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Thread: A Quick Note to Jets Fans: A Plan is Not a Promise

  1. #1
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    March 26, 2004
    SPORTS OF THE TIMES
    A Quick Note to Jets Fans: A Plan Is Not a Promise

    IT was a bad omen. Here I had gathered with the assembled notebooks, microphones and cameras for the announcement of a $2.8 billion expansion of the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center and the construction of the Jets' football stadium with an exhibit hall on the West Side of Manhattan when I noticed somebody passing out the requisite news releases. But when I asked for one, I was told, "We don't have any more."

    Hmmm $2.8 billion was about to be mentioned over and over, but 28 cents for more news releases apparently was too much of an expense.

    Then again, nobody put a shovel in the ground yesterday, nobody signed a check. All that Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, Governor George E. Pataki and Woody Johnson, the Jets owner, announced was a "historic plan" to expand the Javits Center and build a 75,000-seat stadium.

    The word to remember there is plan. The importance of the word historic remains to be seen.

    Over the years, I've been to too many news conferences with a plan for a stadium that never materialized, like Walter O'Malley's vision of a Dodger ballpark in downtown Brooklyn before he absconded to Los Angeles with the franchise. The baseball Giants talked about a stadium atop the railroad yards about 30 blocks north of the Javits Center. Not only was it never built, the Giants departed for San Francisco.

    The Yankees are 0 for 2 in stadium plans: the one in New Jersey died in a 1987 referendum that ostensibly would have required them to change their name to the New Jersey Yankees, and the one on the West Side got shouted down. The Yankees and the Mets are still waiting for the city's go-ahead on proposed new stadiums.

    In the last 40 years, only three big-league outdoor stadiums have survived the politics and more pressing social needs of the New York metropolitan area Shea Stadium (which opened in 1964 and where the Mets still play), Yankee Stadium (remodeled for the 1976 season) and Giants Stadium (which opened in 1976 but which the Jets, who moved there from Shea in 1984, now hope to abandon when their lease expires after the 2007 season).

    So even though Mayor Bloomberg declared that "the Jets are coming back to New York where they belong," feel free to doubt it until you see it. A plan is not a promise.

    Yesterday's dog-and-pony show was more of a political rally than a news conference. Applause, much of it from members of the hotel workers union that figures to profit from an expanded Javits Center, greeted the mayor, the governor, Johnson and other assorted nabobs hoping to turn the plan into reality.

    The Olympic timetable was a factor. Next month the International Olympic Committee will narrow the list of finalists for the 2012 Summer Games. To make the cut, New York needed at least an announced plan for an Olympic-size stadium.

    Say this for Woody Johnson. He pledged the largest private investment ever put up for a stadium, $800 million; the city and the state plan to contribute $300 million each for the stadium's retractable roof and a platform over the railroad yards on which the stadium would be built. For the Javits Center expansion, the city and the state would contribute $350 million each; a hotel tax would supply an estimated $500 million; and a hotel would be built on 42nd Street with $200 million in private investment.

    But there's no assurance that the city council and the state legislature will approve the financing, no assurance that the No. 7 subway line, which Pataki called "absolutely integral," will be extended to the West Side.

    When the plan's model was unveiled for photographers, the mayor wore a Jets cap but the governor kept his behind his back. Maybe out of respect for the Giants (who technically represent New York) and the Buffalo Bills.

    The stadium has flaws. With most parking in nearby garages, traffic before and after games would be clogged. Even worse, there would be no room for the pregame attraction for many fans: tailgating. Asked about this, Johnson said, "Some would tailgate in New Jersey and take the ferry." But what about those on the New York side of the Hudson?

    Johnson also considers his $800 million an investment, not a donation. Asked who would operate the stadium, he said, "We would," meaning the Jets would get the rent from concerts and exhibit-hall attractions, if not from seat licensing.

    Half an hour later, in a basement community room two blocks away, on 35th Street, Christine Quinn, a city council member from the West Side, and other borough politicians, supported the Javits Center expansion but demanded that the stadium be removed from the plan. They argued, understandably, that the city and state would be better served spending those millions on schools and health care.

    "We'll fight it in the streets," Quinn said of the stadium plan. "We'll fight it in the courts."

    The new stadium is hardly a sure thing. I'll believe it when the Jets warm up for the first game.

  2. #2
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    I'll miss tailgating...

  3. #3
    Maxman
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    Originally posted by jets5ever@Mar 26 2004, 03:53 PM
    I'll miss tailgating...
    I'll miss the thought of you tailgating.

  4. #4
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    "Maybe out of respect for the Giants (who technically represent New York)"

    What does that mean?

    And yes, I'm being serious.

  5. #5
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    Originally posted by Maxman+Mar 26 2004, 04:02 PM--></span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Maxman @ Mar 26 2004, 04:02 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin--jets5ever@Mar 26 2004, 03:53 PM
    I&#39;ll miss tailgating...
    I&#39;ll miss the thought of you tailgating. [/b][/quote]
    That&#39;s cute...dork.

  6. #6
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    The Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is Falling The Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is Falling The Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is FallingThe Sky Is Falling.....The Sky Is Falling ...The Sky Is Falling

  7. #7
    Maxman
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    Originally posted by jets5ever+Mar 26 2004, 04:12 PM--></span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (jets5ever @ Mar 26 2004, 04:12 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>
    Originally posted by -Maxman@Mar 26 2004, 04:02 PM
    <!--QuoteBegin--jets5ever
    @Mar 26 2004, 03:53 PM
    I&#39;ll miss tailgating...

    I&#39;ll miss the thought of you tailgating.
    That&#39;s cute...dork. [/b][/quote]
    You just called me a dork. Time to update the insults. Jerkface.

  8. #8
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    Just because an announcement has been made of a move to Manhattan in 2009.

    It doesn&#39;t mean that it&#39;s going to happen.

    There are so many obstacles for all parties to overcome.

    That&#39;s why I am not giddy about the news. I am taking the appropriate Jet fan approach. "I&#39;ll believe it when I see it".

    I just hope as a Jets fan that Jay Cross and Woody Johnson have a backup plan. A plan B and C so to speak in case this proposed move falls apart.

    The money is there to buy a new stadium but the political backing that is needed to make a move is not if it&#39;s somewhere other than Manhattan.

    It&#39;s very rare in sports that an owner would make an 800 million dollar investement. The only reason that Woody is doing so is because he expects a return and more importantly, This is his best chance to get a stadium passed.

    To get backing from the current mayor and governor is great but it doesn&#39;t guarantee anything.

    I&#39;ll believe it when I see it and when it is finalized, Then I will discuss all the issues involved with the proposal.

  9. #9
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    Call me stupid but what is tailgating

  10. #10
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    Here&#39;s another reason why Assemblymen and Senators from upstate will be loath to spend any state money or authorize the use of any state property for a stadium in NYC. I spoke with my Assemblyman yesterday and he told me point blank there is no way that state funds or assets will be used for any NYC stadium.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    April 1, 2004
    Mayor Wants &#036;5.3 Billion From State for Schools
    By JENNIFER STEINHAUER

    Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg made an audacious play yesterday for billions of dollars in state money that he proclaimed is owed to New York City to pay for the improvement of its public schools, laying out exactly how much he expects and precisely what he would do with the money.

    Two days after a commission appointed by Gov. George E. Pataki found that properly educating children statewide would cost &#036;2.5 billion to &#036;5.6 billion a year in new spending, Mr. Bloomberg said the city should receive &#036;5.3 billion of that money.

    Both that figure, and the mayor&#39;s detailed accounting of how he would spend it, may be no more than a grand opening play in a fight over school financing in Albany that could produce far less in aid. But they also represent the most specific and broad-ranging vision he has laid out for New York City schools since he gained control of the system nearly two years ago.

    The governor&#39;s Commission on Education Reform issued its report on Monday in response to a ruling last June by New York&#39;s highest court that ordered the state to ascertain what it would cost to improve New York City&#39;s schools and then provide those funds. At Mr. Pataki&#39;s urging, the commission, led by Frank G. Zarb, called for billions in new spending for troubled schools all across the state, though it was scrupulously noncommittal about how the money should be divided among the various school districts, or where it should come from.

    Mr. Bloomberg&#39;s plan, presented yesterday in a speech to Pencil, a group that encourages private sector involvement in the schools, amounted to a pre-emptive strike against the Legislature, which the Bloomberg administration fears will tell the city to come up with much of the new money itself.

    The mayor said yesterday that the state government alone should pay the &#036;5.3 billion he said was needed. "The court found that long years of state underfunding had systematically denied our city&#39;s students the sound basic education that is theirs by right," he said.

    But the number he named places the mayor on a collision course with Mr. Pataki, who would like to see the city receive far less in state aid.

    "The mayor is doing his job for New York City, and the governor is doing his job by fighting to ensure that every child across the state, from Brooklyn to Buffalo, has the quality education they deserve," said a spokesman for Mr. Pataki, Kevin Quinn.

    Trying to demonstrate to legislators that such an infusion of cash would not be wasted, Mr. Bloomberg outlined an ambitious plan that addressed almost every problem that ails the system, which educates 1.1 million children.

    Mr. Bloomberg said he would seek smaller class sizes, incentive programs for teachers and new middle schools. He proposed a universal prekindergarten program for the city&#39;s 3- and 4-year-olds, a public program without precedent in the region. He called for enhancing art, science and physical education programs, creating new charter schools, providing more after-school programs and enhancing classroom libraries.

    Mr. Bloomberg is clearly trying to offer both carrots and sticks to his detractors. For those who support his recent controversial move to end so-called social promotion for third graders, this speech could reinforce his image as a unyielding reformer; for those who hated it, he sought to soften the blows.

    In a line added just a few hours before his speech yesterday, Mr. Bloomberg said, "Parents, you have my word: we will do everything in our power to ensure that no student is held back unjustly."

    The mayor went on to outline a wish list of spending priorities that would be sure to please any parent with children in the public schools, and many of them working within them. Many education experts, as well as his rivals, have said for years that smaller class sizes, universal prekindergarten, enriched arts programs and improved middle schools would vastly improve the education of New York&#39;s children.

    Randi Weingarten, the president of the United Federation of Teachers, who has been at war with Mr. Bloomberg over contract negotiations and various policy initiatives, said the mayor&#39;s list of priorities was in line with her own. "This is a great wish list," she said, "but the only omission, and it is glaring, is one addressing the failure to pay competitive salaries to teachers."

    Aides to the mayor refused yesterday to speculate how he would pay for his new programs if the state opted not to foot the bill of more than &#036;5 billion a year.

    Under the current financing formula, the state pays about &#036;5 billion in education aid to the city, and the city roughly matches it. The federal government contributes another &#036;2 billion or so. The mayor&#39;s plan would roughly double the state&#39;s contribution, which Mr. Bloomberg said would be enhanced by the city&#39;s own &#036;13.1 billion, five-year capital plan for the schools. "An equitable distribution of state education funds would allocate roughly three out of every four new dollars to New York City schools," Mr. Bloomberg said.

    But while his conclusion was not on the level of, say, his declaration last year that commuters ought to foot the bill for a yawning city budget gap, it was clear yesterday that his program would be a hard sell.

    "We haven&#39;t agreed on anything in terms of amount," said John E. McArdle, spokesman for the State Senate Republicans. "I think that the expectation is that this should be a federal, state and local effort."

    The mayor&#39;s aides said he had placed calls to the leaders of both the Democratic-controlled Assembly and the Republican-led Senate.

    At the mayor&#39;s speech yesterday, the audience applauded his initiatives. he was applauded for his plan to spend &#036;542 million to create prekindergarten programs - half-day for 35,000 3-year-olds and full-day for 75,000 4-year-olds - and heard many yelps of appreciation for his call to reduce class sizes in kindergarten through third grade to 20 students.

    The mayor said he also wanted to spend &#036;812 million to create new middle schools and restructure existing ones, which produce an astoundingly high number of failing students. Mr. Bloomberg also called for &#036;514 million for new services to special education students and those who do not speak English, and &#036;270 million to recruit teachers and offer them training and other programs.

  11. #11
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    I would look for the NFL to be the heros here. They&#39;ll be lots of fights about appropriating funds between the politicos who want the stadium and those who don&#39;t. That&#39;s when the NFL will step in and offer up a chunk of coin and make everybody happy. And there will be the peace. Why not? The NFL has contributed to the financing of many other stadiums so why not do it for the Jets?

  12. #12
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    Will everyone please cry me a river,

  13. #13
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    Originally posted by JJMAX@Mar 27 2004, 06:29 PM
    Call me stupid but what is tailgating
    there is much drinking of the beer and eating of the meat.

  14. #14
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    Originally posted by scrizzy+Apr 1 2004, 02:18 PM--></span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (scrizzy @ Apr 1 2004, 02:18 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin--JJMAX@Mar 27 2004, 06:29 PM
    Call me stupid but what is tailgating
    there is much drinking of the beer and eating of the meat. [/b][/quote]
    And also following the Car in front of you too Damn Close&#33;&#33; :lol:

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