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Thread: training to play on the Gridiron

  1. #1
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    training to play on the Gridiron

    Hi guys,

    an aussie here considering taking up the gladitorial sport of American Football this year.

    Sydney has a competition run by the New South Wales Gridiron Football League (NSWGFL) which consists of 7 teams - Bondi Raiders, University of Western Sydney Outlaws, Sutherland Seahawks, Sydney University Lions, University of Technology Gridiron, West Sydney Pirates & Wollongong Mustangs. The comp runs in tandem with the American comps from Sep - Dec in our Spring.

    footy codes in australia (australian rules, rugby league and rugby union) are generally steady state sports relying on a sound aerobic base for conditioning (which is what i'm use to) due to the continuity of the games. in contrast, American football appears to rely greatly on the physical attributes of speed, power, reaction and agility requiring all out effort for any period up to 10 secs on each play. obviously, this requires a different approach to conditioning.

    was wondering if any knowledeable folk (most of you as Jets fans would be) can impart some strength and conditioning tips to get me ready for team training in June.

    cheers.

  2. #2
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    First question would be what position are you going to be playing?

  3. #3
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    hey Buzzsaw,

    i'm 176cm & 87kg (or 5'9" & 191lbs in the old language). the weight is primarily lean muscle.

    when i played rugby league, i was a fullback. this position requires speed, agility, ability to catch the ball under pressure, and sound tackling. in rugby league all 13 players on the field play on both sides of the ball. in attack a fullback is a bit like a punt returner, and in defense the fullback is a cover defender positioned 20 - 50 yds behind the defensive line.

    from my size and experience i think that if i play offense on the gridiron, i'll probably be a RB. if i'm on defense, i'll probably end up as a Safety (or in the extreme case, an LB but, i'm a bit too small for this position me thinks).

    thanks for your help.

  4. #4
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    Considering your weight to height, I'd say that you have sufficient weight on your frame <as long as it's muscle as you said>. So I would probably not focus on elaborate weight training as this will bulk you up more than you need, and you might lose flexibilty and agility. If you do lift <and you probably should a few times week to minimize soreness after games>, use low weight, high rep sets. I'd start with 50% of your max and do 4- 20 rep sets, for a total of 80-reps per lift.

    I'd highly suggest wind-sprints--- these will help with your explosiveness off the line-of-scrimmage. Very important for a runningback. When I played football, we did a drill where you ran 10 100 yards sprints, 8 80's, 6 60's, 4 40's, 2 20's. And I can tell you that by the time that you run the 20's you will be absolutely winded. Or just do 100 20 yard dashes-- these simulate what you'll be doing in the games every play. Don't forget to get into a 3-point stance for each sprint.

    And biking, swimming, etc. should be used a few times a week as cross-training, plus to help the monotony of doing the same exercises every day.

    I'm about to go home so I'll try to post some more tips tomorrow if I can.

  5. #5
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    i'm currently concentrating on strength (i.e. low reps) with my weight training so i really shouldn't put on any more weight in that area. i might even lose a bit if my calories-in doesn't match the calories-out with the step up in conditioning.

    that sprint drill sounds painful. that's 30-odd sprints. is that at 100%?

    thanks for the tips. will call in tomorrow for some more.

    cheers.

  6. #6
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    any more help with preparation for the upcoming season?

  7. #7
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    As Buzzsaw said, speed training is a good thing, at any postion speed is a good attribute. Have you played much ball before? Something just as important as the physical training will be training for your potential postions. Running patterns if you are going to be a receiver, practive running, blocking and pass catching if you are a running back etc. Being a smarter player is as important as being in really good shape. Pick the one or two positions you want to try out for and work on them alot.

  8. #8
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    never set foot onto the gridiron before.

    i've done some research on the web over the last few days and most american football coaches do hammer the importance of SPEED as Buzzsaw and you mentioned.

    i'll concentrate on RB and S as these positions do share similarities to the FB position i've played in rugby league here in oz. my size is probably more suited to these skill roles.

    what the heck is rugby league you say?? take a look here!

    cheers.

  9. #9
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    wow man, those hits are freaky, ive watched rugby a couple a times brutal but intersting sport

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