slow every season, getting humiliated for the first four or five weeks, and then Voila, the Jets go into the phone booth and put on their Superman costumes. That&#39;s absurd.

    Also regarding Chad, we all know he wouldn&#39;t be in if not for Vinny getting hurt last year. The org didn&#39;t have faith in him. Did you read this story or just use cliff notes?

    Keep hoping that the D turns it around, OK. There are no tangible run stuffers on the line, the LB&#39;s are pathetic, and the secondary is average at best.

    Listen, this team is slow. Real slow. Did you see the Miami game? Norv Turner exposed the Jets D for what it is, slow reacting. He used short roll out and such to outquick the LB&#39;s and it worked. Dude, Mo Lewis is done. When is the last time Marvin Jones had a sack or did anything special on D? Cowart is a shadow of him former self. The Cover 2 hinges on quick LB&#39;s. Have you been living under a rock?

    And if you truly read my piece, I clearly stated that this is not a gloom and doom column. (Second to last paragraph.)

    Can you really debate me on what players Bradway has brought in here in his three years? Surely you jest. Two starters of 19 players, one of which is starting in his first season (McGraw)??? We need speed and youth at LB and he brings in a slow footed LB. One LB, in Hobson. We need depth and speed in the secondary and he selects a slow footed white safety in Pagel. He takes a seventh rounder from Temple to help the O-line that has the likes of J.P. Machado, who was cut and brought back, and Jonathan Goodwin. Yeah, I feel secure with that group opening holes and protecting the QB.

    You&#39;re whole tirade hinges on one player - Chad. That&#39;s absurd. Any time you want to debate football let me know, ok. Otherwise, don&#39;t waste my time.

  20. #20
    Undrafted Free Agent
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    113
    Stern, just one more tidbit to chew on:

    You say that the West Coast hinges on the QB. So what you are really saying is that if Joe Montana broke his wrist, say in 1985, the 49ers would fold up the tents? They would have teams run all over them, feel sorry for themselves, and have everyone second guessing their work ethic and accountability??? Or maybe lose the first five of seven games and then right the ship before making a playoff run? Ask Bill Walsh if that&#39;s a proven method for winning in the NFL every year.

    The answer is NO. You know why? Because they had more than just Montana. Remember when Simms went down in 1990? He was replaced by Hostetler and they went to the Super Bowl and won. A football team is not ONE player. It&#39;s 22 individuals playing as one.

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