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Thread: The Ravens Scare Me

  1. #1
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    The Ravens Scare Me

    this year. Their D has not been this stacked since the year they won the superbowl and they have a better offense this year than that year.

    Their offense has a pro-bowl receiver in Mason and they added a play maker in Clayton to go along with Heap and Jamal Lewis. The only thing holding the ravens back is Boller. If he steps up this year, then watch out. I think the Ravens easily go to the superbowl.

    check this article out on them.



    http://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/f...orts-headlines

    Ravens' 'D' adds up to '46'
    Rex Ryan says defense will use scheme invented by his father



    By Jamison Hensley
    Sun Staff

    May 25, 2005

    Dusting off a family heirloom yesterday, first-year coordinator Rex Ryan announced the Ravens will unleash the 46 defense this season.

    At the team's first coaching clinic with the media, Ryan said the Ravens will keep some of the looks of the 3-4 defense they used last year but will incorporate a heavy dose of the scheme that his father, Buddy, invented for the dominant Chicago Bears teams.

    This style of defense is a highly pressurized one that relies on an eight-man front to stop the run and sophisticated blitzes to smother the pass.

    It's believed no NFL team has run the 46 defense exclusively since Buddy Ryan left the NFL in 1995 after being fired as head coach of the Arizona Cardinals.

    "We're not going to play the 46 just because my dad is going to kick my butt ," Ryan said. "We're going to play it because it makes sense to play it. This is going to be a big part of what we do defensively."

    This defense was named "46" after the uniform number of Doug Plank, the Bears' safety who dropped down behind the linemen as an extra inside linebacker. His role on the Ravens will be played by Will Demps.

    Ray Lewis, who will be the Ravens' Mike Singletary, should have the same freedom to roam sideline to sideline while blockers are occupied by the Ravens' six-man line (nose tackle Maake Kemoeatu, ends Tony Weaver and Kelly Gregg, strong-side linebacker Adalius Thomas, weak-side linebacker Tommy Polley and rush end Terrell Suggs).

    And Suggs is expected to be this version's Richard Dent, a pass rusher who can thrive on the one-on-one matchups forced by this deceptive and innovative scheme.

    By having the ends line up wide of the guards and the nose tackle occupying the center, it virtually eliminates any double teams. And with three linebackers stacking the line, offenses didn't know who was covering and who was charging.

    In a recent episode of SportsCentury on ESPN Classic about the 46 defense, there were numerous interviews with opponents who expressed their desperation, confusion and even fear at facing the 46.

    "We're going to pressure more than we've ever done in the past," Ryan said. "Everyone in the league will come in with the same mind-set: 'Oh shoot, here they come.' We are not going to disappoint them."

    Coach Brian Billick said no one knows more about this defense than Ryan, who co-wrote Coaching Football's 46 Defense a few years ago to instruct high school and college coaches.

    And no one has a better sounding board, given Ryan's frequent calls to his father.

    "He's probably as excited as I am about this," Ryan said. "We talked about how this gets the bull's eye off Ray. He said, 'He doesn't need to be that big anymore, he doesn't need to be a nose guard this year.'"

    Last season in the 3-4 defense (three linemen and four linebackers), offenses frequently were able to get free blockers on Lewis. But the 46 defense is designed to allow Lewis to once again become the league's dominant defensive player.

    "He's the most explosive athlete in the league," Ryan said. "We want him to be the run-hit guy. We want him getting to the ball."

    Another remedy to free up Lewis would be moving back full time to the 4-3 defense.

    But Suggs and Thomas are considered too small to play defensive end every down, so the Ravens have decided to capitalize on their abilities to rush the passer and drop into coverage. Their versatility gives Ryan the option of switching into the 46, the 4-3, the 3-4 and even the 6-1 alignments just before the snap.

    Asked how often the Ravens will line up in the 46 defense, Ryan said: "The good thing is they don't know if we're going to run it one snap or every snap. If a team can't handle it, they're going to see a whole lot. If we think they've got a good answer, then we won't run it. But if we feel we need it, it's like aspirin, and we're going to take it."

    The one negative against the 46 is its reputation of being high risk, high reward.

    By jamming the line, the defense has fewer players in deep coverage and makes it more susceptible to the big pass plays.

    "I think that's classified wrong," Ryan said. "We're going to be aggressive. If we do give up a touchdown deep, we're going to hear about it. But we plan on making a lot more plays than we're giving up."

    The Ravens have the benefit of two Pro Bowl cornerbacks in Chris McAlister and Samari Rolle along with Ed Reed, the NFL's Defensive Player of the Year, roaming the secondary.

    "The fact that we have those kind of cover guys will make it much better," Ryan said. "We don't have to sit back and hold our breath."

    After Ryan unveiled the defense's new look, Billick talked about how his relationship with him has come full circle.

    Their first meeting came 15 years ago in Toronto, where Ryan spoke about the 46 defense at a coaching clinic.

    "It's going to be an interesting marriage with what he plans philosophically with a very unique, elite group of physical talent," Billick said. "We're going to do some things you haven't seen in this league in a long time."

    NOTES: Left guard Edwin Mulitalo, who had surgery in late December to repair torn triceps in his left arm, said his rehabilitation remains on schedule. "We've set the pace to come back to training camp," he said. ...

    The Ravens signed safety Chris Kelley, a former University of Maryland player whose career was slowed by injuries to both knees. "It's always been in the back of my head to never stop believing," said Kelley, who participated in the Washington Redskins' rookie minicamp last month but was not signed. "Since I was a little kid, I always wanted to be in the NFL. I'm glad I got the opportunity to come out here and want to make the best of it. I'm going to get out there, bang some heads and make some plays." ...

    The first scuffle of the offseason broke out when about a handful of players piled on one another during drills between the offensive and defensive lines. One player said the fight broke out when a backup offensive lineman pushed defensive tackle Aubrayo Franklin.


    Copyright 2005, The Baltimore Sun



    RealJetFan

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    There's no doubt to me that the Ravens and Vikes made the biggest gains this offseason. The Vikes will still struggle since Teddy is their DC.

    The Ravens will be a force, but will also be beatable. What's Rex Ryan's experience? I'm not the only one who thinks Ray Lewis looked a step slower last year. And Boller is still a question mark. Clayton--isn't he a rookie? If he is don't expect too much of an impact.

    Two comments on the 46 Defense:
    1. It's been a while since I've seen it. Most of the guys in the league today may struggle against it because they haven't seen it too much either.
    2. Wouldn't this be the ideal way to shut Ron Mexi...err Mike Vick down?

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    Ravens will be very very scary this year...If Boller has a breakout year it wouldnt suprise me at all if the won the Bowl.....

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    If any team can run the 46 with success, it's the Ravens. To be successful at it, you need to have a strong secondary and the Ravens at Pro-Bowlers all around at that position. They have Rolle and McCallister at corners with Ed Reed as the safety.

    Can you imagine, Chad seeing an 8 man front with Ray, Suggs, Cody, Adalus Thomas and company right at the line of scrimmage daring him to throw deep. That's something i'm not comfortable with. Espically with Chad coming off of a shoulder surgery.

    I don't know, hte Ravens look like the team to beat right now. They completely re-tooled from 2000 and will be real difficult to beat.

    RealJetFan

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    that defensive idea scares me a little, but I think we might even be able to make the defense look horrible. If we had last years offense, we wouldn't make it to 100 total yards on the day against a defense like this, but under our new style offense, we'll see a lot of shotgun formations where chad can have that extra second, and one of our recievers will be able to break free right away, most likely the slot reciever, but I think even JMac would have a good game. He'd be mostly one-on-one all day. And who would cover the slot? Suggs or Thomas? I'll take those odds. Just inform CMart he won't get as many carries as he's used to.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by SINYJets
    There's no doubt to me that the Ravens and Vikes made the biggest gains this offseason. The Vikes will still struggle since Teddy is their DC.

    The Ravens will be a force, but will also be beatable. What's Rex Ryan's experience? I'm not the only one who thinks Ray Lewis looked a step slower last year. And Boller is still a question mark. Clayton--isn't he a rookie? If he is don't expect too much of an impact.

    Two comments on the 46 Defense:
    1. It's been a while since I've seen it. Most of the guys in the league today may struggle against it because they haven't seen it too much either.
    2. Wouldn't this be the ideal way to shut Ron Mexi...err Mike Vick down?

    Rex Ryan is almost in the same scenerio as Donnie Henderson and we know how that turned out. I mean their both from the same program.

    This is most definately Boller's make or break year. But i don't think he'll be asked to do as much this time. If he performs just like Dilfer did when they won the superbowl, then i think it's more than enough with their defense.

    Clayton is a rookie, but as of late, the 3 year rule to rookie receivers isn't really being applied. Look at Roy Williams, Lee Evans, Boldin, and Andre Johnson. All of these guys are breaking the 3 year rule. Clayton has a lot of talent and has the ability to make an immediate impact.

    RealJetFan

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    Quote Originally Posted by SINYJets
    There's no doubt to me that the Ravens and Vikes made the biggest gains this offseason. The Vikes will still struggle since Teddy is their DC.

    The Ravens will be a force, but will also be beatable. What's Rex Ryan's experience? I'm not the only one who thinks Ray Lewis looked a step slower last year. And Boller is still a question mark. Clayton--isn't he a rookie? If he is don't expect too much of an impact.

    Two comments on the 46 Defense:
    1. It's been a while since I've seen it. Most of the guys in the league today may struggle against it because they haven't seen it too much either.
    2. Wouldn't this be the ideal way to shut Ron Mexi...err Mike Vick down?

    I do not fear the 46 personally... they crowd the line of scrimmage, I put four wideouts in. I believe the run and shoot was designed to help offset the pressure created by the 46 wasn't it? If there are four wideouts in the lineup, you sacrifice the stand in the pocket pass protection in order to have the extra receivers on the field. Three step slant patterns, quick screens outside to wideouts, and maybe even the delay draw up the middle should help offset the 46.

    Either way... seems to me a defense is going to think twice if they see four wideouts on the field while they plan on crowding the line of scrimmage. Sounds like a mismatch is going to happen somewhere to me.

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    Ozzie Newsome was smart to finally let their OC walk and signing Jim Fassel to replace him. Fassel isn't a great head coach, but as OC he should get that offense somewhere in the 10-20 range in the NFL-- which is all they need with that defense.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzzsaw
    Ozzie Newsome was smart to finally let their OC walk and signing Jim Fassel to replace him. Fassel isn't a great head coach, but as OC he should get that offense somewhere in the 10-20 range in the NFL-- which is all they need with that defense.
    good point

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    they don't scare me for one reason....at QB!

    They have gotten better on paper but so have the Jets.

  11. #11
    Until this team shows me that it can be a really good road team im not scared of them. Right now my take on their defense is that its a very good defense with a bunch of ballhakws in the secondary. Ray Lewis was bad last season compared to all the hype and they didnt get after the ball the way they did a few years back. The thing is the defense, which is a game changer at home, doesnt make the plays on the road to cover for the offense, the Jets debacle notwithstanding. The Ravens pummel people at home behind their defense. They lose on the road because they dont play at the same level.

    Offensively what is there to really be afraid of as long as Boller is the QB? For all the hype that goes with Jim Fassell QB guru, how much luck did he have with the Giants and their QB rotation until Kerry Collins fell into his lap. The Giant offense never became what people thought it would be and was closer to the bottom of the NFL rather than the top. That wont change with him as OC in Baltimore. There has to be a big question surrounding Jamal Lewis this year. Who knows how he comes back or if it takes him some time to round into shape. Heap will be solid and Moore should have a good second year. Both Mason and Clayton I think are too small to be good with the QB they have. Boller is all over the field with the ball. Height helps him big time. Neither has it. And for as polished as Clayton has looked as a rookie it will probably take him at least 6 games before he makes the kind of impact some expect, especially in this offense. It could take some time as well for this squad to gel with the new faces and philosophy.

  12. #12
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    Ravens will be very good this year.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Fumes
    I do not fear the 46 personally... they crowd the line of scrimmage, I put four wideouts in. I believe the run and shoot was designed to help offset the pressure created by the 46 wasn't it? If there are four wideouts in the lineup, you sacrifice the stand in the pocket pass protection in order to have the extra receivers on the field. Three step slant patterns, quick screens outside to wideouts, and maybe even the delay draw up the middle should help offset the 46.

    Either way... seems to me a defense is going to think twice if they see four wideouts on the field while they plan on crowding the line of scrimmage. Sounds like a mismatch is going to happen somewhere to me.
    I think you're right here. The proliferation of the spread offense in the NFL today was at least partially the result of the 46 defense. I remember when Buddy Ryans Eagles use to run this defense against my favorite Giants teams of the 80's. It's a fearsome defense if your team has a weak offensive line or little firepower in your deep passing attack. The Ravens might be the team with the secondary power to pull it off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jetsfreak



    they don't scare me for one reason....at QB!

    They have gotten better on paper but so have the Jets.

    BOLLER isnt the greatest QB but fassell deffently helped him last year...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eversteady
    I think you're right here. The proliferation of the spread offense in the NFL today was at least partially the result of the 46 defense. I remember when Buddy Ryans Eagles use to run this defense against my favorite Giants teams of the 80's. It's a fearsome defense if your team has a weak offensive line or little firepower in your deep passing attack. The Ravens might be the team with the secondary power to pull it off.

    The Ravens won't always be in the 46, they'll also have the 43, 34, and 61. I don't think anyone can believe that our offense is on par with their D right now. Our Qb has yet to throw a pass since Jan and that's not a good sign.

    Now granted the Jets got better also this year, but Ravens improved a whole lot more. The only thing holding them back will be the play of Kyle Boller. That offense will only go as far as Boller takes them. Every piece is set for him, and if the offense stalls again, then Boller's out in my opinion.

    RealJetFan

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eversteady
    I think you're right here. The proliferation of the spread offense in the NFL today was at least partially the result of the 46 defense. I remember when Buddy Ryans Eagles use to run this defense against my favorite Giants teams of the 80's. It's a fearsome defense if your team has a weak offensive line or little firepower in your deep passing attack. The Ravens might be the team with the secondary power to pull it off.

    Secondary power can not outmatch numbers and the law of averages.
    If they are crowding the line, and you have four receivers on the field, SOMEONE is going to be open even if only for a short period of time. There can only be 11 men of the defensive side of the ball, so if 7, or 8 are crowding the line, that only leaves 3 or 4 to cover routes. The bet is that those 7 or 8 will get to the qb before he can deliver the ball, and its not a bad wager. If you lose that bet, and one of your four receivers gets behind his guy, he has open field behind him. And, if I recall correctly, the teams who ran the run and shoot well also did it in conjunction with the hurry up offense.

    There was a season where we played the Ravens, and the first two possessions we had, we scored. Why? We ran the hurry up offense. The way to keep an aggressive defense on their heels is to attack it, and attack it quick. Don't let them substitute, don't let them get back to the line of scrimmage before you, and don't let them get set in their stances before you hike the ball. No hut 1, hut2, hut 3, hike... get to the line, line up, and hike right away!!!!! You hike that ball, and immediately throw the ball to a wideout lined up outside, its gotta go for at least four yards. Line your tight end up at the end of the line, snap the ball, have him release whoever is in front of him and go to whatever spot the person who just passed him came from and he should be open cause there simply aren't enough people on the defense to be everywhere... another three or four yadrs at least. And this is assuming he gets tackled right away.

    I like the 46, always did. I like the cover 2. I like the bend but don't break. I like the 3-4, the 4-3, the 5-2 and the 6-1!!!! I just don't like it run exclusively. I don't like anything run exclusively. No good coordinator or head coach should be "known" for doing any one thing anymore than any other thing. A team should have no specialty, but should be adept at enough of everything to make them a challenge week in and week out.

    I hate to point to the Pats, but credit must be given where it is due. Mumbles does all things good enough to be competitive, and he is not specialized, nor are his players specialized. We'll see if it is him that is so good, or if it was his coordinators, but the team as it stood last year was not great at any one thing, and it was that lack of greatness, or should I say that complete versatility, that has allowed them to be the team to beat for the past five or six years.

    The 46 by itself can, and has been beaten. The 46, the 3-4 the 4-3, the cover 2, the bend but don't break, all on the field at the same time done by the same team... thats a dangerous football team!!!!!!!!!

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