Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Successful DE

  1. #1
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    903

    Successful DE

    How to be a successful DE? Other than being a fierce pass rusher and run stopper, teach me how to be a great DE? I mght play football in High School as a DE.

  2. #2
    All League
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Posts
    2,999
    Wow. This... is going to be hard.

    Defensive end is the most difficult position to learn on the football field. It's absolutely crucial to get it out of your head that a defensive end is a "pass-rushing" spot. Yes, you will rush the passer sometimes as a defensive end. In certain simpler schemes, you may even spend most of your time crashing the pocket. But that's not an end's only job and in most schemes it's not even his primary job.

    First, a defensive end must be quick, primarily. At the high school level you may find ends that weigh as little as 150 pounds. The smaller ones are going to have to get used to taking a beating, however, as you're going to get absolutely buried by bigger tackles or pulling guards when the opposing offense is trying to sweep or otherwise turn the corner. Focus on your quickness. You need to be able to get out of a stance very, very fast. Strength is important, but at the high school level for an end it is not critical. Strength training should only be done above the age of 15 or so, remember, just to be safe. Speed and quickness training can be started at any time however.

    A defensive end has various assignments or jobs to do depending on what scheme your team runs and what particular set you're working out of and, of course, what you're forced to defend against. I'll list and describe some of these jobs below. Please note that these assignments don't have any real name in any particular case - it's up to the coach who teaches it.

    Pocket Crashing - The stereotypical DE assignment that is most familiar to football fans is a pocket crash. In this assignment, the DE is trusted to shed away from the tackle assigned to block him and get to the quarterback. He must not penetrate too deeply to ensure that the quarterback cannot run by him. In a pocket crash, the goal is either a sack, a quarterback pressure or a disruption of a running play in the backfield.

    Gap Stuffing - A gap stuff is a basic DE assignment that is called when your coach feels the other team is going to run through one of the gaps in the offensive line. The DE's job will be to quickly shed his blocker and fill the gap the blocker was trying to dig you out of. Do remember that if a tackle or guard is blocking you, look where he's trying to push you away from! That's where the ball will be. It sounds simpleminded but it's so crucial that most players don't think about it.

    Gap Eating - Often times linebackers become superstars when they play behind a strong defensive line that keeps offensive linemen from shedding and coming to block them. A gap-eating DE usually works out of a 4-4 (or, rare to high school, a 3-4) set and is trusted to make certain that the offensive tackle isn't able to get to the linebacker's level and block him. To football novices this may seem strange - a gap eating DE is in fact blocking the opposition's blockers! Gap eating is usually associated with DTs, but bigger DEs in special sets can be called upon for this too.

    Containment - Most DEs hate doing this. It's hard and there's no glory associated with it. A containing DE is trusted to quickly shed his blocker and go into the opposition's backfield near the hash mark and STAND THERE. Yes, that's right. Stand. It's meant to disrupt the flow of the play and can often lead to sectioning off where the flow of the play is going. An defense with an effective containment DE will be able to flow to the side opposite of this DE without worrying too much. This can overload a side and help other members of your defense pile up the stats, but you won't get much glory. It's very important though. It can also be effective in containing a running quarterback - DEs are set to contain in Madden on plays like QB SPY and such. If you're playing Mike Vick and having trouble, try making your DEs contain.

    Option Defense - Not really an assignment per se, just remember that if another team tries to run the option on you (which tons of high school teams do) the DEs job is to HIT THE QUARTERBACK NOT THE PITCHMAN almost all the time. Remember, any numbnuts can defend the option 100% of the time if he is thinking and his team is too.

    Hope this helps. Good luck. Remember, this is a hard, hard position to master. Props if you do. I never did.

  3. #3
    JetsInsider.com Legend
    Board Moderator

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    27,261
    Paranoid -- that was an excellent post! Welcome to JI

  4. #4
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Hauppauge, New York
    Posts
    1,468
    Quote Originally Posted by The Paranoid Jet
    Wow. This... is going to be hard.

    Defensive end is the most difficult position to learn on the football field. It's absolutely crucial to get it out of your head that a defensive end is a "pass-rushing" spot. Yes, you will rush the passer sometimes as a defensive end. In certain simpler schemes, you may even spend most of your time crashing the pocket. But that's not an end's only job and in most schemes it's not even his primary job.

    First, a defensive end must be quick, primarily. At the high school level you may find ends that weigh as little as 150 pounds. The smaller ones are going to have to get used to taking a beating, however, as you're going to get absolutely buried by bigger tackles or pulling guards when the opposing offense is trying to sweep or otherwise turn the corner. Focus on your quickness. You need to be able to get out of a stance very, very fast. Strength is important, but at the high school level for an end it is not critical. Strength training should only be done above the age of 15 or so, remember, just to be safe. Speed and quickness training can be started at any time however.

    A defensive end has various assignments or jobs to do depending on what scheme your team runs and what particular set you're working out of and, of course, what you're forced to defend against. I'll list and describe some of these jobs below. Please note that these assignments don't have any real name in any particular case - it's up to the coach who teaches it.

    Pocket Crashing - The stereotypical DE assignment that is most familiar to football fans is a pocket crash. In this assignment, the DE is trusted to shed away from the tackle assigned to block him and get to the quarterback. He must not penetrate too deeply to ensure that the quarterback cannot run by him. In a pocket crash, the goal is either a sack, a quarterback pressure or a disruption of a running play in the backfield.

    Gap Stuffing - A gap stuff is a basic DE assignment that is called when your coach feels the other team is going to run through one of the gaps in the offensive line. The DE's job will be to quickly shed his blocker and fill the gap the blocker was trying to dig you out of. Do remember that if a tackle or guard is blocking you, look where he's trying to push you away from! That's where the ball will be. It sounds simpleminded but it's so crucial that most players don't think about it.

    Gap Eating - Often times linebackers become superstars when they play behind a strong defensive line that keeps offensive linemen from shedding and coming to block them. A gap-eating DE usually works out of a 4-4 (or, rare to high school, a 3-4) set and is trusted to make certain that the offensive tackle isn't able to get to the linebacker's level and block him. To football novices this may seem strange - a gap eating DE is in fact blocking the opposition's blockers! Gap eating is usually associated with DTs, but bigger DEs in special sets can be called upon for this too.

    Containment - Most DEs hate doing this. It's hard and there's no glory associated with it. A containing DE is trusted to quickly shed his blocker and go into the opposition's backfield near the hash mark and STAND THERE. Yes, that's right. Stand. It's meant to disrupt the flow of the play and can often lead to sectioning off where the flow of the play is going. An defense with an effective containment DE will be able to flow to the side opposite of this DE without worrying too much. This can overload a side and help other members of your defense pile up the stats, but you won't get much glory. It's very important though. It can also be effective in containing a running quarterback - DEs are set to contain in Madden on plays like QB SPY and such. If you're playing Mike Vick and having trouble, try making your DEs contain.

    Option Defense - Not really an assignment per se, just remember that if another team tries to run the option on you (which tons of high school teams do) the DEs job is to HIT THE QUARTERBACK NOT THE PITCHMAN almost all the time. Remember, any numbnuts can defend the option 100% of the time if he is thinking and his team is too.

    Hope this helps. Good luck. Remember, this is a hard, hard position to master. Props if you do. I never did.
    Wow, i played de in high school, and you just spoke the absolute truth.





  5. #5
    Jets Insider VIP
    JetsInsider.com Legend
    Charter JI Member

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Posts
    31,400
    You forgot possibly the most important aspect.......leverage.

    You've got to learn to bend your knees and keep your pads low to the ground, getting underneath blockers....if you get to upright and tall nothing will matter as a good offensive lineman can easily control you at the point of attack and knock you out from the play.

  6. #6
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Hauppauge, New York
    Posts
    1,468
    Quote Originally Posted by Come Back to NY
    You forgot possibly the most important aspect.......leverage.

    You've got to learn to bend your knees and keep your pads low to the ground, getting underneath blockers....if you get to upright and tall nothing will matter as a good offensive lineman can easily control you at the point of attack and knock you out from the play.
    that is very true. If you don't use your legs, you will not be successful.

  7. #7
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    13,518
    Some very important things when playing anywhere on the D-Line:

    1. STAY LOW. If you stand straight up it doesn't matter how fast and strong you are.....you will get knocked on your a$$ often.

    2. REACT. D-Linemen must learn to react to how and where the opposing lineman is trying to block you. You have to fight the pressure, ie: go where he's trying to push you away from. This was always the most difficult thing for me to pick up when I played in high school.

    3. USE YOUR HANDS. Don't think you're going to win every battle by bull-rushing (trying to run through a blocker). Keep his hands off of you. If he can't get his hands on you, he can't block you.

    4. BE READY FOR A WAR. Skill positions get the glory, but the real men are in the trenches. Every play is a battle. Expect to get as many bumps and bruises as you're going to give out.

    5. If you get by untouched or shed a block easily, don't think it's because you're great. Most likely you're the target of a trap or the offense is running a screen. Stand your ground and stay low.

  8. #8
    All League
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Posts
    2,999
    Quote Originally Posted by Come Back to NY
    You forgot possibly the most important aspect.......leverage.

    You've got to learn to bend your knees and keep your pads low to the ground, getting underneath blockers....if you get to upright and tall nothing will matter as a good offensive lineman can easily control you at the point of attack and knock you out from the play.
    Ooh, GREAT point. Being a youngster you probably don't really have a complex grasp of leverage quite yet. But that's entirely right. You need to learn to get great power from your core (which is your abs and back and the stem of all your power) so that you can function most effectively with your knees bent. When your knees are bent, all your motions are also more explosive. Great point, Come Back.

    Sourceworx also mentioned something else important: your hands! There's no holding on defense, remember (not entirely true, but it's hard to get called for it). Slap the opposing tackle around (not in the head! that's illegal). Learn a good 'punch' move to stun the tackle at the point of attack. Keep your hands moving. Pull the jersey, throw the player, just get free.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Follow Us